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Abstract

Mixed reality (MR) is a cutting-edge technology at the forefront of many new applications in the tourism and cultural heritage sector. This study aims to reshape the museum experience by creating a highly engaging and immersive museum experience for visitors combing real-time visual, audio information and computer-generated images (CGI) with museum artefacts and customer displays. This research introduces a theoretical framework that assesses the potential of MR guidance system in usefulness, ease of use, enjoyment, interactivity, touring and future applications. The evaluation introduces the MuseumEye MR application in the Egyptian Museum, Cairo using mixed method surveys and a sample of 171 participants. The results of the questionnaire highlighted the importance of the mediating the role of the tour guide in enhancing the relationship between; perceived usefulness, ease of use, multimedia, UI design, interactivity, and the intention of use. Furthermore, the results of this study revealed the potential future use of MR in museums and ensured sustainability and engagement past the traditional visitor museum experience, which heightens the economic state of museums and cultural heritage sectors. 3
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Virtual Reality (2021) 25:895–918
https://doi.org/10.1007/s10055-020-00497-9
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
A framework forconstructing andevaluating therole ofMR
asaholographic virtual guide inmuseums
RamyHammady1,2 · MinhuaMa3 · ZiadAL‑Kalha4 · CarlStrathearn5
Received: 6 July 2020 / Accepted: 7 December 2020 / Published online: 5 January 2021
© The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer-Verlag London Ltd. part of Springer Nature 2021
Abstract
Mixed reality (MR) is a cutting-edge technology at the forefront of many new applications in the tourism and cultural heritage
sector. This study aims to reshape the museum experience by creating a highly engaging and immersive museum experi-
ence for visitors combing real-time visual, audio information and computer-generated images with museum artefacts and
customer displays. This research introduces a theoretical framework that assesses the potential of MR guidance system in
usefulness, ease of use, enjoyment, interactivity, touring and future applications. The evaluation introduces the MuseumEye
MR application in the Egyptian Museum, Cairo using mixed method surveys and a sample of 171 participants. The results
of the questionnaire highlighted the importance of the mediating the role of the tour guide in enhancing the relationship
between perceived usefulness, ease of use, multimedia, UI design, interactivity and the intention of use. Furthermore, the
results of this study revealed the potential future use of MR in museums and ensured sustainability and engagement past
the traditional visitor museum experience, which heightens the economic state of museums and cultural heritage sectors.
Keywords Mixed reality· Virtual guide· Museums· Holographic system· Microsoft HoloLens
1 Introduction
With the advent of virtual reality (VR) and augmented real-
ity (AR) in the cultural heritage domain over the last two
decades (Fenu and Pittarello 2018; Schaper etal. 2018;
Sylaiou etal. 2010). These technologies have enhanced the
visitor experience and reshaped the traditional physical bor-
ders with the creation of innovative windows into the past,
present and future (Trunfio etal. 2020). The application of
AR in museums enhances and visualises essential visitor
information and increase interaction with other technologies
and multimedia elements (Antlej etal. 2018). Moreover, AR
technologies propagate longer exhibit and display interac-
tions and instigate greater visceral learning than the typical
museum experience (Pujol etal. 2012).
Significantly, virtual museum guides enhance engage-
ment and social interaction between visitors (Kopp etal.
2005). These virtual guides can increase the attendance and
attention of museum visitors (Burgard etal. 1999; Rzayev
etal. 2019) and increase the economic state of tourism as a
vital source of income (Rosentraub and Joo 2009). Typically,
museums employ communication systems that include send-
ers, receivers and channels of communication which facili-
tate the transmission of verbal and non-verbal information
Supplementary Information The online version of this article
(https ://doi.org/10.1007/s1005 5-020-00497 -9) contains
supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.
* Ramy Hammady
Ramy.Hammady@solent.ac.uk;
Ramy_Hammady@a-arts.helwan.edu.eg
Minhua Ma
m.ma@falmouth.ac.uk
Ziad AL-Kalha
Z.kalha@ju.edu.jo
Carl Strathearn
C.strathearn@napier.ac.uk
1 Solent University, E Park Terrace, SouthamptonSO140YN,
UK
2 Helwan University, Al Sikka Al Hadid Al Gharbeya, Al
Masaken Al Iqtisadeyah, Helwan, CairoGovernorate, Egypt
3 Falmouth University, Penryn Campus, Treliever Road,
PenrynTR109FE, UK
4 University ofJordan, School ofBusiness, Queen Rania
Street, Amman, Jordan
5 Edinburgh Napier University, Unit 4, 10 Bankhead Terrace,
EdinburghEH114DY, UK
Content courtesy of Springer Nature, terms of use apply. Rights reserved.
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