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Työelämäpedagogiikka-korkeakoulutuksessa

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Tervetuloa tutustumaan työelämäpedagogiikan moninaisuuteen! Tämä kirja on toteutettu opetus- ja kulttuuriministeriön tukeman Työelämäpedagogiikka korkeakoulutuksessa (Työpeda) -hankkeen lopputuotoksena. Tarkoituksena on jakaa hankkeessa pilotoituja toimintatapoja, välineitä ja malleja kaikkien korkeakoulujen käyttöön. Työelämäpedagogiikka on määritelty hankkeessa laajasti niin, että se kattaa opiskelijoiden työelämätaitojen kehittämisen ohella myös ohjaukseen, opetussuunnitelmatyöhön sekä tutkimus-, kehittämis- ja innovaatiotoimintaan sisältyvän työelämänäkökulman. Niinpä tämä kirjakin on jäsennetty näiden teemojen mukaisesti. Jokaiseen teemaan liittyen on toteutettu erilaisia pilotteja, joiden vetäjät nostavat esiin kehittämistyön keskeisiä tuotoksia. Kirjan alussa, ennen pilottien esittelyä, kuvataan hankkeen teoreettisia taustoja. Työpeda-hankkeeseen on osallistunut kaikkiaan kymmenen yliopistoa ja kuusi ammattikorkeakoulua. Innostuneet ja innovatiiviset tiimit ovat mahdollistaneet kaiken sen rikkaan kehitystyön, jota kirjassa kuvataan.
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