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The Multiplication of Inherited Defects and Its Impact on the Emergence of New Spatial Conflicts. Evidences from Post-socialist Sofia

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This book presents cross-national insights into spatial fragmentation in post-socialist cities in Europe. Trying to rethink the heritage of the last 30 years of transformation and grasp current processes taking urban units of various categories as examples, the book exemplifies typical or unique causes of political, social and ethnic disintegration of cities in Central and Eastern Europe. Presenting spatial studies into different cases of conflict in a cross-national context, the authors apply concepts of contested and divided cities, urban geopolitics, cultural atavism, contested heritage, etc. The book is divided into four parts. The first part raises the issue of genesis, development and contemporary discrepancies of cities divided by political and state borders. The second part includes chapters which deal with the impact of ongoing geopolitical divisions, wars, and ideologies on the social and political tensions as well as their polarising effect on urban territory. The third part comprises reflections on controversial relations of ethnic and national culture with urban space. The fourth part deals with socio-economic transformation of post-socialist cities which went through transition of old patterns of spatial planning and attempts to establish more rational and justice spatial order.
... Although similar circumstances could be seen in the surrounding countries after the 1990s and the housing privatization process [70][71][72], research shows that in some countries of the region, post-socialist housing has many advantages over housing from the socialist period and is of higher quality [73,74]. With regard to the sense of neighborhood, some authors claim that neighboring networks, neighborhood attachment and commitment could be described as quite high in the countries of the region [75][76][77]. ...
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