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Theorising Sexuality in Talk

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This chapter provides a theoretical introduction to Online Sex Talk and the Social World, arguing that in order to analyse sexual practices and behaviours in an online community, it can be useful to first frame these within an understanding of the everyday world in relation to social norms, social policing, and transgression. Building on arguments about social norms from sociological theory as well as from diverse branches of feminist and queer theories, this chapter provides a theoretical foundation to the data-driven analysis that follows in the book, contextualising the analysis of covert language use patterns within a system of broader social practices and structures.

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