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Enhancing User Experience in Public Spaces by Measuring Passengers' Flow and Perception Through ICT: The Case of the Municipal Market of Chania

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Abstract

This research investigates user spatial experience transformations that occur in hyperconnected public spaces and transform them to hybrid spaces. Following this target, the authors conduct an experiment in the Municipal Market of Chania, Crete, in which they evaluate user behaviors on a population of 33 participants comparing their spatial experiences before and after the use of ICT. Through qualitative and quantitative methods (the use of the technology Indoor Atlas as well as questionnaires), the authors analyze behavioral change among users with and without access to Crete 3D, an online ICT-based innovative informative platform, aiming to establish a theoretical framework of understanding user interaction with built space. This process enables knowledge transfer in a twofold way: the authors present how to use metrics to evaluate user-building interaction and how users can quickly gain a deep understanding of the building in use.

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