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Regenerative Agriculture: Opportunities and Challenges to Catalyze Profitable and Resilient Agriculture in the Context of Climate Change. W/ Case Studies from the Iberian Peninsula

Authors:
  • Life Terra Foundation

Abstract

What is Regenerative Agriculture? Why is it important? What kinds of benefits does it bring? How is it different from normal/conventional agriculture? Can it be financially productive? What kinds of changes need to take place? Where can I start?
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