Chapter

Gastric ulcer

Authors:
To read the full-text of this research, you can request a copy directly from the author.

Abstract

We will briefly describe what gastric ulcer is, also known as peptic ulcers, so we can subsequently analyze the different psychosomatic theories on its origin and maintenance. Ulcers are lesions on the skin, or mucous membrane - lining of the stomach (gastric ulcer), in the duodenum (duodenal ulcer), or in the esophagus (esophageal ulcer). This coating is necessary against the irritating acids produced by the stomach itself. Usually ulcers affect the first layer of the lining; but complications may occur with bleeding (digestive hemorrhage) expelled through bowel movements or vomiting with blood, which can lead to anemia; and can even pierce the stomach called perforated ulcer. The symptoms are the appearance of a pain in the upper part of the abdomen, half an hour to an hour after eating; accompanied on occasion of nausea, vomiting and heartburn (feeling of burning in the stomach); this pain can be sustained for weeks, being perceived with greater intensity during the night. Regarding the causes, they can be either bacterial infections or tumors. Although there is a biological component that predisposes the person to this condition, in most cases it’s caused by inappropriate habits, such as prolonged intake of some nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (iatrogenesis), usually ingesting alcoholic beverages and smoking tobacco.

No full-text available

Request Full-text Paper PDF

To read the full-text of this research,
you can request a copy directly from the author.

ResearchGate has not been able to resolve any citations for this publication.
ResearchGate has not been able to resolve any references for this publication.