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Social Media Management by Climate Change Organizations for Public Relations

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Abstract

Climate change is a global phenomenon, as its outcomes affect people and societies around the world. Groups of scientists and environmentalists have established climate change organizations (CCOs) in order to organize collective actions. These organizations carry out communication functions to increase public awareness about the risks of climate change and the importance of mitigating actions. Climate change organizations use various dissemination mediums for spreading information regarding climate action and maintaining public relations (PR), social media being one of those mediums. The phenomenal growth in the number of social media users has rendered its penetration to over 50% of the global population. This chapter elaborates on how social media could be used by CCOs to build stronger PR and build trusted communities. Particular focus was laid on: the PR and the dissemination content; social media communities; various social media platforms, its users and type of content; and metrics to measure the performance of content.

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