PosterPDF Available

PhilTheGap: Feel the Gap to Fill the Gap - Philosophy to Trigger Climate Action

Authors:
Poster

PhilTheGap: Feel the Gap to Fill the Gap - Philosophy to Trigger Climate Action

Abstract

Mainstream energy policies define energy security as the uninterrupted availability of energy sources at an affordable price. Concepts of rational use of energy are preferentially marginalized, and renewable energy often assimilated to sustainability without justification. Our world is in fire, the litany of cataclysms already engaged is well known; alas, we don’t act. Why? PhilTheGap gathers competences in environmental and social sciences, philosophy, psychology, pedagogy, finances, economics and political economy as well as in town planning. It will develop and experiment innovative pedagogical tools for energy-climate knowledge dissemination to laypersons as well as for iteration with specialized audiences. Contextualized outreach resources, designed to face people with a reality that is here and will last, will be mobilized in workshops implementing practices of philosophy and psychology and supported by digital applications allowing for discussion structuration, monitoring and dissemination. The project aims at (1) clarifying those gaps between parallel discourses for (2) empowering people for informed decision-making. Shouldn’t the lion share of the transition be found in energy reduction? PhilTheGap provides a platform for creating a shared language to collaboratively imagine and set the foundation of a resilient society capable of scaling back its energy consumption and managing it in a genuinely sustainable manner.
GAP 1
TIME versus QUANTITIES OF ENERGY/EMISSIONS
GAP 2
RENEWABLE IS NOT ENOUGH: SUSTAINABILITY IS A MUST
GAP 3
PSYCHOLOGICAL AND SOCIAL BARRIERS
PHILTHEGAP OUTREACH RESOURCES: SUPPORTS TO BRIDGE THE GAPS
At current emissions rates, the remaining carbon budget for a 1.5°C global
warming will be reached in less than 8 years.
In 2019, global oil, coal and gas consumption exceeded 492 EJ (BP Energy
Outlook 2019). This can be translated into a global capacity of about 15’600
GW. Substituting that amount of energy would take close to 43 years by
installing each day, day in and day out, a 1 GW plant (i.e. a plant with the
capacity of a large nuclear reactor).
What are we willing to keep in a net carbon destination where emissions of
GHG must be reduced to 1 tCO2/capita/yr (i.e. 2.75 kgCO2/capita/day) by
2050?
The complexity and multiplicity of methods for measuring sustainabiliy
result in blurred visions. Life Cycle Sustainability Assessment (LCSA) frame-
works have given rise to a virtually infinite number of sustainability indica-
tors used as proxy measures of multidimensional concepts.
The most common indicator is GHG accounting, commonly referred to as
carbon footprint (CFP). By becoming the main focus of many sustainability
policies among companies and authorities, it brings the risk of shifting prob-
lems, when reduction in CFP are obtained at the expense of increasing
other environmental/societal impacts.
A deeper understanding of sustainability indicators, their boundaries, their
interferences, and their relationship with economy is needed for informed
decision making in the deployment of the future Swiss energy mix.
Despite growing environmental awareness and broad support among global
public opinion for limiting emissions, behavioral changes towards more sus-
tainability are occurring too slowly at all levels of society and in the econo-
my. One common explanation is rooted in human psychology, which shows
that the complex and abstract nature of climate change poses significant
challenge to human cognitive mechanisms.
Locating the barrier at the psychological level may be insufficient and the
broader psychological tendencies should be considered within the complex
interplay of social relations and social structures: Societal and political
actors most relevant for the formulation of energy-climate policies should
be identified, their underlying objectives and assuption spelled-out and the
context determining how a certain objective matters for each actor deter-
mined, for achieving a successful political economy transition framework.
MIND THE GAPS
REFERENCES
Hall, Charles A. S. (2018): Energy Return on Investment. A Unifying Principle for Biology, Economics, and Sustainability. Softcover reprint of the original 1st edition 2017. Cham:
Springer International Publishing; Springer (Lecture Notes in Energy, 36).
Lade, Steven J.; Steen, Will; Vries, Wim de; Carpenter, Stephen R.; Donges, Jonathan F.; Gerten, Dieter et al. (2020): Human impacts on planetary boundaries amplied by Earth
system interactions. In Nat Sustain 3 (2), pp. 119–128. DOI: 10.1038/s41893-019-0454-4.
Steen, Will; Broadgate, Wendy; Deutsch, Lisa; Ganey, Owen; Ludwig, Cornelia (2015a): The trajectory of the Anthropocene: The Great Acceleration. In The Anthropocene Review
2 (1), pp. 81–98. DOI: 10.1177/2053019614564785.
Steen, Will; Richardson, Katherine; Rockström, Johan; Cornell, Sarah E.; Fetzer, Ingo; Bennett, Elena M. et al. (2015b): Sustainability. Planetary boundaries: guiding human develop-
ment on a changing planet. In Science (New York, N.Y.) 347 (6223), p. 1259855. DOI: 10.1126/science.1259855.
SCIENTISTS
&
ECONOMISTS
CITIZENS
&
DECISION MAKERS
APPLIED
PHILOSOPHY
&
PSYCHOLOGY
EDUCATIONAL
TECHNOLOGY
Autonomous and
critical thinking
Relatedness
and rewards
EMPOWERMENT
NEW PARADIGM
NEW PARADIGM
OUTREACH
RESOURCES
AROUND THE BALLOT BOX - abb
As PP dissemination has been hampered by oral-only
interaction-mode, lack of technological support, and no
structuring of information sources. These factors will be
addressed by abb, a multimedia synchronized digital appli-
cation, enabling PP workshops participants to access Phil-
TheGap resources, and handle facts, ideas, hypotheses as building
blocks; ultimately providing a tool to structure, measure, catalog,
monitor and disseminate over time input and outputs of the PP work-
shops discussions.
PHILTHEGAP SERIOUS GAME
Digital games have become an integral part of our
lives. With the aim to reach and commit a wider
audience, PhilTheGap resources will be conceptu-
ally incorporated in a serious game serving self-de-
termination and behavioral change in the energy-transition and net-car-
bon destination.
Based on educational models that have recently emerged, the game bets
on a playful and narrative approach to inspire climate action.
RESILIENCE AND MITIGATION MODULATOR
Mobility
Food supply
Housing
Waste
managment
Financial
Territorial
planning
Direct pressure
indicators
(planetary
boundaries)
Indirect pres-
sure indicators
(human health)
Eco-liberticide
matrix
(Bihouix, 2014)
usefull
useless
hard
easy
MODULATOR
SCENARIOS
PHILTHEGAP TOOLS
PHILTHEGAP RESOURCES
Environnemental impact assessment
of actions/objects
FIELDS OF SOCIETY
Scenario acceptance
Operable
levers
Gap1-2
Gap3
σ1...n λ1...n
σ1...n λ1...n
σ1...n λ1...n
σ1...n λ1...n
σ1...n λ1...n σ1...n λ1...n
σ1σ2
σ3
σ6
σ5σ4
λ1λ2
λ3
λ6
λ5λ4
PRACTICE OF PHILOSOPHY (PP) WORKSHOPS
PP is recognized by UNESCO to serve the intellec-
tual and moral solidarity of humanity by providing
the conceptual principles and values on which
World peace depends. PhilTheGap will create a
conducive context to address the complexity of the
reflections surrounding climate change and energy
transition, while providing a framework within and
through which nuanced and informed decision-making will be possible by
implementing Enhance Philosophy for Children (EP4C) methodology,
elements of islands of rationality and non-violent communication (NVC)
into PP workshops cylces.
Mainstream energy policies define energy
security as the uninterrupted availability of energy sources at an afford-
able price. Concepts of rational use of energy are preferentially marginal-
ized, and renewable energy often assimilated to sustainability without jus-
tification. Our world is in fire, the litany of cataclysms already engaged is
well known; alas, we don’t act. Why? PhilTheGap gathers competences
in environmental and social sciences, philosophy, psychology, pedagogy,
finances, economics and political economy as well as in town planning. It
will develop and experiment innovative pedagogical tools for energy-
climate knowledge dissemination to laypersons as well as for iteration
with specialized audiences. Contextualized outreach resources, designed
to face people with a reality that is here and will last, will be mobilized in
workshops implementing practices of philosophy and psychology and
supported by digital applications allowing for discussion structuration,
monitoring and dissemination. The project aims at (1) clarifying those
gaps between parallel discourses for (2) empowering people for informed
decision-making. Shouldn’t the lion share of the transition be found in
energy reduction? PhilTheGap provides a platform for creating a shared
language to collaboratively imagine and set the foundation of a resilient
society capable of scaling back its energy consumption and managing it
in a genuinely sustainable manner.
ABSTRACT
Lorem ipsum
PhilTheGap modulator will generate chains of explanations for selected
sectors of the Swiss economy, simulating environmental impacts of
various levers (i.e. individual actions and consumer choices, political de-
cisions, new policies...), provinding key inputs to the serious game.
PHILTHEGAP SOCIAL AND EDUCATIONAL TOOLS
LAYPERSONS (Ages 13-99) DECISION AND POLICY MAKERS (Specialists, Businesses, Communities)
PME
• Multinational Corporations
• UrbaPlan & CSGE transition kit
for communities and townships
• Natural, social, technical sciences
• Economy, MBAs, Finance, Politics
• Schools
• Youth parliaments
TARGET AUDIENCES
The planet Earth, our place to live, is a finite system that has entered a new epoch, the Anthropo-
cene, as revealed by the great acceleration of socioeconomic changes and earth systems trends
since the late 1950’s (Steffen et al. 2015a).
Energy is the master determinant of most that happens on Earth (Hall 2018). As such, it seems to
push our civilization in a non-virtuous cycle linking economic growth to ever-increasing energy
consumption with associated resources uptake and environmental damages, resulting in earth
systems degradation as we are reaching (or even exceeding) planetary boundaries (Steffen et al.
2015b) (Fig. 1).
The concept of a transition, consisting of replacing the current fossil fuel-based system by a re-
newable one on one hand, and on the other hand, that climate technologies and geoengineering
would sequestrate GHG from the atmosphere, simply ignores the Earth planetary boundaries as
shown by Lade et al. (2020). Moreover, it hardly seems achievable (Fig. 2)!
ECONOMY
ENERGY
FINITE EARTH
GROWTH UPTAKE
DEGRADE
THE
IMPOSSIBLE
TRINITY
1965
1980
2000
2017
0
10
20
30
40
Global GHG Emissions [Gt CO2]
0
4
8
12
Global Energy Consumption [Gtoe]
Global Oil, Coal and Gas
GLOBAL CO2 EMISSIONS
Nuclear, Hydro and Renewable
What should be done...
Covid 19
Carbon neutrality by 2050
to keep global warming < 2°C
2035
2050
The energy transition
Electrifying the world
Fig. 1 Fig. 2
MISMATCH BETWEEN HOPE AND REALITY AT THE ENERGY-CLIMATE NEXUS
ENERGY: A GLOBAL AND GROWING PROBLEM
PHILTHEGAP: FEEL THE GAP TO FILL THE GAP
Sophie Barathieui, Martin Clercii, Samuel Heinzeniii, Sophie Perdrixiv, Patrick Scherrerv,i, Sophie Varonevi, Jonathan Vouillamozii et Naomi Vouillamozv
Mail to: naomi.vouillamoz@seismo-earth.com
Prof. Mathieu Gagnon, Université de Sherbrooke, Canada; Dr. Nicolas Szilas, TECFA (Technologies de Formation et Apprentissage) Université de Genève; Marcos Weil, UrbaPlan SA, Genève.
SEISMO EARTH
LE BON SENS
Energy Philosophy
Pedagogy
Ed-Tech
Social-
& Eco-
Psychology
PoliticsEconomy
Earth
Systemics
PHILTHEGAP
i Fondation ValAct, Genève v Seismo Earth AG, Biel/Bienne
ii CSGE Sàrl, Genève
iii Haute Ecole Pédagogique, Fribourg
iv Dr. Sophie Perdrix, Biel/Bienne
vi Metamorphe, Genève
COOPERATION PARTNERS
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