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Teachers’ online teaching expectations and experiences during the Covid19-pandemic in the Netherlands

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Teachers’ online teaching expectations and experiences during the Covid19-pandemic in the Netherlands

Abstract

The COVID19-Pandemic has forced educators to transform their lessons into online versions in a short period of time. This study compares teachers’ perception regarding their online teaching expectations (prior to the transition to remote teaching) and experiences (after a month of online teaching). Two surveys were completed by 200 Dutch teachers. Results demonstrated a significant change in the perception of teachers regarding their resolutions to implement technology in their lessons in a post-corona era. In this regard, teachers’ gender and prior experiences with the use of ICT seem to play a small role. Findings of this study provide implications for the professionalisation of teachers, such as characteristics of teachers and intentions to implement technology in teaching, as well as experienced positive and negative aspects of online teaching. Future research should focus on constructing and testing educational design principles for effective professionalisation of teachers in adopting technology in their educational practices.
... Few studies on the subject in the literature mostly rely on student views in undergraduate and postgraduate education (B. Demir, Yılmaz, & Celik, 2021;Hewitt, 2020;Mahasneh, Al-kreimeen, Alrammana, & Murad, 2021;Öz, 2021) and teacher opinions (Basaran et al., 2021;Demir, & Kale, 2020;Halasa et al., 2020;Hjelsvold, Nykvist, Lorås, Bahmani, & Krokan, 2020;Juárez-Díaz & Perales, 2021;Özdoğan & Berkant , 2020;Van der Spoel, Noroozi, Schuurink, & van Ginkel, 2020). The participants in this study consist of teachers working in lower-level educational institutions. ...
... However, according to a study by Hsu (2011), teachers should use ICT to make their classroom environments more flexible and productive (Hsu, 2011). It is thought that this will only happen if teachers learn to use technology and integrate it into the lessons effectively (Amhag, Hellström, & Stigmar, 2019;Uerz, Volman, & Kral, 2018;Van der Spoel et al., 2020). ...
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The aim of this research is to determine the technology use skills of teachers before and after distance education. This study is a descriptive research in the cross-sectional survey model. The multi-stage sampling method was used in the selection of the teachers participating in the research. Percentage, frequency and content analysis techniques were used in the analysis process of the data obtained from the interviews with the teachers. According to the teachers' views on the frequency of using technology after the pandemic, technology is frequently used in learning environments. They also stated that the application they use most in their courses is EBA. According to the findings, it has been suggested that teachers receive in-service training in online education.
... As it has been previously expounded, COVID-19 brought irreversible changes for the future of citizens, who are the most vulnerable collectives especially affected [12]. Thus, rethinking educational practices based on sustainability is essential [16], as SDGs still need to be achieved [40]. However, the popularity of sustainability as a research topic is slightly below the average of the rest (10.76%). ...
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COVID-19 has caused many difficulties worldwide, education being one of the most affected areas. This research aims to disseminate the research trends about education in the context of COVID-19 in Spain. Through a systematic review, all research works about this topic in the Spanish context, that were published between 2020–2022 in national and international high-impact journals, have been analysed. After analysing 242 articles, the results show: (a) the keywords that were used most frequently: “learning” (93); “teaching” (53); “higher education” (43); “pandemic” (30); “competence” (29); and “ICT” (22); (b) research trends, which can be categorised as the following topics, among others: “ICT and Digitalisation”; “Teaching, Learning, and Innovative methodologies”; “Educational Policies”; “Sustainability”; “Acquisition and Development of Skills and Competences”; “Health and Welfare”; (c) that the most popular topic in educational research in Spain was “Teaching, Learning, and Innovative Methodologies” (19.30%), followed by “ICT and Digitalisation” (18.04%), whereas articles about educational policies were a minority (2.85%); (d) that in Spanish educational research, articles about formal education have been the most popular (86.36%), followed by articles about non-formal education (7.02%) and articles about informal education (6.62%). Consequently, the scientific community has highlighted the impact of the pandemic on education, especially in relation to “Teaching, Learning, and Innovative Methodologies”.
... At this point, it can be stated that teachers should be prepared for online education as well as for formal education during the undergraduate education process before starting the profession. As a matter of fact, it is emphasized that the integration of technologysupported teaching into teacher training programs has a positive effect on the use of technology in the teaching of future teachers ( Van der Spoel et al., 2020). It is suggested that dimensions such as focusing on the integration of technology, facilitating interaction, monitoring students and emphasizing the difference in methodology and pedagogy between online and offline teaching, time efficiency and monitoring students' learning processes online should be included in teacher education programs (Kožuh, Maksimović, & Osmanović Zajić, 2021). ...
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This study aimed to examine the online teaching experiences and perceptions of pre-service teachers in an online learning environment. In this case study designed research, the problems that may arise for the instructors in the online teaching process and possible solution suggestions to these problems were determined based on the online teaching experiences of the pre-service teachers. A total of 22 students, 10 of whom were moderators for the online teaching experience, and 12 students who listened and evaluated the training given by the moderator students, participated in the study from two different departments of a state university. The moderator teacher candidates were assigned to the study rooms within the scope of the learning activity called techno-party and had the experience of teaching their peers online for 20 minutes. After the implementation process, semi-structured interviews were conducted with the teacher candidates. Content analysis was carried out on the interview data obtained from the participants and the researcher observation notes. The codes that emerged as a result of the content analysis were grouped under four themes. The first theme is the experiences of pre-service teachers on online teaching, the second theme is their suggestions for solutions to the problems they have experienced / may experience in the online environment, the third theme is their views on the professional contribution of this experience, and the fourth theme is their views on the content of a program that can be given on online teacher education in the future.
... In contrast with our results, Mishra et al. (2020) found that the pandemic had been a good opportunity to evolve into a more digitalized education. Van der Spoel et al. (2020) discovered that teachers forced to teach remotely helped them had become more professional, as they were more aware of the teaching possibilities educational technology offers. Nevertheless, respondents admitted that the situation derived from the COVID-19 outbreak has made them reflect on remote/online education as an alternative to traditional teaching in the case that something similar happens again, similar to the findings by Jegede (2020). ...
Chapter
One of the sectors that has been deeply affected by the COVID-19 pandemic is education: teachers and students have been forced to change the way they communicate, interact, teach, and learn during and after the lockdown derived from the pandemic. The objective of this exploratory mixed-methods study is to examine the perspective of Spanish Primary Education teachers of English working in Córdoba (Spain) on teaching English as a Foreign Language (EFL) both during and after the COVID-19 lockdown. Semi-structured interviews were conducted to identify similarities and contrasts between how English was taught before, during, and after the pandemic. The participants' responses (n = 11) were analyzed and classified in order to explore their views on aspects such as methodologies, materials, assessment tools and criteria, organization with other teachers, relationships with families, and the comeback to regular classes.
... Another challenge is due to the current pandemic situation: Are lecturers' levels of digital skills sufficient to facilitate distance education, and do they enable students to fully benefit from their online study? Several studies reported that one problem is that the methodical reorganization of the educational process, incorporating the use of information technology, has not taken place quickly enough to accommodate the current situation [45][46][47][48][49]. Transforming to online learning in such a short period is difficult, and university lecturers and students, some of whom may not have had any experience with online teaching or learning, have needed to adapt to the changes quickly. ...
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Objective: Learning to teach at the higher education level is not a straightforward path in Slovakia, and there are fewer opportunities to learn how to teach at this level. The paper summarizes selected findings and proposals for improvements related to the implementation of measures in selected areas of higher education institutions (HEI). The aim of the paper was to explore digital competency development in higher education institutions and factors with regard to university lecturers that affect the quality of the educational process in the context of the overall quality of graduates and labor market requirements. In addition, our study aims to fill an information gap and provide original data useful in the process of digital competency development in higher education. Methods/Analysis: The study employed an exploratory mixed-methods design. The data for this study is based on a survey with 24 open and closed questions and an analysis of 46 final thesis studies. Findings: Both the qualitative statements of the university lecturers and the survey shed light on the following: (1) (Re)creation of motivational factors; (2) Potential development of digital competencies; and (3) Supporting innovation in higher education. The results led to consideration of the educational process quality at the level of the subject and the object of education. Novelty/Improvement: The results point to the importance of investment in technology. This is related to improved educational outcomes and sustainable innovation in higher education. Slovak national education policymakers should provide innovative ways to increase the development of digital competencies in higher education institutions through the Recovery Plan for Europe; providing investment in technology related to improved educational outcomes and the development of sustainable innovation in higher education will all help to raise the standard. Doi: 10.28991/ESJ-2022-SIED-011 Full Text: PDF
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Risk is a multidimensional concept, i.e. a term, and as such it is often mistranslated, and thus misunderstood and misinterpreted in practice. The paper gives an etymological review of the concept risk. A number of academic and administrative definitions of the concept (term) risk have been analyzed. Due to the limited size of the paper, the methodology of definition analysis is not presented, but only the results of the analysis used as a basis for one approach to conceptual definition of risk in the context of uncertainty of the outcome of an event with the expected negative consequences, i.e. the conceptual definition of risk determined by the probability and consequences of an event.
Chapter
The COVID-19 pandemic transformed the educational landscape overnight. Face-to-face instruction urgently gave its place to online teaching, forcing educators to adopt tools and techniques they had never used before and creating doubts regarding its effectiveness. However, it also improved teachers' and students' digital skills creating new perceptions towards technology-enhanced teaching. This study maps the use of technology in online FL teaching in Greek Primary Schools during the first COVID-19 lockdown. Using a mixed methods approach, an online questionnaire, and interviews, it records the tools and the ways they were used, the pedagogical choices made, the challenges and the factors that affected the quality of online teaching during the crisis. Based on the lessons learned and the literature, this chapter aims to contribute to sharing the knowledge gained and provide recommendations to the state, schools, and teachers for the preparation and delivery of quality online or blended learning in the future.
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