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Regenerative Placemaking: Creating a New Model for Place Development by Bringing Together Regenerative and Placemaking Processes

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Abstract

In an effort to create thriving living environments, the regenerative developmentRegenerative development framework has gained recognition as a creative and reflective process that emerges from the uniqueness of a placePlaces to activate and support living systemsLiving systems. Another approach that has a strong engagement with the particularity of placePlaces is the concept of placemakingPlacemaking, a process of developing placesPlaces through the active participation of the citizens that conceive, perceive and live in that placePlaces. Using discourse grounded theory, this chapter explores and analyses these two complementary place-basedPlace-based practices: regenerative developmentRegenerative development and placemakingPlacemaking to identify synergies. We propose the term, ‘regenerative placemakingPlacemaking’, to encapsulate this strategic process of (re)igniting people’s relationship to socio-ecologicalSocio-ecological systems through place-specific temporary activations that act as a testing ground for long term potentialPotentials.

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