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Micropolitiques de la marche et inégalités urbaines : une exploration à partir de l’expérience vécue

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Abstract

Urban pedestrian journeys are diverse, complex and difficult to classify: people walk with distinct purposes and different kinds of encounters occur along the way, leading to different social and subjective negotiations. The everyday act of putting one foot in front of the other has a political dimension that requires specific tools to be grasped and analyzed. This article proposes exploring and describing the lived experience of walking as a way of envisaging the micropolitics that transpires while people move by foot. By observing rhythm and attention variations within pedestrian journeys in Santiago de Chile, we address the experiential dimension of urban inequalities. We contribute, thus, with an understanding of how inequalities embed themselves in everyday practices, enabling or constraining walkers’ capacities for acting and their possibilities for experiencing the city.

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... Investing in active travel is increasingly recognized as an essential strategy for reducing transport carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions [1][2][3] as well as improving public-health outcomes, such as reducing levels of cardiac disease, diabetes, cancer and respiratory illness [4,5]. Notwithstanding the growing interest from policy makers in expanding active-transportation infrastructure, greater attention is needed to mobility related inequalities [6][7][8][9][10][11][12]. Although the modal share of active travel has declined with the rise of automobility, walking remains one of the most common physical activities globally, and the most prevalent form of transportation in many cities of the Global South [13], especially for women and low-income commuters [14,15]. ...
... Building on calls for greater attention to the social-justice dimensions of sustainable transitions [19,23,28,29], this paper contributes to critical research aiming to rethink urban (infra)structure to address the tremendous social and physical challenges that active commuters face in car-dominated cities [12,[30][31][32]. Specifically, we assess recent discussions on 'footbridges,' also commonly referred to as 'foot over bridges,' 'pedestrian overpasses,' 'grade-separated pedestrian systems' and 'skywalk facilities.' Urban 'footbridges' are typically constructed above (and on occasion below) roads with the intention of eliminating pedestrian flows in areas designated for motor vehicles [33]. ...
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