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"A Model of Creating the Characteristics of Form through a Neurologic Analysis - characteristics of form in architecture -"

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The existing principles of form are not specific enough to be employed as tool for creating formas they tend to focus on its psychological effects. The recent literature in neuroaesthetics alsolacks a specific theory of form creation that can be empirically tested, limiting itself inviewer-centered analyses of basic elements or critical analyses. This study aims to present apractical framework that can be applied when creating the characteristics of form by identifyingthem based on scientific theories. We explore the discipline of cognitive neuroscience thatunderstands the human cognitive system centered on the anatomical function. In a similar vein,we also take a detailed look at the field of neural aesthetics that uses a scientific method toinvestigate aesthetic experiences and aesthetic behaviors. In this study, we first analyze thevisual system from the eye to the brain and identify the components of shape to be read in theearlier visual processing stage. Then, the meaning of ‘characteristics of form’ is clarified bydrawing a clear distinction between ‘characteristics of form’ and ‘shape’ based on theoreticalconsiderations and the existing literature. This research suggests a practical model of creatingthe characteristics of form that can be empirically tested by identifying how each characteristic ofform corresponds to the different levels of the cognitive processing model dictated by cognitiveneuroscience. The feasibility of the model is tested by analyzing texts of the architects in the128 buildings that selected by vote of the subscribers in the global website. The analysis showsthat one can draw a clear distinction between the level that perceives shape and that makes adeliberate aesthetic judgement in human senses. This implies that there are distinctive levels incharacteristics of form matching each stage of the cognitive processing.
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