ArticlePDF Available

Abstract and Figures

BUFO STEJNEGERI (Korean Water Toad). REPUBLIC OF KOREA: SOUTH GYEONGSANG: Sancheong (35.30482°N, 127.75080°E; WGS 84), 547 m elev. 12 May 2019. Kevin R. Messenger. Verified by Yikweon Jang. HerpMapper (HM 278953; photo voucher) and Zoological Reference Collection, Lee Kong Chian Natural History Museum, National University of Singapore (ZRC(IMG) 1.222; photo voucher). New “county” (Korean “-ri”) record, extending the range 12 km south (Shim et al. 2006. Nat. Conserv. 134:10–25) to a different water basin. Species relatively abundant further north, in northern areas of Jiri Mountain National Park (Song et al. 2009. Korean J. Env. Eco. 23:187–193; database of National Institute of Biological Resources). A two-day stream survey conducted by six people at this locality resulted in one adult individual and two tadpoles further downstream. Supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea (2017R1A2B200357).
Content may be subject to copyright.
532 GEOGRAPHIC DISTRIBUTION
gap in Panama between a place ca. 146 km to the east at Los Lim-
ones, Baru District, Chiriqui Province (iNaturalist 44983837; www.
inaturalist.org/observations/44983837) and ca. 66 km to the west
at Las Blanditas, Santiago District, Veraguas province (iNaturalist
35786524; www.inaturalist.org/observations/35786524). Pixvae
is a Pacific coastal community located 11 km from Coiba Island
National Park. Fieldwork was supported with funds from a Coiba
Scientific Station (COIBA AIP) grant and under the scientific per-
mit SE/A-53-19 issued by the Ministry of Environment of Panama.
ERIC ENRIQUE FLORES
(e-mail: sailax1@gmail.com), Coiba Scientific
Station (COIBA AIP), City of Knowledge, Clayton, Panama, Republic of Pan-
ama and INDICASAT AIP, Bldg. 219, City of Knowledge, Clayton, Panama, Re-
public of Panama;
EDGARDO DIAZ FERGUSON
(e-mail: ediaz@coiba.org.
pa), Coiba Scientific Station (COIBA AIP), City of Knowledge, Clayton, Pana-
ma, Republic of Panama;
JOELBIN DE LA CRUZ
, Llano Grande, Ocu District,
Herrera, Republic of Panama (e-mail: joelbin-18@hotmail.com).
BUFO NEBULIFER (= INCILIUS NEBULIFER) (Gulf Coast Toad).
USA:
TEX
AS:
h
a
MI
L
t
on
c
o
.:
ca.
945
m
downstream
of
G
entr
y
S
tr
eet
crossing of Pecan Creek, Hamilton (31.71120°N, 98.11179°W; WGS
84), 342 m elev. 9 January 2020. Lawrence G. Bassett. Verified by
Toby J. Hibbitts. Biodiversity Research and Teaching Collections,
Texas A&M University (TCWC 104884). New county record (Dixon
2013. Amphibians and Reptiles of Texas: with Keys, Taxonomic
Synopses, Bibliography, and Distribution Maps. Texas A&M Uni-
versity Press, College Station, Texas. 447 pp.). One specimen (39.35
mm SVL, 4.9 g) was found ca. 10 m from the margin of Pecan Creek
at 1725 h. This record fills a gap in the distribution of
Bufo nebu-
lifer
among Lampasas, Coryell, Bosque, Erath, Comanche, and
Mills counties (Dixon 2013,
op. cit.
). The nearest known record is
ca. 70 km to the southeast in Coryell County (Louisiana Museum
of Natural History, Louisiana State University [LSUMZ] 6160).
LAWRENCE G. BASSETT (e-mail: lawrencebassett@gmail.com) and MI-
CHAEL R. J. FORSTNER. Department of Biology, Texas State University, 601
University Drive, San Marcos, Texas 78666, USA.
BUFO STEJNEGERI (Korean Water Toad). REPUBLIC OF KOREA:
SOUTH GYEONGSANG: Sancheong (35.30482°N, 127.75080°E;
WGS 84), 547 m elev. 12 May 2019. Kevin R. Messenger. Verified
by Yikweon Jang. HerpMapper (HM 278953; photo voucher) and
Zoological Reference Collection, Lee Kong Chian Natural History
Museum, National University of Singapore (ZRC[IMG] 1.222; pho-
to voucher). New “county” (Korean -ri”) record, extending the
range 12 km south (Shim et al. 2006. Nat. Conserv. 134:1025) to
a different water basin. Species relatively abundant further north,
in northern areas of Jiri Mountain National Park (Song et al. 2009.
Korean J. Env. Eco. 23:187193; database of National Institute of
Biological Resources). A two-day stream survey conducted by six
people at this locality resulted in one adult individual and two tad-
poles further downstream. Supported by the National Research
Foundation of Korea (2017R1A2B200357).
KEVIN MESSENGER, College of Biology and the Environment, Nan-
jing Forestry University, Nanjing, 210037, People’s Republic of China; HOL-
LIS DAHN, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University
of Toronto, Toronto, M5S 1A1, Canada; DESIREE ANDERSEN, YUCHEOL SHIN,
YOONJUNG YI, YOONHYUK BAE, AMAËL BORZÉE, Division of
EcoScience, Ewha Womans University, Seoul 03760, Republic of Korea (e-
mail: amaelborzee@gmail.com).
DRYOPHYTES SUWEONENSIS
(Suweon Treefrog)
. REPUBLIC
OF KOREA: GYEONGGI: Yeoncheon (38.05806°N, 127.06889°W;
WGS 84), 78 m elev. 14 June 2020. Yoonhyuk Bae. Verified by
Yikweon Jang. InfoBoss Cyber Herbarium Collections, InfoBoss
Inc. (INP_00001; photo voucher) and Zoological Reference Col-
lection, Lee Kong Chian Natural History Museum, National Uni-
versity of Singapore (ZRC[IMG] 1.224; photo voucher). A total of
20 calling males recorded on narrow strip of land between four-
lane road and train tracks. New locality extends the known range
of this species by 32 km from Imjingak (37.90139°N, 126.763054°S;
Borzée et al. 2017. PeerJ 5:e3872). Northernmost locality in Repub-
lic of Korea, but south of population in Democratic People’s Re-
public of Korea (Borzée et al. 2020. PLoS ONE 15:e0234299).
EUNKI SON, Department of Landscape Architecture, University of Seoul,
Seoul 02504, Republic of Korea; YOONHYUK BAE, InfoBoss Research Center,
Seoul 07766, Republic of Korea; JONGSUN PARK, InfoBoss Research Center,
Seoul 07766, Republic of Korea; AMAËL BORZÉE, College of Biology and the
Environment, Nanjing Forestry University, Nanjing 210037, People’s Republic
of China (e-mail: amaelborzee@gmail.com).
ELEUTHERODACTYLUS PALLIDUS (Pale Chirping Frog). MEX-
ICO:
SINAL
O
A:
M
u
n
I
c
IP
a
L
I
t
y
o
F
c
onco
r
d
I
a
:
4.8
km
E
of
C
opalá
on
Hwy. 40 (MazatlánDurango Highway) (23.40040°N, 105.91569°W;
WSG 84), 541 m elev. 16 August 2015. J. A. Loc-Barragán, H. Franz-
Chávez, A. J. Grünwald, and C. I. Grünwald. Verified by Jacobo
Reyes-Velazco. Herpetological Collection, Museum of Zoology,
Faculty of Sciences, UNAM (MZFC-HE 33188). First record for this
species from Sinaloa, northernmost known locality in Mexico, and
a range extension of ca. 105 km northwest from the closest docu-
mented site 2.7 mi (4.3 km) southwest of Huajicori, Nayarit (Loc-
Barragán et al. 2019. Bull. Chicago Herpetol. Soc. 54:205213). The
frog was found at night by triangulation while vocalizing on the
side of the road from vegetation in tropical deciduous forest. It is
noted that records of
E
.
modestus
and
E
.
teretistes
from Sinaloa are
representatives of
E. pallidus
;
E. modestus
is restricted to Nayarit
and Colima and
E. teretistes
is restricted to Jalisco (Grünwald et al.
2018. Mesoamer. Herpetol. 5:783). The frog was caught under a
permit (#FAUT-0093) to Adrian Nieto-Montes de Oca with exten-
sion to CIG.
JESÚ S A. LOC-BARRAGÁN, Red Mesoamericana y del Caribe para la
Conservación de Anfibios y Reptiles (MesoHerp) and Biodiversa, Comité Na-
cional para la Conservación de Ecosistemas Mexicanos A.C. Avenida de la
Ribera no. 203, C. P. 45900, Chapala, Jalisco, México (e-mail: biolocbarragan@
gmail.com); HÉCTOR FRANZ-CHÁ VEZ (e-mail: hector.franz@hotmail.com),
ANDRÉ J. GRÜ NWALD, and CHRISTOPH I. GRÜ NWALD, Biodiversa, Co-
mité Nacional para la Conservación de Ecosistemas Mexicanos A.C., Avenida
de la Ribera 203, Chapala, Jalisco, México, C. P. 45905 (e-mail: cgruenwald@
switaki.com).
ELEUTHERODACTYLUS ZEUS (Cuban Giant Frog). CUBA: AR-
TEMISA:
M
u
n
I
c
IP
a
L
I
t
y
o
F
b
a
h
í
a
h
ond
a
:
C
uev
a
de
C
anillas
,
P
an
de
Guajaibón (22.78488°N, 83.39052°W; WGS 84), 50 m elev. 29 Oc-
tober 2019. Adonis González Carralero. Verified by Manuel Itur-
riaga Monsisbay. Instituto de Ecología y Sistemática, Havana,
Cuba (CZACC 14.16575). First record for the Municipality of Ba-
hia Honda and to the protected area of Pan de Guajaibón, ca.
12.7 airline km from the nearest record at Baños de Los Berme-
jales, Municipality of Los Palacios, Pinar del Río Province (cited
just as “Los Bermejales;” Buide 1967. Torreia 1:160). The adult frog
(57.8 mm SVL) was discovered inside the cave at 1046 h during
an expedition to Guaniguanico Massif, using permit No. 06/19 for
project P211LH005-008 “Diversidad Biológica en los Ecosistemas
Montañosos Guamuhaya y Guaniguanico Bajo un Enfoque Paisa-
jístico,” issued to Y.pez-Hurtado by the Instituto de Ecología y
Sistemática, Cuba.
Herpetological Review 51(3), 2020
Article
Full-text available
Latitudinal variations in species niche due to factors such as phenotypic plasticity and local adaptation pose fundamental problems for ecological niche modelling at large geographic scales. Species adaptation to varying climates across latitudes thus necessitates the latitudinal adjustment of climatic variables for incorporation into more accurate models of habitat suitability and species distribution. Previous studies have identified changes in species’ elevational distributions across latitudes, however few studies incorporate latitude-adjusted variables into suitability or distribution models. In this study, we utilized generalized additive models (GAMs) to adjust bioclimatic variables by latitude in order to remove latitudinal variation in ecological niche models. We incorporated these latitude-adjusted variables into maximum entropy (MaxEnt) models of two species of toad, Bufo sachalinensis (previously Bufo gargarizans) and Bufo stejnegeri, in northeast Asia. We additionally identified thresholds in bioclimatic and terrain variables that delineate boundaries between the two Bufo species where their ranges overlap. We found that GAM adjustment of bioclimatic variables effectively removed latitudinal variation in said variables. MaxEnt models incorporating these latitude-adjusted variables had significantly improved model fit (AUC and TSS) for both Bufo species. We identified a potential sympatric area shared by the two species and delineated a geographic boundary thresholding the probable presence of one species over the other. This study shows a clear improvement for distribution models with the inclusion of latitude-adjusted bioclimatic variables for both narrow and wide-ranging species. This has implications for future distribution modelling practices, especially for geographically widespread species, and has potential for modelling species distributions in climate change scenarios. Further, the methodology for delimiting species thresholds has future use in modelling contact zones of related species.
ResearchGate has not been able to resolve any references for this publication.