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Risk and Resilience Management in Co-production

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Abstract

This chapter focuses upon the potential of co-production in research linked to risk and resilience. Specifically, it proposes the need to see resilience practice as co-production and illustrates the argument with reflections from the Waterproofing Data project, which investigated water-related risks, with a focus on social and cultural aspects of data practices. The chapter describes how the project adopted a dialogic approach and developed innovative methods around data practices into a method that reframed citizen sensing as a critical pedagogical process. Here the engagement of residents of urban poor neighbourhoods in Brazil was central for a process of research co-production together with a multidisciplinary research team and stakeholders of local governmental and non-governmental organisations involved in disaster risk reduction. Ultimately, we argue that co-production is a necessary ingredient in research looking to transform governance and decision-making in how we respond, in a flexible way, to risks and crisis.

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