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Este libro incluye contribuciones que, desde diferentes perspectivas, analizan las formas de anclaje en el territorio de la producción láctea, los vínculos entre los agentes participantes y de éstos con los mercados. Sin embargo, algunos de los temas aquí tratados transcienden esta actividad, y pueden iluminar cuestiones relativas a la interfaz entre el plano sectorial y el territorial en otras producciones agroalimentarias. Las preguntas que intentan responder los diferentes trabajos de esta compilación giran en torno a los siguientes aspectos: ¿Cómo captar el anclaje en el territorio de los principales agentes que se desenvuelven en la actividad láctea? ¿Cuáles son las formas en que éstos interactúan, sus estrategias e impactos sobre los espacios locales? ¿Qué posibilidades y limitaciones existen para aquellas iniciativas que apuntan a mejorar el bienestar de los sujetos más afectados por las tendencias excluyentes del sistema agroalimentario? El punto de partida son las actividades de investigación efectuadas en el marco de un proyecto que analizó la cuenca lechera del oeste de la provincia de Entre Ríos, Argentina. La obra también incluye contribuciones de investigadores de Ecuador y España alrededor de la temática de las transformaciones de los mercados lácteos, y sus conexiones con los agentes productivos y los consumidores. Los textos son ilustrativos de las preocupaciones que enmarcan el trabajo del grupo DIAGTER, con sede en el CESOT, Facultad de Ciencias Económicas, Universidad de Buenos Aires.
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Ouvrage papier édité en décembre 2015. Existe également en ouvrage électronique
Thesis
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Cette thèse déchiffre les défis rencontrés par les petits producteurs dans l'approvisionnement alimentaire urbain dans les Andes du Nord en Équateur, avec une étude de la structure et du fonctionnement du système d'approvisionnement urbain en produits laitiers à l'échelle nationale. Les stratégies de production et de commercialisation des petits producteurs sont observées au niveau local à travers deux exemples: Machachi et Nono. Le système d'approvisionnement est analysé comme un réseau spatial où les zones de production, les points de vente et de consommation sont interconnectés, ceci générant des dynamiques dialectiques de transformation mutuelle il travers les interactions des différents acteurs. Historiquement, le système s'est structuré en fonction des besoins et des caractéristiques des producteurs de moyenne et grande taille. Cependant, au cours des dernières décennies, les petits producteurs sont devenus des acteurs essentiels grâce à des stratégies entre les villes et la campagne. L'incorporation des petits producteurs dans cette dynamique montre leur grande capacité d'adaptation face aux opportunités générées par un marché en pleine croissance. Malgré tout, leur interaction avec les autres acteurs dénote une inégalité dans les relations de pouvoir qui reste encore peu modifiée. D'autres modalités d'intégration des petits producteurs restent à construire.
Article
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The growth of the number of economic alternative experiences to the capital from the last years of the decade of 1990 in Argentina, has had his correspondence in a wide bibliographical production that describes and seeks to explain this process, simultaneously that think about the design of political and economic autonomous projects. Nevertheless, these writings show a limited reference to the spatial dimension which is a central aspect for the emergence of these practices and object of affectation for a better development of the same ones in the future. Because of that, in this work we propose to recover diverse looks that contact the Social and Solidarity Economy, and the Geography, in order to grant major relevancy to this dialog at the moment of imagining a social organization that points at the extended reproduction of the life. For it, before we will approach in a brief way the relation between this economic view based on the asociativismo and the cooperativism, and the traditional economy.
Article
Conventional wisdom has it that the food economy has transitioned from organized to disorganized capitalism. An era of extensive state intervention between around 1930 and 1980 would have been followed by an era of deregulation and increasing coordination through markets after around 1980. This article uses the case of Spain's dairy chain to propose an alternative view. In the case under study, there certainly were elements of state‐coordinated capitalism between 1952 and 1986, as well as elements of deregulation and liberalization from 1986 onwards. However, the structure of economic coordination involved some combination of market and nonmarket mechanisms all the way through. The organized capitalism of the first period was not really so tightly organized, whereas much of its later “disorganization” was in fact a transition towards a different mode of “organization”: one in which the control of nonmarket coordination shifted from political to corporate hierarchies.
Article
The rise of a mass, agri‐industrial diet after the Second World War was crucial for the culmination of the nutritional transition that western countries had been involved in since the second half of the nineteenth century—but why did the industrial diet triumph? This article takes the massification of dairy consumption in Spain 1965–90 as a study case. Using a newly constructed database and qualitative material within an evolutionary socio‐economic framework, the article reaches two conclusions. First, the massification of dairy consumption was linked to most households’ transition to a softer budget constraint, which was driven mainly by increasing household incomes (and only secondarily by consumer price reductions caused by food industrialization). Second, the reason why the softening of the budget constraint played such a major role was that it was joined by a substantial increase in consumer trust in dairy products, which in turn resulted from industrial standardization. The article is in line with recent work that underlines the dietary change brought about by food industrialization, but questions whether the latter's major contribution was of a quantitative, price‐related nature and suggests that more attention should be paid to the qualitative, preferences‐related dimension.
Article
Prior to the mid-1960s, dairy products—one of the main carriers of the so-called nutritional transition—were not a major element in the Spanish diet. Through an analysis of the obstacles to the expansion of dairy consumption in the 1950s and early 1960s, this article argues that consumer preferences, and not only low consumer incomes or a poorly developed dairy chain, mattered. Even though Spanish consumers were not hostile toward dairy products (at a time of intense propaganda efforts by physicians, agribusinesses, and the state), their preferences were selective. As the cases of raw milk, powdered milk, and cheese show, consumers' lack of enthusiasm about the characteristics of much of the dairy produce that was available to them hampered the expansion of consumption at a time when their economic situation was clearly improving. This suggests that the progress of the nutritional transition was not necessarily an outcome of changes in consumer income and food production, but depended instead on an appropriate fitting of such changes with the evolution of consumer perceptions about food quality.
Article
This article analyses the diffusion of milk consumption in Spain between 1865 and 1980, and uses a new statistical approach to estimate consumer groups and their milk consumption. This new methodology shows that these variables increased at different speeds chronologically and geographically. Two main phases can be distinguished in terms of the diffusion of milk consumption. The first phase, between the mid-19th century and the 1950s, was characterised by concentrated consumption in producer regions and big cities and the persistence of stark differences between regions. The second, between the 1950s and the 1980s, was chiefly characterised by an increase in the total number of consumers and the disappearance of these regional differences.