Chapter

Padrões da paisagem

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Abstract

Os vários recursos de uma paisagem obedecem a uma disposição, a um arranjo, ou seja a um determinado padrão. Os diferentes padrões que podem ser observados nas paisagens resultam de diferentes processos que ocorrem simultaneamente em áreas geográficas de grandes dimensões, e que variam de lugar para lugar. É com este enfoque que o capítulo se desenvolve, considerando os elementos fundamentais que descrevem as paisagens, ou seja, a estrutura, os processos, as interações entre a estrutura e os processos, e a sua evolução temporal. Para uma melhor compreensão da natureza destes padrões, são ainda descritos os fatores que determinam a sua formação e como se pode sistematizar a caracterização, avaliação e modelação da paisagem através da identificação dos componentes da sua estrutura. The different patterns that can be observed in the landscapes result from different processes that occur simultaneously in large geographic areas and that differ from place to place. This chapter is developed on the basis of this evidence, considering the fundamental elements that allow describing the landscapes, namely the structure, the processes, the interactions between the structure and the processes, and their temporal variation. For a better understanding of the nature of the landscape patterns, the factors that drive its formation are also described, as well as how landscape characterization, assessment and modelling can be systematized by identifying the components of its structure.

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