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Döpper, S. (2020), Der Wadi Suq-zeitliche Siedlungsplatz von Tawi Said im Zentraloman: Bericht über den Survey 2018, Mitteilungen der Deutschen Orient-Gesellschaft 152, 5-27

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In November 2018, a survey was conducted at the site of Tawi Said, which is located at the edge of the Sharqiyah desert in the Sultanate of Oman and was discovered in 1976 by Beatrice de Cardi. An area of 150 × 125 m was field-walked. All surface finds were collected and their position recorded with a hand-held GPS device. Nearly 8,600 objects were documented, the majority of them pottery sherds. Other finds include sea shells, chipped stone tools, copper production waste, jewellery and three fragments of chlorite vessels. The most interesting objects from the survey are two stamp seals, one of them resembling Dilmun style seals. Most of the pottery can be dated to the Late Islamic period, but a significant amount in the centre of the survey area dates to the Middle Bronze Age (Wadi Suq period, c. 2000–1600 BC), confirming an early assessment of the site by Beatrice de Cardi as the only settlement site of the Wadi Suq period so far known in central Oman. The far-reaching connections of Tawi Said in the Middle Bronze Age are testified by the presence of Indus pottery sherds as well as by the seal in a Dilmun affiliated style, and for the Late Islamic period by the large quantities of sea shells. One reason behind the choice of the location near the desert might be connected to copper production as other important metal working sites like Saruq al-Hadid (United Arab Emirates) and ʿUqdat al-Bakrah are also located in the marginal desert environment of the Rub al-Khali. All of this demonstrates the high potential of the site for future research.
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... In one of five test trenches, de Cardi discovered an early to middle Islamic fireplace. In a survey conducted by the University of Frankfurt at the site in November 2018, none of the mud-brick structures were rediscovered, but large quantities of pottery sherds from the Wadi Suq ( Fig. 8a-g) and the late Islamic periods were, intermingled with some from the middle Islamic period (Döpper, 2020). Thus, it is possible that the structures discovered by de Cardi are of an Islamic date. ...
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Significant changes in the material culture, subsistence and mode of life are associated with the Middle (c. 2000–1600 BCE) and Late Bronze Ages (c. 1600–1300 BCE) in Eastern Arabia. Since first excavations in the 1970s, research has focused on the United Arab Emirates, where all major sites of this period known to date are situated. This birthed the idea of two different lines of development in the second millennium BC. While a more gradual change is assumed for the United Arab Emirates, Central Oman was regarded as having completely abandoned settled agricultural life, returning to a less complex social organisation. This article presents new evidence from Tawi Said, Al‐Mudhairib and the Wilayat al‐Mudhaybi that shows that the developments in both regions were more akin to each other than previously assumed. This encourages us to reconsider our assumptions about Central Oman’s social complexity during this pivotal period of Oman’s history.
Heatmaps der grob mineralisch gemagerten Waren 30 und 31 (rot), der glasieren Waren (schwarz), der leicht bis mittelstark mineralisch gemagerten Ware 11 (blau) und der bemalten 20er
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Abb. 8: Heatmaps der grob mineralisch gemagerten Waren 30 und 31 (rot), der glasieren Waren (schwarz), der leicht bis mittelstark mineralisch gemagerten Ware 11 (blau) und der bemalten 20er Waren (grün).
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