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Matrix Reloaded: Replikation des Matrix-Experiments mit Variation der psychologischen Variablen

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The question of whether the "paranormal" actually exists has occupied science for over a century. But regardless of the effects found, which cannot be explained by chance, nothing could be said so far about the genesis of paranormal phenomena. However, Generalized Quantum Theory (GQT), which derives from quantum mechanics, may make scientific understanding possible for the first time. The core assumption of the model involves that paranormal phenomena are based on non-local correlations (entanglement). To test this thesis, the so-called matrix experiment was developed. Based on a micro-psychokinesis experiment, both psychological variables (key presses) and physical variables (outputs of the random number generator) are recorded and correlated. If the experimental correlation matrix shows a larger number of significant correlations than in the control matrix, which is created without participants, a "PK effect" (entanglement correlations) is present. This "PK effect" has been successfully demonstrated in five studies to date. The aim of the present study was to provide further findings on the validity of the assumptions of GQT in an independent replication of the matrix experiment. The predictions were further tested under a more stringent condition by correlating the physical variables with psychological variables from questionnaire surveys (states), where technically induced correlations could be completely ruled out. This was done according to agreed replication conventions.
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