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Collaboration in South Africa's Forestry-Products Biorefinery Innovation System Examining the Knowledge Network of Leverage Professionals

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The aim of this study is to deploy and develop technological systems of innovation (TIS) (the dominant approach to explaining the functions of an eco-innovation system) to account for the current status of the forestry-products biorefinery innovation system in South Africa, and the role that the knowledge network and individuals within it play in expediating the uptake of biorefinery technologies in South Africa. TIS tends to not explicitly consider the role of the individual, as it predominantly refers to the actor or organisational level, a shortcoming this thesis addresses. To this end, the thesis interrogates three sets of research questions: (a) how collaborative is South Africa’s forestry-products biorefinery innovation system? (b) what are the dynamics of the knowledge network associated with South Africa’s forestry-products biorefinery innovation system? and (c) who are the key leverage professionals in the forestry-products biorefinery innovation system?
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