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Teachers’ online teaching expectations and experiences during the Covid19-pandemic in the Netherlands

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The COVID19-Pandemic has forced educators to transform their lessons into online versions in a short period of time. This study compares teachers’ perception regarding their online teaching expectations (prior to the transition to remote teaching) and experiences (after a month of online teaching). Two surveys were completed by 200 Dutch teachers. Results demonstrated a significant change in the perception of teachers regarding their resolutions to implement technology in their lessons in a post-corona era. In this regard, teachers’ gender and prior experiences with the use of ICT seem to play a small role. Findings of this study provide implications for the professionalisation of teachers, such as characteristics of teachers and intentions to implement technology in teaching, as well as experienced positive and negative aspects of online teaching. Future research should focus on constructing and testing educational design principles for effective professionalisation of teachers in adopting technology in their educational practices.
... education had to shift suddenly to online and all teachers had to adapt their digital skills, even the ones who were not used in doing so before, to educate their students via Zoom or other platforms (Van der Spoel et al., 2020). Teachers had to design this online education within a week and were not guided in how they should do so at the start of the lockdown. ...
... Some studies revealed that student engagement was stimulated online due to diminishing constraints, such as time, peer and test pressure (Anderson, 2008;Filius et al., 2018;Gikandi et al., 2011). However, studies also reported some challenges for teachers in engaging all students in the online FA process, such as facilitating an interactive (feedback) dialogue with students about their learning (Filius et al., 2018;Van der Spoel et al., 2020). In these studies, teachers experience difficulties due to less handles to create small discussions, less student response and less synchronous interaction online. ...
... An explanation for this finding might be that these teachers already found it difficult to stimulate self-and peer assessment in face-to-face education and feel less competent in using these FA strategies (Wylie & Lyon, 2015). Another reason could be that teachers find the sudden shift to online difficult to make and thereby find it difficult to give students more responsibility in the FA process (Hartshorne et al., 2020;Van der Spoel et al., 2020;Wylie & Lyon, 2015). Finally, in line with a study of Beebe et al. ...
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Introduction During the COVID‐19 lockdown in 2020, teachers had to shift their teaching and assessment to online. Formative assessment (FA) can help teachers to engage, guide and monitor students' (online) learning. However, more knowledge is needed of how teachers could use the full FA process online. Methods In this study data from 50 secondary school teachers, who taught different grade levels and subjects and joined a FA learning network that started before and continued during the lockdown, were collected. The study investigates how they used online FA practices differently than face‐to‐face FA, what challenges and opportunities they experienced in online FA and what lessons they learned and intended to keep. This mixed methods study used data from a questionnaire, interviews and webinars that were segmented, coded and analysed. Results Results showed that many teachers implemented new FA strategies and adopted, more often than in their face‐to‐face practice, all the five phases of the FA process in an aligned matter in online FA. Teachers indicated opportunities in stimulating student engagement and guiding and monitoring student learning more at an individual level in the online FA process, but also experienced challenges, mainly in lack of interaction online. Discussion The sudden and necessary shift to online FA, due to the COVID‐19 lockdown, challenged teachers to more fundamentally reconsider their assessment practices and assumptions. Teachers intended to make use of these learned lessons to improve their future (blended) FA practice.
... It is also worth noting that the shift from in-person teaching to online was not smooth. Several studies, mostly from developed contexts (e.g., Folkman et al., 2022;Carrillo & Flores, 2020;Van der Spoel et al., 2020), highlighted how teachers and students experienced multifarious challenges. Research studies (Carrillo & Flores, 2020;Flores & Swennen, 2020;Sepulveda-Escobar & Morrison, 2020;Mishra, Gupta & Shree, 2020) have also attempted to capture experiences of online teaching and learning in universities and schools and teacher education during the Covid-19 pandemic in different parts of the world to ensure the lessons inform future teaching and learning policy and practice. ...
... Whitley et al. (2020) underline how the shift away from in-person teaching allowed learners who did not find school a pleasant nor a rewarding experience the opportunity to engage with learning in a safe environment. Day et al. (2020) and Van der Spoel et al. (2020) capture how the key stakeholders, teachers and students worked in tandem to overcome the challenges posed by the sudden shift in modality and their takeaway lessons for the post-pandemic classroom. Based on comparative lessons from Australia and Finland, Sahlberg (2021) argued that education systems built on trust-based professionalism are less reliant on externally measured standards and provide flexibility and autonomy to adapt the curriculum to local needs and strengths. ...
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As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, educational activities were disrupted globally. In Pakistan, schools were also closed, and though some schools had started teaching online, the staff (including principals and teachers) and students' readiness for education during the pandemic remained unexplored. An internet-based survey was conducted to explore the experiences of the teachers and principals during the lockdown. The survey included both open-ended and closed-ended questions. Responses were collected from respondents in different parts of Pakistan, with the majority coming from Sindh and coming from both the private and public sector. While the respondents from private schools reported that they could teach online, the respondents from government schools could not continue the teaching process during the lockdown phase. School principals focused on acquiring technology for online teaching and offering skills development sessions. They used a variety of methods to monitor teaching and learning. Teachers relied on a mix of synchronous and asynchronous teaching. Infrastructure issues posed numerous challenges. Findings highlight an urgent need for teacher education programmes to incorporate digital literacy development and enhance pedagogical understanding of engaging students in online teaching environments and exploring solutions such as blended learning. The findings also draw our attention to questions of equitable access to quality education for all in Pakistan.
... Covid-19 pandemic makes teachers face challenges in their careers. Teachers need to prepare for their professional development and to be supported in this pandemic situation for lifelong learning and distance learning program (Spoel et al, 2020). Charania et.al (2021) described that a continuous teacher professional development model is continuous, blended, models practice and allows the practice of constructivist pedagogies with technology that can build capacities to seek constructive and adaptive pedagogy and technology solutions and resources more suitable for their different situations. ...
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