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The effect of fluoride on the physiology of the pineal gland.

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Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Surrey, 1997.
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... However, only 3 studies have published results describing the relationship between exposure to fluoride and physiological index of pubertal development. An animal study from birth through 28 weeks (Luke 1997) revealed that sexual maturation in 24 female Mongolian gerbils occurred earlier in high-fluoride group (3.7 mg/kg/day) (79% versus 42% having vaginal opening at 7 weeks and 70% versus 16% having differentiated ventral glands at 11.5 weeks) versus low-fluoride group (0.7 mg/kg/day). Moreover, lower testicular weight was observed in the highfluoride group versus low-fluoride group at 16 weeks in male Mongolian gerbils (Luke 1997). ...
... An animal study from birth through 28 weeks (Luke 1997) revealed that sexual maturation in 24 female Mongolian gerbils occurred earlier in high-fluoride group (3.7 mg/kg/day) (79% versus 42% having vaginal opening at 7 weeks and 70% versus 16% having differentiated ventral glands at 11.5 weeks) versus low-fluoride group (0.7 mg/kg/day). Moreover, lower testicular weight was observed in the highfluoride group versus low-fluoride group at 16 weeks in male Mongolian gerbils (Luke 1997). An ecological study of 405 girls aged 7-18 years who had been exposed to fluoridated water up to 10 years showed that the average age at menarche was 12 years among girls in fluoridated Newburgh, New York (0.01-0.2 mg/kg/day), versus 12 years 5 months among girls in essential fluoride free Kingston (0.001-0.02 mg/kg/day) (Schlesinger et al. 1956). ...
... The association between fluoride and physical markers of pubertal onset observed in this study did not reach statistical significance at p=0.05; therefore, we were not able to establish a positive association of fluoride with initiation of puberty as suggested in previous animal and human studies (Farkas et al. 1983;Luke 1997;Schlesinger et al. 1956). The proposed mechanism is that higher fluoride exposures increase the release of gonadotropins and subsequently stimulate sex hormones by reducing the production of melatonin in pineal gland, eventually accelerate the development of puberty in girls (Attanasio et al. 1985;Garcia-Patterson et al. 1996;Waldhauser et al. 1988). ...
Thesis
Puberty is one of the most important developmental milestones in life, involving complex physical and psychological changes. A trend towards earlier puberty has been well documented since the early 20th century. The decline in the pubertal age requires special attention due to its implications for long-term health outcomes with increased risks of reproductive cancers, type-2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and psychological sequelae, and hence is a major public health concern. Increasing evidence suggests that environmental chemicals and nutrition may contribute to the trend towards earlier sexual maturation. Exposures that occur at susceptible developmental periods may impact the prenatal growth trajectory and development of the reproductive axis and potentially have long-term effects on the tempo of maturation later in life. Therefore, it is of public health importance to examine these modifiable elements at early life to improve the understanding of pubertal disorders and their link to adverse health conditions. The objectives of this dissertation were to determine whether exposures to environmental chemicals such as fluoride, lead and nutritional factors such as micronutrients at multiple life stages including in utero, early childhood and peripuberty are potential determinants of sexual maturation by using mother-offspring pairs from the Early Life Exposure in Mexico to ENvironmental Toxicants (ELEMENT) cohorts. We found that prenatal fluoride exposure during pregnancy was not associated with development of secondary sex characteristics directly, but associated with reduced peripubertal serum testosterone in boys and with increased peripubertal serum IGF-1 (insulin-like growth factor 1) in girls. Increased maternal consumption of selenium and zinc during pregnancy was related to advanced pubic hair growth, and increased maternal consumption of phosphorus and riboflavin during pregnancy was related to advanced genital development in boys. A significant negative association of prenatal and early childhood lead exposure with pubertal development was observed in girls. Our findings suggest that fluoride, lead, and intakes of micronutrients during early life may have long-term impacts on development of sexual maturation in adolescents, particularly in a sex-specific fashion. This work highlights the need for more research to examine associations between environmental factors during sensitive periods of development and sexual maturation to better understand pubertal disorders and their long-term consequences.
... In humans, the pineal gland is subject to calcification and forms concretions. This calcification varies between individuals, but generally increases with age [9,49]. Sympathetic nervous system innervation forms the major communication between the pineal gland and the superior cervical ganglion [9,50] and may also serve to maintain these concretions [49]. ...
... This calcification varies between individuals, but generally increases with age [9,49]. Sympathetic nervous system innervation forms the major communication between the pineal gland and the superior cervical ganglion [9,50] and may also serve to maintain these concretions [49]. Additionally, these concretions may reflect prior biosynthetic metabolic activity of the gland, resulting from dark exposure, for example [49]. ...
... Sympathetic nervous system innervation forms the major communication between the pineal gland and the superior cervical ganglion [9,50] and may also serve to maintain these concretions [49]. Additionally, these concretions may reflect prior biosynthetic metabolic activity of the gland, resulting from dark exposure, for example [49]. Fluoride accumulates in the pineal gland to a similar degree as in teeth [10] and the pineal gland in older individuals contains more fluoride than any other soft tissue [49]. ...
... In humans, the pineal gland is subject to calcification and forms concretions. This calcification varies between individuals, but generally increases with age [9,49]. Sympathetic nervous system innervation forms the major communication between the pineal gland and the superior cervical ganglion [9,50] and may also serve to maintain these concretions [49]. ...
... This calcification varies between individuals, but generally increases with age [9,49]. Sympathetic nervous system innervation forms the major communication between the pineal gland and the superior cervical ganglion [9,50] and may also serve to maintain these concretions [49]. Additionally, these concretions may reflect prior biosynthetic metabolic activity of the gland, resulting from dark exposure, for example [49]. ...
... Sympathetic nervous system innervation forms the major communication between the pineal gland and the superior cervical ganglion [9,50] and may also serve to maintain these concretions [49]. Additionally, these concretions may reflect prior biosynthetic metabolic activity of the gland, resulting from dark exposure, for example [49]. Fluoride accumulates in the pineal gland to a similar degree as in teeth [10] and the pineal gland in older individuals contains more fluoride than any other soft tissue [49]. ...
Article
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Background Fluoride from dietary and environmental sources may concentrate in calcium-containing regions of the body such as the pineal gland. The pineal gland synthesizes melatonin, a hormone that regulates the sleep-wake cycle. We examined associations between fluoride exposure and sleep outcomes among older adolescents and adults in Canada. Methods We used population-based data from Cycle 3 (2012–2013) of the Canadian Health Measures Survey. Participants were aged 16 to 79 years and 32% lived in communities supplied with fluoridated municipal water. Urinary fluoride concentrations were measured in spot samples and adjusted for specific gravity (UFSG; n = 1303) and water fluoride concentrations were measured in tap water samples among those who reported drinking tap water (n = 1016). We used multinomial and ordered logistic regression analyses (using both unweighted and survey-weighted data) to examine associations of fluoride exposure with self-reported sleep outcomes, including sleep duration, frequency of sleep problems, and daytime sleepiness. Covariates included age, sex, ethnicity, body mass index, chronic health conditions, and household income. Results Median (IQR) UFSG concentration was 0.67 (0.63) mg/L. Median (IQR) water fluoride concentration was 0.58 (0.27) mg/L among participants living in communities supplied with fluoridated municipal water and 0.01 (0.06) mg/L among those living in non-fluoridated communities. A 0.5 mg/L higher water fluoride level was associated with 34% higher relative risk of reporting sleeping less than the recommended duration for age [unweighted: RRR = 1.34, 95% CI: 1.03, 1.73; p = .026]; the relative risk was higher, though less precise, using survey-weighted data [RRR = 1.96, 95% CI: 0.99, 3.87; p = .05]. UFSG was not significantly associated with sleep duration. Water fluoride and UFSG concentration were not significantly associated with frequency of sleep problems or daytime sleepiness. Conclusions Fluoride exposure may contribute to sleeping less than the recommended duration among older adolescents and adults in Canada.
... One of the most interesting soft tissues able to accumulate fluoride is the pineal gland [1,[52][53][54][55]. However, while knowledge of the calcification of this organ dates back to the 17th century [56], the first reports on its accumulation of fluoride appeared only in the mid-1990s [54]. ...
... 2020, 10, x FOR PEER REVIEW 2 of 10 calcium fluoride in the placenta may impair blood flow through this organ and thus impair fetal nutrition [32,33,50,51]. One of the most interesting soft tissues able to accumulate fluoride is the pineal gland [1,[52][53][54][55]. However, while knowledge of the calcification of this organ dates back to the 17th century [56], the first reports on its accumulation of fluoride appeared only in the mid-1990s [54]. ...
... One of the most interesting soft tissues able to accumulate fluoride is the pineal gland [1,[52][53][54][55]. However, while knowledge of the calcification of this organ dates back to the 17th century [56], the first reports on its accumulation of fluoride appeared only in the mid-1990s [54]. ...
Article
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The pineal gland is an endocrine gland whose main function is the biosynthesis and secretion of melatonin, a hormone responsible for regulating circadian rhythms, e.g., the sleep/wake cycle. Due to its exceptionally high vascularization and its location outside the blood–brain barrier, the pineal gland may accumulate significant amounts of calcium and fluoride, making it the most fluoride-saturated organ of the human body. Both the calcification and accumulation of fluoride may result in melatonin deficiency.
... Jennifer Luke (1997), 15 a British scientist, from the University of Surrey in England reported that the pineal gland is the prime target of the fluoride accumulation. Later her landmark study was substantiated by the similar reports. ...
... Jennifer Luke (1997), 15 a British scientist, from the University of Surrey in England reported that the pineal gland is the prime target of the fluoride accumulation. Later her landmark study was substantiated by the similar reports. ...
... The available evidences suggest that the presence of fluoride reduces the melatonin levels and shortens the time to puberty. 15 Based on this and other evidences the National Research Council (USA) in 2006 declared that the fluoride is likely to cause decreased pineal function. 18 A new form of bio-mineralisation has been studied in the human pineal gland using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (Debbie Edwards). ...
... While there are thousands of articles pointing to the safety of CWF, there is robust evidence on fluoride neurotoxicity. Using the PubMed database and the web site of the journal Fluoride, we found Luke studied the effect of fluoride from drinking water on gerbils during sexual maturation [120]. Animals excreted less melatonin metabolite in their urine and took a shorter time to reach puberty. ...
... The investigators found that girls in Newburgh had menarche earlier than girls in Kingston [123]. The authors suggested an analogy with Luke's observations in gerbils [120]. ...
Article
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Fluoride has been employed in laboratory investigations since the early 20th century. These studies opened the understanding of fluoride interventions to fundamental biological processes. Millions of people living in endemic fluorosis areas suffer from various pathological disturbances. The practice of community water fluoridation used prophylactically against dental caries increased concern of adverse fluoride effects. We assessed the publications on fluoride toxicity until June 2020. We present evidence that fluoride is an enzymatic poison, inducing oxidative stress, hormonal disruptions, and neurotoxicity. Fluoride in synergy with aluminum acts as a false signal in G protein cascades of hormonal and neuronal regulations in much lower concentrations than fluoride acting alone. Our review shows the impact of fluoride on human health. We suggest focusing the research on fluoride toxicity to the underlying integrative networks. Ignorance of the pluripotent toxic effects of fluoride might contribute to unexpected epidemics in the future.
... • Magnetic forces attract fluoride to the pineal gland (Luke 1997 Why this high concentration of Fluoride in the pineal is still an enigma. ...
Presentation
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This presentation along with commentary is available on YouTube > webinar 1 - Pineal gland: Glimpse into the marvels of nature. The presentation includes scientific facts about the Pineal land with reference to the Third Eye, God organ, Eye of Shiva, Eye of Dongma, Seat of the soul, God organ, Pineal eye etc. The minerals in the pineal gland are mentioned in detail with photo transduction, photo luminance, magnetocepter properties and effect of UV light, Infrared light and solar flare.
... Além do referido anteriormente, o fósforo desempenha papel fundamental na estrutura do DNA e do RNA e também está envolvido na eliminação dos produtos ácidos finais provenientes do metabolismo energético; nos rins, os íons de hidrogênio são eliminados com o auxílio do fósforo, participando assim do fundamental controle do pH no nosso organismo (4) . O fósforo também atua no metabolismo energético de proteínas, lipídios e carboidratos, assim como no controle das funções nervosas e musculares, estando justamente neste ponto umas das principais questões que envolvem a ligação com o flúor: a atrofia de uma de nossas principais glândulas, a pineal, com a consequente inibição da produção normal de hormônios que regulam os sistemas vivos em todo o corpo (22) . ...
Technical Report
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humanidade. Antes dele prevalecia a Alquimia, que, de forma subjetiva, interpretava os fenômenos do Universo combinando elementos da Química, Antropologia, Astrologia, Magia, Filosofia, Matemática Misticismo e Religião, sendo praticada na Mesopotâmia, Egito Antigo, Mundo Islâmico, América Latina Pré-histórica, Coréia, China, Grécia, Europa e mesmo entre os aborígenes. A Ciência Alquímica enxergava as substâncias inorgânicas como seres vivos, compostos por corpo e alma; acreditava-se que as características e propriedades de uma substância eram determinadas por seu espírito. Além disso, havia a crença na transmutação ou transferência do espírito de um metal nobre para a matéria de metais comuns. Isto contribuiu para a busca da "Pedra Filosofal", com a qual qualquer substância poderia ser transformada em ouro. Os alquimistas tentavam produzi-la em laboratório a partir de matéria-prima mais grosseira. Com esta pedra seria possível obter o Elixir da Imortalidade, capaz de prolongar a vida indefinidamente (1). Foi justamente em busca da Pedra Filosofal que, por "serendipidade" (acaso), o Fósforo (do grego Phosphorus-"portador de luz") foi descoberto. Conta-nos a história que o primeiro registro de sua descoberta data de 344 anos atrás; o Alquimista alemão Henning Brandt, na tentativa de produzir ouro, descobriu o elemento químico fósforo ao destilar uma mistura de urina (fosfato sódico de amônia) e areia, na procura da Pedra Filosofal. Ao vaporizar a ureia, obteve um material branco que brilhava no escuro e ardia como uma chama brilhante (moléculas de vida curta de HPO e P 2 O 2 , as quais emitem um brilho verde fraco no espectro visível) (31). Brandt manteve esta descoberta em segredo por seis anos, após os quais, para superar dificuldades financeiras, vendeu o segredo da produção em troca de um salário fixo. Cem anos depois, o químico sueco Karl Scheele descobriu um processo, semelhante à pasteurização, que permitiu a produção de fósforo em larga escala e colocou a Suécia como líder mundial em produtos luminíferos (1). Uma curiosidade em relação a essas descobertas é que, antes mesmo do trabalho de Brandt, as propriedades do fósforo já eram conhecidas, porém de maneira empírica: por volta do Século XI, alquimistas chineses inventaram a pólvora, que é uma mistura de enxofre, carvão vegetal e salitre (KNO 3), este, obtido da urina humana (2). Os acontecimentos citados anteriormente mostram que o imprevisível faz parte da própria natureza do empreendimento científico, seja ele no universo que permeia a magia alquímica ou na disciplina científica atual, pondo seu talento a serviço de ideologias variadas, como veremos no caso do fósforo, sem se preocupar com o conteúdo futuro da qualidade delas, sendo assim considerada uma "ciência sem consciência". Assim, sabe-se que a função da ciência consiste em nos fornecer uma representação do mundo, dos seres e das coisas que responda a determinadas exigências; seria a possibilidade de passarmos para lá dos aspectos dos objetos, da sua aparência e avançarmos mais fundo, de modo a nos libertarmos, tanto quanto possível, das ilusões da natureza dos sentidos que nosso cérebro nos impõe (3). Essa dicotomia constatada na academia através da investigação é um processo sem fim e em
... Few studies have been conducted on whether fluoride accumulation significantly disrupts pineal gland activity. The key study, conducted in 1997, reported that prepubescent gerbils fed 40 ppm (2 mM) NaF daily had lower melatonin production by the pineal gland than the controls, but that melatonin was restored to normal concentrations when the gerbils reached adulthood (Luke 1997). Patients with skeletal fluorosis (the most severe form of fluoride toxicity), are sometimes found to have secondary hyperparathyroidism (Teotia and Teotia 1973). ...
Article
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Fluoride is ubiquitously present throughout the world. It is released from minerals, magmatic gas, and industrial processing, and travels in the atmosphere and water. Exposure to low concentrations of fluoride increases overall oral health. Consequently, many countries add fluoride to their public water supply at 0.7–1.5 ppm. Exposure to high concentrations of fluoride, such as in a laboratory setting often exceeding 100 ppm, results in a wide array of toxicity phenotypes. This includes oxidative stress, organelle damage, and apoptosis in single cells, and skeletal and soft tissue damage in multicellular organisms. The mechanism of fluoride toxicity can be broadly attributed to four mechanisms: inhibition of proteins, organelle disruption, altered pH, and electrolyte imbalance. Recently, there has been renewed concern in the public sector as to whether fluoride is safe at the current exposure levels. In this review, we will focus on the impact of fluoride at the chemical, cellular, and multisystem level, as well as how organisms defend against fluoride. We also address public concerns about fluoride toxicity, including whether fluoride has a significant effect on neurodegeneration, diabetes, and the endocrine system.
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