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Managing rapport in team conflicts: Dealing with “the elephant in the room”

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... Over time some team members formed friendships, spending time outside the teamwork context with each other, while other relationships remained more distant and less friendly. Especially towards the end, some of the relations became more problematic and considerable interactional work was undertaken to avoid open conflict (for details, see Debray, 2020). ...
... At the same time, admitting to a trouble may undermine a speaker's own position. Since not all relationships in the team were positive and issues of power affected team relations (see Debray, 2020), team members may have anticipated that these could be exploited by others. Yet there is not a single incident in the transcribed dataset where this appears to be the case. ...
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Introduction 1 Relationships 1.1 The data of relationships 1.2 Context 1.3 Relationship thinking 1.4 Enacting relationships and relationship types 1.5 Relationship-grounded society 2 Sociality 2.1 Human social intelligence 2.2 Social motivations 2.3 Tools for assessment and management 2.4 Semiotic process 2.5 Norms and heuristics 2.6 Communication as tool use 2.7 Two primitive imperatives for communication 3 Enchrony 3.1 Enchrony and its scope 3.2 Causal frames for understanding meaning 3.3 Normative organization 4 Semiosis 4.1 Anatomy of the semiotic process 4.2 Flexibility in semiotic processes 4.3 Inference as a semiotic process 4.4 Cultural epidemiology as a semiotic process 4.5 Elements of the semiotic process and their possibilities 4.6 Payoffs of this framework 4.7 The Saussurean sign: a convenient untruth 4.8 A frame-content dynamic 4.9 Meaning as a public process 5 Status 5.1 Status predicts and explains behavior 5.2 Entitlements, commitments, enablements 5.3 Relationships as statuses 6 Moves 6.1 Moves are composite signs 6.2 Composite utterances are interpreted as wholes 6.3 Turn-taking: moves in linguistic clothing 6.4 The move as a privileged level of semiosis 7 Cognition 7.1 Behavior-reading 7.2 Cognition and language 7.3 Psychology as interpretative heuristic 7.4 Fear of cognition? 8 Action 8.1 Natural action versus social action 8.2 Courses of action 8.3 Speech acts and actions-en 8.4 Categories of action-en? 8.5 A composite notion of actions-en 8.6 Ontology of actions-en 8.7 A generative account of action-en 9 Agency 9.1 Flexibility and accountability 9.2 Agent unity heuristic 9.3 Joint agency 9.4 Distributed agency 10 Asymmetry 10.1 Propositions and the relativity of knowledge 10.2 Epistemic Authority 10.3 Distribution of agency in practice 10.4 Sources of Asymmetry 10.5 Our imperfect communication system 11 Culture 11.1 Cultural systems 11.2 The Kri house as a system context for social relations 11.3 Ritual in communication 11.4 Kri residence 11.5 Practical interpretation of the Kri residence: to follow a norm 11.6 Spatial distribution and diagrammatic iconicity 11.7 Sanction of norms: making the tacit explicit 11.8 Everyday ritual and social relations 12 Grammar 12.1 Language as a system 12.2 Syntagmatic relations: grammar for turns 12.3 Paradigmatic relations in linguistic grammars 12.4 Markedness: special effects of choice within a system 12.5 The Lao system of person reference 12.6 Default reference to persons in Lao 12.7 Pragmatically marked initial references 12.8 Grammar expresses social relations under the radar 13 Knowledge 13.1 Common ground 13.2 Sources of common ground 13.3 Fuel for Gricean amplicative inference 13.4 Grounding for inferring 13.5 Audience design 13.6 Affiliation and information 13.7 From information to social relations Conclusion References Index
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