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The practical challenges of achieving sustainable wetland agriculture in Nigeria's Cross River basin The practical challenges of achieving sustainable wetland agriculture in Nigeria's Cross River basin

Article

The practical challenges of achieving sustainable wetland agriculture in Nigeria's Cross River basin The practical challenges of achieving sustainable wetland agriculture in Nigeria's Cross River basin

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Abstract

The practical challenges of achieving sustainable wetland agriculture in Nigeria are examined. Three wetland communities were studied with observations, meetings, focus groups, interviews, a workshop and a review of the literature. We find that the available wetlands are greatly under-utilized due to meteorological and climate-related challenges, poor human capacities, absence of science-policy collaboration, complex land tenure regimes and a lack of supportive infrastructure. Climate change impact manifests in either excessive seasonal flooding or prolonged drought, with consequences for livelihoods. Improving the utilization and productivity of the wetlands will require strong public policies, appropriate investment, human capacity building, science-policy-society cooperation and supportive infrastructure. ARTICLE HISTORY

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... Conflicts with surrounding land use in terms of water level and water quality often hamper wetland restoration and biodiversity conservation projects (Decleer et al. 2016). The findings are directly in line with previous findings that climate change is related to land use change, as both significantly affect wetland productivity (Gell et al. 2012;Rashford et al. 2015;Sutcliffe et al. 2016) particularly, the impact of climate change on wetland farming operation has affected a significant proportion of local communities and poor farmers whose livelihoods depend on subsistence and small-scale farming operation (Emmanuel and Gabriel 2021). ...
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