Chapter

Women and Status of Lifelong Learning in Nigeria

Authors:
  • The Kola Scholars
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Abstract

In Nigeria, lifelong learning is been promoted through adult learning for women, more education centers such as vocational learning centers were established to cater for female learners (Olaniyi FO, Acad J Interdiscip Stud 3:493, 2014). In other words, vocational centers were created to encourage girl-child and women to take on vocational skills programs in order to bridge the gap. Though the present status of lifelong learning in Nigeria espouses literacy rates among women in terms of access to continuous education through the establishment of the ministry of women affairs to give more attention and support for women who have been deprived in the past (Para-Mallam F, Compare J Comp Int Educ 40:459–477, 2010). The government implemented a policy of literacy programs for both men and women to motivate and sensitize them across all the states which thus helps to reduce the level of illiteracy in the country (Odukoya D, Formulation and implementation of educational policies in Nigeria. Educational Research Network for West and Central Africa (ERNCAWA). Retrieved from http://www.slideshare.net, 2009). This chapter reviews the history of education and status of lifelong learning in Nigeria. It provides empirical findings related to career plan and workplace scenarios for women working in telecommunication technology in Nigeria.

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