Article

Scented lotions may cause scaring and premature fading of tattoos

Authors:
  • Klein Buendel, Inc.
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Abstract

Although tattoo artists provide tattoo aftercare instructions to their clients, recommendations are often not cost-effective or supported by evidence. A 22-year-old man developed a pruritic red rash over his healing tattoo one week after receiving the tattoo. Although multiple queries were negative, the patient did note use of a scented lotion before the eruption. We determined that allergic contact dermatitis from the scented lotion caused scarring and premature fading of the new tattoo. Tattoo artists should recommend avoidance of scented lotions and instruct clients to care for their new tattoo like a wound in their aftercare instructions.

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Re: Cutaneous melanoma attributable to sunbed use: systematic review and meta-analysis
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Sandsmark EK, Salazar M, Jones J, et al. Re: Cutaneous melanoma attributable to sunbed use: systematic review and meta-analysis. 2012. https://www.bmj.com/content/345/bmj.e4757/rapidresponses. Accessed on June 20, 2019.