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First insights into the survey: The contribution of European Citizen Science projects to the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)

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First insights into the survey: The contribution of European Citizen Science projects to the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)

Abstract

The contribution of citizen science to the achievement of the SDGs has become a hot topic in current research. In recent published papers, three key aspects have been examined in more detail. First, the current and potential contributions of citizen science to the SDGs on the level of the goals and/or indicators (Fraisl et al., 2020; Schleicher & Schmidt, 2020), second, data acquisition and sharing and complementing of traditional sources with data from citizen science projects (Fritz et al., 2019; Fraisl et al., 2020) and third, the fields of action in which citizen science projects can provide significant impetus for achieving the SDGs (Sauermann et al., 2020; West & Pateman, 2017). The articles provide very valuable analyses, but could not build on empirical data and information from the project participants themselves. This should be supplemented by our online-questionnaire. The survey was open from 7/29 to 10/4/2020. In total, 125 entries from all over Europe could be analysed. Goal 3 (Good health and well-being), Goal 4 (Quality education), Goal 15 (Life on Land) and Goal 11 (Sustainable cities and communities) were the ones where projects actively contributed the most. In addition, there is evidence of good to very good potential to support all goals in future. 72% of the projects are involved in monitoring (collecting, processing and making data available) and already 30% share data and information with authorities (municipality, federal or state), but 19% do not pass on data and 34% ‘do not know’. Only one project shares data with one of the UN databases. Consequently, 55% ask for assistance on how to contribute to data collection, monitoring and analysis that is useful to the achievement of the SDGs and 50% on how to report data to responsible authorities and/or United Nations databases. Whereas the current and future contributions to the goals were partially surprising and deviate from previous analyses, we found strong evidence that projects should receive more support to adapt or extend their data collection and data management (according to Fraisl et al., 2020). Based on these results, we aim to develop a new approach to facilitate the development of new partnerships. We will focus on the UN databases that have the greatest potential in terms of benefiting from citizen science data. References Fraisl, D., Campbell, J., See, L. et al. (2020). Mapping Citizen Science contributions to the UN sustainable development goals. Sustainability Science. Available at https://doi.org/10.1007/s11625-020-00833-7 [last accessed 17 August 2020]. Fritz, S., See, L., Carlson, T. et al. (2019). Citizen Science and the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals. Nature Sustainability, 2, 922–930 (2019). Available at https://www.nature.com/articles/s41893-019-0390-3 [last accessed 17 August 2020]. Sauermann, H, Vohland, K., Antoniou, V. et al. (2020). Citizen Science and sustainability transitions. Research Policy, 49, 103978. Available at https://doi.org/10.1016/j.respol.2020.103978 [last accessed 17 August 2020]. Schleicher, K. & Schmidt, C. (2020). Citizen Science in Germany as Research and Sustainability Education: Analysis of the main forms and foci and its relation to the Sustainable Development Goals. Sustainability 2020, 12(15), 6044. Available at https://doi.org/10.3390/su12156044 [last accessed 17 August 2020]. West, S. & Pateman, R. (2017). How could Citizen Science support the Sustainable Development Goals? Policy brief. Stockholm Environment Institute. Available at https://www.sei.org/publications/citizen-science-sustainable-development-goals/ [last accessed 17 August 2020].
First insights into the survey:
The contribution of European Citizen Science projects to
the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)
Nicola Moczek,
Silke Voigt-Heucke, Kim Mortega, Claudia Fabó Cartas, Jörn Knobloch
Museum für Naturkunde Berlin
Recent publications identify three key aspects
of citizen science’s contribution to SDGs
1) Goals and/or indicators: the current and potential contributions of
citizen science to the SDGs (Fraisl, Campbell, See et al., 2020; Schleicher & Schmidt, 2020)
2) Fields of action: providing significant impetus for achieving the SDGs
(Sauermann, Vohland, Antoniou et al., 2020; West & Pateman, 2017)
3) Data: acquisition, sharing and complementing of traditional data sources
(Fritz, See, Carlson et al., 2019; Fraisl et al., 2020)
The articles provide very valuable analyses, but could not build on
empirical data and information from the project participants themselves.
Nicola Moczek et al., Museum für Naturkunde Berlin, Leibniz-Institut für Evolutions-und Biodiversitätsforschung
First insights into the survey: The contribution of European Citizen Science projects to the UN sustainable development goals (SDGs)
Survey 2020: 125 projects from all over Europe and beyond
Nicola Moczek et al., Museum für Naturkunde Berlin, Leibniz-Institut für Evolutions-und Biodiversitätsforschung
Survey open from 29 Jul 12 Oct, 20;
N = 125, 66% in their “active” phase;
78% initiated by university, college or
research institute;
1.) The current and future contribution is linked to all (!) SDGs
1,6
1,6
4,8
4,8
7,2
6,4
6,4
4,8
11,2
7,2
10,4
13,6
21,6
16,0
17,6
24,0
25,6
8,0
8,0
8,0
10,4
9,6
12,0
12,8
17,6
11,2
16,0
16,8
21,6
16,8
22,4
23,2
20,0
23,2
010 20 30 40 50
07. Af fordable and clean energy
01. No poverty
08. Decent work and economic growth
02. Zero hunger
14. Life below water
09. Industry, innovation and infr astructure
10. Reduced inequalitie s
16. Peace, justice and strong institutions
17. Partnerships for the goals
06. Clean water and sanitati on
12. Responsible consumption and production
05. Ge nder equal ity
15. Life on land
13. Climate ation
11. Sustainable cities and communities
04. Qual ity educ ation
03. Good health and well-being
project acitvely contributes (procent) project has potential to contribute (procent)
N = 125, percent;
multiple selection possible;
sorted in descending order
2.) The majority of projects are active in the fields
monitoring and raising awareness
Nicola Moczek, Museum für Naturkunde Berlin, Leibniz-Institut für Evolutions-und Biodiversitätsforschung
First insights into the survey: The contribution of European Citizen Science projects to the UN sustainable development goals (SDGs)
N = 125, percent, multiple selection possible;
Items taken from West & Pateman (2017);
supplemented
17,6
25,6
43,2
66,4
72,0
0,0 20,0 40,0 60,0 80,0 100,0
Defining
Implementing
Acting
Raising awareness
Monitoring
collecting, processing, making data available
recognising problems, informing, publishing
enable sustainable behaviour,
promote engagement
implement concrete measures, create
offers, solve problems
set goals or new indicators
3.) Only one project shares its data with an UN database,
there is great uncertainty how to share data
Nicola Moczek et al., Museum für Naturkunde Berlin, Leibniz-Institut für Evolutions-und Biodiversitätsforschung
First insights into the survey: The contribution of European Citizen Science projects to the UN sustainable development goals (SDGs)
N = 125, percent,
multiple selection possible;
19 UN databases were
presented;
1 was selected: UNEP (UN
Environment Program)
34,1
29,5
19,3
010 20 30 40 50
I don't know
We share our information with
authorities (municipalit y, federal or
state).
We do not pass on any data.
The projects ask for assistance in order to support the SDGs
mainly in the field of data
Nicola Moczek et al., Museum für Naturkunde Berlin, Leibniz-Institut für Evolutions-und Biodiversitätsforschung
First insights into the survey: The contribution of European Citizen Science projects to the UN sustainable development goals (SDGs)
N = 125, percent,
multiple selection possible
27,3
31,3
35,4
37,4
49,5
54,5
010 20 30 40 50 60 70
raise awareness of the S DGs
help to define SDG-goals and -indicators
take action and implement sustainable
measures
enable engagement and promote
sustainable behaviour
rep ort d ata to responsible au thorities and/
or United Nations databases
contribute to data collection, monitoring
and analys is that is useful fo r the SDGs
References
Nicola Moczek, Museum für Naturkunde Berlin, Leibniz-Institut für Evolutions-und Biodiversitätsforschung
First insights into the survey: The contribution of European Citizen Science projects to the UN sustainable development goals (SDGs)
Fraisl, D., Campbell, J., See, L. et al. (2020). Mapping Citizen Science contributions to the UN sustainable
development goals. Sustainability Science. Available at https://doi.org/10.1007/s11625-020-00833-7 [last
accessed 17 August 2020].
Fritz, S., See, L., Carlson, T. et al. (2019). Citizen Science and the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals.
Nature Sustainability, 2, 922930 (2019). Available at https://www.nature.com/articles/s41893-019-0390-3
[last accessed 17 August 2020].
Sauermann, H., Vohland, K., Antoniou, V. et al. (2020). Citizen Science and sustainability transitions. Research
Policy, 49, 103978. Available at https://doi.org/10.1016/j.respol.2020.103978 [last accessed 17 August 2020].
Schleicher, K. & Schmidt, C. (2020). Citizen Science in Germany as Research and Sustainability Education:
Analysis of the main forms and foci and its relation to the Sustainable Development Goals. Sustainability
2020, 12(15), 6044. Available at https://doi.org/10.3390/su12156044 [last accessed 17 August 2020].
Shirk
West, S. & Pateman, R. (2017). How could Citizen Science support the Sustainable Development Goals? Policy
brief. Stockholm Environment Institute. Available at https://www.sei.org/publications/citizen-science-
sustainable-development-goals/ [last accessed 17 August 2020].
Supplement
Nicola Moczek, Museum für Naturkunde Berlin, Leibniz-Institut für Evolutions-und Biodiversitätsforschung
First insights into the survey: The contribution of European Citizen Science projects to the UN sustainable development goals (SDGs)
71% of the projects work together with citizens as collaborators
Nicola Moczek, Museum für Naturkunde Berlin, Leibniz-Institut für Evolutions-und Biodiversitätsforschung
First insights into the survey: The contribution of European Citizen Science projects to the UN sustainable development goals (SDGs)
N = 125, percent, multiple selection possible
12,4
13,3
32,7
35,4
57,5
70,8
0,0 10,0 20,0 30,0 40,0 50,0 60,0 70,0 80,0 90,0 100,0
Co-Creators
Contributors (primarily of data)
Supporters
Initiators
Project leaders
Collaborators
The majority of the projects are in their active phase
Nicola Moczek, Museum für Naturkunde Berlin, Leibniz-Institut für Evolutions-und Biodiversitätsforschung
First insights into the survey: The contribution of European Citizen Science projects to the UN sustainable development goals (SDGs)
2,4
3,2
4,8
6,4
17,6
65,6
0,0 20,0 40,0 60,0 80,0 100,0
On hold
Completed
Not answered
Periodically active
Not yet started
Active
In what phase is your citizen science project currently?
N = 125, percent
Items taken from
https://eu-
citizen.science/projects
The majority of the projects were initiated by
universities and research institutes
Nicola Moczek, Museum für Naturkunde Berlin, Leibniz-Institut für Evolutions-und Biodiversitätsforschung
First insights into the survey: The contribution of European Citizen Science projects to the UN sustainable development goals (SDGs)
N = 125, percent, multiple selection possible
Nicola Moczek, Museum für Naturkunde Berlin, Leibniz-Institut für Evolutions-und Biodiversitätsforschung
First insights into the survey: The contribution of European Citizen Science projects to the UN sustainable development goals (SDGs)
0,0
1,6
2,4
2,4
2,4
3,2
3,2
3,2
4,0
4,8
4,8
4,8
5,6
5,6
5,6
6,4
7,2
8,8
9,6
10,4
10,4
11,2
11,2
16,0
17,6
18,4
18,4
25,6
41,6
010 20 30 40 50 60
Genetics
Tr an spor tati on
Chemical sciences
Sound
Ind egen ious culture
Archae ology and Cultu ral
Astro nomy and Space
Biogeography
Geology and Earth science
Animals
Long-term species monitoring
Food science
Birds
Inse cts a nd po llinator s
Science policy
Physics
Agriculture & Veterinay science
Natural resource management
Geography
Nature and outdoors
Ocean, Water, Marine and Terrestial
Inf ormation an d Compu ter sciences
Biology
Climate and Weather
Edu c atio n
Health and Medicine
Social s ciences
Biodiversity
Eco logy and En viro nmen t
To which topic can your project best be assigned?
N = 125, percent, multiple selection possible;
topics from https://eu-citizen.science/projects
All in all the, the current effects of citizen science in the
respective countries are assessed with caution
Nicola Moczek, Museum für Naturkunde Berlin, Leibniz-Institut für Evolutions-und Biodiversitätsforschung
First insights into the survey: The contribution of European Citizen Science projects to the UN sustainable development goals (SDGs)
2,9
3,4
3,7
3,7
3,8
4,2
5,1
5,1
5,1
5,3
012345678910 11
identifying new scientific questions through co-operation…
the impulses of citizen science projects in my country for
the a cceptance by the scient ific establishment of the
the knowledge transfer from citizens to science
the contribution of citiz en science t o the s cientific literacy…
the cooperation and networking of citizens with resea rch…
the d evelopment of new methods to involve cit izens in…
the a cceptance of science on the part of the citizens
the knowledge transfer from science t o citiz ens
the variety of citi zen science activities available to the public
N = 125, means,
rating: 1= 0%, 11 = 100%
Discussion
Nicola Moczek, Museum für Naturkunde Berlin, Leibniz-Institut für Evolutions-und Biodiversitätsforschung
First insights into the survey: The contribution of European Citizen Science projects to the UN sustainable development goals (SDGs)
Projects should receive more support to adapt or extend their data collection
and data management (according to Fraisl et al., 2020).
They could also be supported by a number of concrete guidelines and
workshops how to address and how to help to achieve the SDGs in different
fields of action.
Based on this results, we aim to develop a new approach to facilitate the
development of new partnerships. We will focus on the UN databases that
have the greatest potential in terms of benefiting.
ResearchGate has not been able to resolve any citations for this publication.
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How could Citizen Science support the Sustainable Development Goals? Policy brief. Stockholm Environment Institute
  • Shirk West
  • S Pateman
Shirk West, S. & Pateman, R. (2017). How could Citizen Science support the Sustainable Development Goals? Policy brief. Stockholm Environment Institute. Available at https://www.sei.org/publications/citizen-sciencesustainable-development-goals/ [last accessed 17 August 2020].