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This is the twelfth contribution to the Fungal Diversity Notes series on fungal taxonomy, based on materials collected from many countries which were examined and described using the methods of morphology, anatomy, and strain culture, combined with DNA sequence analyses. 110 taxa are described and illustrated, including five new genera, 92 new species, eight new combinations and other taxonomic contributions (one new sequenced species, one new host and three new records) which are accommodated in 40 families and 1 incertae sedis in Dothideomycetes. The new genera are Amyloceraceomyces, Catenuliconidia, Hansenopezia, Ionopezia and Magnopulchromyces. The new species are Amyloceraceomyces angustisporus, Amylocorticium ellipsosporum, Arthrinium sorghi, Catenuliconidia uniseptata, Clavulina sphaeropedunculata, Colletotrichum parthenocissicola, Coniothyrium triseptatum, Cortinarius indorusseus, C. paurigarhwalensis, C. sinensis, C. subsanguineus, C. xiaojinensis, Diaporthe pimpinellae, Dictyosporella guizhouensis, Diplodia torilicola, Fuscoporia marquesiana, F. semiarida, Hansenopezia decora, Helicoarctatus thailandicus, Hirsutella hongheensis, Humidicutis brunneovinacea, Lentaria gossypina, L. variabilis, Lycoperdon lahorense, L. pseudocurtisii, Magnopulchromyces scorpiophorus, Moelleriella gracilispora, Neodevriesia manglicola, Neodidymelliopsis salvia, N. urticae, Neoroussoella magnoliae, Neottiella gigaspora, Ophiosphaerella chiangraiensis, Phaeotremella yunnanensis, Podosphaera yulii, Rigidoporus juniperinus, Rhodofomitopsis pseudofeei, Russula benghalensis, Scleroramularia vermispora, Scytinopogon minisporus, Sporormurispora paulsenii, Thaxteriellopsis obliqus, Tomentella asiae-orientalis, T. atrobadia, T. atrocastanea, T. aureomarginata, T. brevis, T. brunneoflava, T. brunneogrisea, T. capitatocystidiata, T. changbaiensis, T. citrinocystidiata, T. coffeae, T. conclusa, T. cystidiata, T. dimidiata, T. duplexa, T. efibulata, T. efibulis, T. farinosa, T. flavidobadia, T. fuscocrustosa, T. fuscofarinosa, T. fuscogranulosa, T. fuscopelliculosa, T. globospora, T. gloeocystidiata, T. griseocastanea, T. griseofusca, T. griseomarginata, T. inconspicua, T. incrustata, T. interrupta, T. liaoningensis, T. longiaculeifera, T. longiechinuli, T. megaspora, T. olivacea, T. olivaceobrunnea, T. pallidobrunnea, T. pallidomarginata, T. parvispora, T. pertenuis, T. qingyuanensis, T. segregata, T. separata, T. stipitata, T. storea, Trichoderma ceratophylletum, Tyromyces minutulus, Umbelopsis heterosporus and Xylolentia reniformis. The new combinations are Antrodiella descendena, Chloridium macrocladum, Hansenopezia retrocurvata, Rhodofomitopsis monomitica, Rh. oleracea, Fuscoporia licnoides, F. scruposa and Ionopezia gerardii. A new sequenced species (Graphis supracola), one new host (Aplosporella prunicola) and three new geographical records (Golovinomyces monardae, Paradictyoarthrinium diffractum and Prosthemium betulinum), are reported.
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... Approximately 400 names of Tomentella are recorded in the databases Index Fungorum and MycoBank, and 1033 species hypothesis codes of this genus were recorded in UNITE database according to threshold value 1.5% (Nilsson et al., 2019). Approximately 200 species accepted in these databases were from the diversity and taxonomic studies based on basidiocarp specimens in countries worldwide, including 91 species from North America (Larsen, 1974); 41 species from British Isles of United Kingdom (Wakefield, 1969); 48 species from temperate Eurasia (Kõljalg, 1996;Lu et al., 2018a,b); 13 species from West Africa (Yorou et al., 2007(Yorou et al., , 2011(Yorou et al., , 2012aYorou, 2008;Yorou and Agerer, 2008); 8 species from the West India (Welden, 1968;Thind and Rattan, 1971); 12 species from Italy (Yorou and Agerer, 2011a,b); 3 species from South America (Kuhar et al., 2016); 1 species from South India (Natarajan and Chandrashekara, 1978); 11 species from Canada, Trinidad, Jamaica, Venezuela, Pakistan, and South Africa (Wakefield, 1966); and 46 and 3 species from Northeast and Northwest China, respectively (Yuan et al., 2020;Lu and Yuan, 2021). In addition, eight tomentelloid species from Australia and New Zealand have also been reported (Cunningham, 1963;Agerer and Bougher, 2001). ...
... The ML and Bayesian analyses produced a similar topology, and the ML tree is shown in Figure 1. In the phylogenetic tree, the ingroup species were divided into 24 main clades, of which 17 clades (clade 1, clade 3, clade 4, clade 5, clade 7, clade 8, clade 10, clade 11, clade 13, clade 14, clade 15, clade 18, clade 19, clade 20, clade 21, clade 22, and clade 23) are consistent with the previous ITS phylogenetic analyses (Yuan et al., 2020). Nine of the 17 clades are more strongly supported (100% ML/1.00 BPP for clade 7, 86% ML/0.99 BPP for clade 13, 93% ML/1.00 BPP for clade 14, 60% ML/0.99 BPP for clade 18, 84% ML/1.00 BPP for clade 19 and 0.95 BPP for clade 20, 75% ML/1.00 BPP for clade 21, 73% ML/1.00 BPP for clade 22, and 61% ML/0.97 BPP for clade 23, respectively), and the others lacked significant support. ...
... However, T. verruculata is differentiated from T. bidoupensis by arachnoid basidiocarps and comparatively narrower hyphae of rhizomorphs (3-4 µm in diameter). The clade 19 of the tree (Figure 1) also contains T. olivaceobrunnea and T. griseocastanea, and the clamped hyphae and the absence of rhizomorphs of them can be obviously distinguished from the T. bidoupensis (Yuan et al., 2020). ...
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