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Identifying key aspects of household behavior in a representative agent framework

Article

Identifying key aspects of household behavior in a representative agent framework

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Abstract

We study three key aspects of household behavior, i.e. the form of household preferences, the existence of interdependence between consumption and leisure choices, and the Frisch elasticity of labor supply. We find that an appropriate form of household preferences to use in non-recursive utility functions that incorporates the feature of interdependence is of the Cobb-Douglas type. By solving the household maximization problem, we derive a simultaneous system of two equations, a consumption equation and a labor supply equation, and estimate them with non-linear GMM. Regarding our estimates, the weight of consumption in the utility function, which is on the upper side of the relevant estimates in the literature, and the elasticity of intertemporal substitution seem to drive up the Frisch elasticity value. Our work highlights the importance of both the choice of the form of household preferences and the appropriate estimation procedure in the household maximization problem for obtaining reasonable values of the preference parameters, especially the Frisch elasticity. Our results may be useful for researchers working with the calibration of preference parameters in DSGE models.

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... The coefficients of earning members are positive and statistically significant at a 1% level of significance in both urban and rural regions of Central Punjab. It indicates that households with more earning members have 12.3 and 3.5 times more chances of upward mobility in urban and rural Central Punjab, respectively (Bechlioulis & Brissimis, 2021). ...
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The equilibrium growth model is modified and used to explain the cyclical variances of a set of economic time series, the covariances between real output and the other series, and the autocovariance of output. The model is fitted to quarterly data for the post-war U.S. economy. Crucial features of the model are the assumption that more than one time period is required for the construction of new productive capital, and the non-time-separable utility function that admits greater intertemporal substitution of leisure. The fit is surprisingly good in light of the model's simplicity and the small number of free parameters.
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