Conference Paper

How Co-Constructed Work Obligations Lead to ICT-Related Technostress

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Abstract

Technostress is a growing area of research and a concern for practitioners. So far, IS research on technostress has focused on either neurophysiological or psychological measurements. We argue for a sociological approach that allows us to reveal the socially co-created obligations around using ICTs (information and communication technologies). We ask, "What can the sociological analytical concept of obligation reveal about ICT related technostress in organizations?" To investigate this question, we use the sociological concept of obligation. We conduct interpretative research based on qualitative interviews. We find that employees see technostress as their individual obligation and devise strategies to avoid it. These strategies add to their technostress and augment group obligations that can lead to technostress for the collective. We contribute to theory by employing a new-to-IS theory and a qualitative approach to investigate technostress. We also contribute to practice by revealing specific obligations that contribute to technostress.

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... In addition, this study focused on technostress stemming from the psychological perspective. According to sociological [68] and neurophysiological perspectives [57] to technostress, however, there might be elements of technostress that cannot be controlled solely by adjusting ones beliefs. ...
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