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Dataset on the concentrations of anticoagulant rodenticides in raptors from the Canary Islands with geographic information

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The dataset presented in this article supports “Intensive livestock farming as a major determinant of the exposure to anticoagulant rodenticides in raptors of the Canary Islands (Spain)” (Rial-Berriel et al., 2020). A Geographic Information System (GIS) analysis on the influence of the influence of livestock activity on exposure to anticoagulant rodenticides in raptors in the Canary Islands was performed. This dataset provides geographic information on the localization of each raptor (either positive or negative for anticoagulant rodenticides, n = 308), as well as the concentrations of each compound found in their livers. In addition, we present complementary analyses to those included in the main article, such as the detailed analysis of the farming activity influence on anticoagulant rodenticide exposure of raptors, by island and by raptor species.
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... The methodology used for blood and liver samples allowed the search respectively for 360 and 351 compounds highly toxic to animals and has been fully validated according to international guidelines [38,39] and previously published by our group [3,35,36,40]. The complete list of analytes, as well as the technique used for their quantification, can be found in Appendix A. The extraction of blood and liver are based on the QuEChERS technique, although in our methods, a miniaturization of this technique has been performed, allowing the use of only 250 µL of blood [35,36] or 1 g of liver [3,40], without requiring any additional purification step, nor any change of solvent. ...
... The methodology used for blood and liver samples allowed the search respectively for 360 and 351 compounds highly toxic to animals and has been fully validated according to international guidelines [38,39] and previously published by our group [3,35,36,40]. The complete list of analytes, as well as the technique used for their quantification, can be found in Appendix A. The extraction of blood and liver are based on the QuEChERS technique, although in our methods, a miniaturization of this technique has been performed, allowing the use of only 250 µL of blood [35,36] or 1 g of liver [3,40], without requiring any additional purification step, nor any change of solvent. For the rest of the samples (baits, gastric and intestinal contents, decomposing carcasses), a solid-liquid extraction was usually used, according to a procedure also previously published by our group [4,37], although in the case of these auxiliary samples, we consider the analyses to be semi-quantitative only. ...
... The total number of positive identifications represented 29.9% of the samples submitted during this period. The number of deceased animals in incidents where a chemical was detected in toxic concentrations was significantly higher than in negative cases (mean 2.53 ± 0.28 vs. 1.31 ± 0.15, p < 0.0001), as has been described in other works at the international level [6,7,[40][41][42][43], and in the previous studies conducted in the Canary Islands [4,44]. ...
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... First, the high prevalence of second-generation anticoagulant rodenticides in wildlife's liver is noteworthy. It was expected, as it has been described in many parts of the world [52][53][54] and recently in the Canary Islands [45,55,56]. However, the presence of at least one of these compounds in more than 80% of the birds studied is striking, even in non-predatory birds such as the blackbird (Turdus merula) or the common curlew (Burhinus oedicnemus), which would point to the fact that these compounds penetrate the trophic chain by several routes, probably including invertebrates, as suggested by other authors [57,58]. ...
... First, the high prevalence of second-generation anticoagulant rodenticides in wildlife's liver is noteworthy. It was expected, as it has been described in many parts of the world [52][53][54] and recently in the Canary Islands [45,55,56]. However, the presence of at least one of these compounds in more than 80% of the birds studied is striking, even in nonpredatory birds such as the blackbird (Turdus merula) or the common curlew (Burhinus oedicnemus), which would point to the fact that these compounds penetrate the trophic chain by several routes, probably including invertebrates, as suggested by other authors [57,58]. ...
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