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Unexplored therapeutic treasure of Himalayan sea buckthorn berry: An opportunity for rejuvenation applications in Ayurveda

Authors:
  • Faculty of Ayurveda ,IMS .Banaras Hindu University

Abstract

Ayurveda captured almost all herbs in its indications for therapeutics from the period of Vadas. More than 700 plants are discussed elaborately in various classics of Ayurveda of different periods. However, it seems that here is a missing link about sea buckthorn alias Amleech (Hippophae rhamnoides family Elaeagnaceae). This review article is all about morphological characteristic, properties, active constituents, therapeutic spectrum, cosmetic value, nutraceutical value of the plant and its uses for the well-being of humanity. Our objectives are to make this plant beneficial to all humanity as per doctrines of Ayurveda pharmaceutics and therapeutics. We had have searched the available research papers, textbooks, and reference books and summarizes the results related to various properties of sea buckthorn and also emphasizes the aspects that warrant future research in India establishing its activity and utility in preventing diseases related to skin, liver, gastrointestinal, and even cancer. Contemporary researches are indicatives of its various therapeutic properties due to its constituent chemistry such as flavonoids, carotenoides, polyunsaturated fatty acids, vitamins , minerals, Omega 3, 6, 9 and rarest Omega 7 and about 190 bioactive compounds. We can expect many scientific evidence supporting the benefits of the sea buckthorn to maintain health and to cure the diseases by rationalizing it in proper Ayurvedic dosages form for this plant.
International Journal of Green PharmacyOct-Dec 2016 (Suppl) • 10 (4) | S164
Unexplored therapeutic treasure of
Himalayan sea buckthorn berry: An
opportunity for rejuvenation applications
in Ayurveda
Shilpa G. Patil, Anand K. Chaudhary
Department of Rasa Shastra, Faculty of Ayurveda, Institute of Medical Sciences, Banaras Hindu University,
Varanasi, Uttar Pradesh, India
Abstract
Ayurveda captured almost all herbs in its indications for therapeutics from the period of Vadas. More than 700
plants are discussed elaborately in various classics of Ayurveda of different periods. However, it seems that here
is a missing link about sea buckthorn alias Amleech (Hippophae rhamnoides family Elaeagnaceae). This review
article is all about morphological characteristic, properties, active constituents, therapeutic spectrum, cosmetic
value, nutraceutical value of the plant and its uses for the well-being of humanity. Our objectives are to make
this plant beneficial to all humanity as per doctrines of Ayurveda pharmaceutics and therapeutics. We had have
searched the available research papers, textbooks, and reference books and summarizes the results related to various
properties of sea buckthorn and also emphasizes the aspects that warrant future research in India establishing its
activity and utility in preventing diseases related to skin, liver, gastrointestinal, and even cancer. Contemporary
researches are indicatives of its various therapeutic properties due to its constituent chemistry such as flavonoids,
carotenoides, polyunsaturated fatty acids, vitamins , minerals, Omega 3, 6, 9 and rarest Omega 7 and about 190
bioactive compounds. We can expect many scientific evidence supporting the benefits of the sea buckthorn to
maintain health and to cure the diseases by rationalizing it in proper Ayurvedic dosages form for this plant.
Key words: Ayurveda, cosmeceutics, neutraceutics, sea buckthorn, therapeutics
Address for correspondence:
Shilpa G. Patil, Department of Rasa Shastra, Faculty of
Ayurveda, Institute of Medical Sciences, Banaras Hindu
University, Varanasi - 221 005, Uttar Pradesh, India.
E-mail: shilpa11151@gmail.com
Received: 25-12-2015
Revised: 22-01-2016
Accepted: 04-02-2016
INTRODUCTION
Ayurveda classics are full of descriptions
of herbs of medicinal uses. From
Veda to Samhita period (5 AD) and
onward compilations of medicinal plants
known as Nighantus (16 AD) have described
all plants material which was used in practice
of Ayurveda from Swarasa to Sandhan dosages
form of Ayurveda (different forms of medicines
of Ayurveda). However, unfortunately,
Ayurvedic scholars have not discussed much
about Amleech. Modern researches of this plant
revealed many strong pharmacological action
of this plant. After knowing all these Ayurvedic
scholars started searching about Amleech in
Ayurvedic classics. There is a different opinion
among Ayurvedists about the identity of
Amleech. Some say it is like Amlavetas, but few
strongly disagree with this conclusion. A minute
observation of classics established that Amleech
is mentioned in Bhavprakash Nighantu in
Amradiphalavarga where it is described
along with Revandchini, Thaikal, Chukra, Nimbu. Vaidya
Mayaram Aniyalji Suggested all these Himalayan fruits to
consider as Amlavetas, Because of its close resemblance with
Amlavetas.[1] Sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides L. –
means Shining horse) known by the names as common sea
buckthorn. Habitat of Amleech is Leh berry, Tarbu (Lahaul),
Dhurchuk (Hindi), Tsetalulu (Ladakh), Chharma, Siberian
pineapple, Seaberry, Sandthorn, or Swallowthor.
Hu Sibu Yidian is a classical Tibetan medical book with four
volumes and 158 chapters altogether. Thirty chapters deal
with sea buckthorn. Its shows it significant in the treatment of
REVIEW ARTICLE
Patil and Chaudhary: Himalayan sea buckthorn berry: An opportunity for rejuvenation Applications in Ayurveda
International Journal of Green PharmacyOct-Dec 2016 (Suppl) • 10 (4) | S165
disorders of the cardiovascular, immune system, anti-senility,
anti-inflammation, and anti-radiation effect,[2] on virtue
of its phyto-constituencies which are consist biologically
active substances with pharmacological effects. During the
last few years, research on products of sea buckthorn, that
is, medicinal and health products has greatly advanced,
and many economic benefits have been gained from it in
industries of cosmetics and nutraceutics.
DESCRIPTION
Hippophae is indigenous to the Ladakh region of Jammu
and Kashmir, Chamba, Lahaul, Spiti district and Kinnaur of
Himachal Pradesh, Kumaon and Garhwal of Uttarakhand and
Sikkim. The plant is found gregariously growing along the
river sides and moist patches of the cold desert of Himalayas
at an altitude of 1600–2500 m.[3]
MORPHOLOGY
The plant is usually a varying sized thorny shrub. The shoot
is modified into spines. The leaves are lanceolate-linear and
obtuse with peltate and stellate scales on the lower surface.
The male plant flowers in clusters at the base of the shoot. The
tepals are free and suborbicular. The fruits are subglobose,
succulent, and red or orange colored. The seeds are solitary,
uniquely lobed, light black, and stony.[4]
DISTINGUISHING FEATURES
Sea buckthorn is a dioecious shrub with an ashen brown
colored stem and 2–5 cm long spines. The fruit is a pseudo-
berry turning from green to yellow-orange and red on ripening.
Life Cycle
The vegetative buds start sprouting by April as the snow
melts. Flowering takes place in July–August and fruiting in
August–September.
CONSTITUENTS OF SEA BUCKTHORN
Sea buckthorn has been reported to contain more than
190 bioactive compounds in the seeds, pulp, fruit, and juice.[5]
These compounds include fat-soluble vitamins (A, K, E), 22
fatty acids, 42 lipids, organic acids, amino acids, carbohydrates,
Vitamins C, B1, B2, B6, B12, folic acid, tocopherols and
flavanoids, phenols, terpenes, and tannins. It also contains
twenty mineral elements especially berry contains Al, As, Ca,
Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, Pb, Rb, and Zn. Many of
the substances that are found in Amleech/sea buckthorn are
known to have beneficial effects on health. It is a rich source
of omege 3, 6, 7, and 9. It is the only complete plant source
that offers every fatty acid and includes a beneficial amount
Omega 7 (palmitoelic acid).[6,7] Important phytoconstituents
found in plant parts are mentioned in Table 1.
Fruit
The ripe fruit of sea buckthorn is a medicinal food. Results of
chromatographic analyses have indicated that the ripe fruit of
sea buckthorn contains malic acid, oxalic acid, and another
unidentified acid. These organic acids have remitted the
toxicity of some medicines such as barbitals and antibiotics,
preventing teratogenesis, damages from X-rays and side
effects of oxygen therapy.
There are also significant contents of carotenoids (including
ßcarotene, ß4, 4biketone-ß-carotene,-carotene, zeaxanthin,
lycopene, and polyring-lycopene), progestin, flavoxanthin,
cryptoxanthin, violaxanthin, neoxanthin, and Vitamin C,
Vitamin K, Vitamin E, (including a, Vitamin E) of which Vitamin
C and Vitamin E are the major components of antioxidants.[8]
The content of phospholipids in the ripe fruit including lecithin,
cephalin, phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidyl is about 0.5%.
These substances, as part of the membrane mitochondrion,
participate in the electronic migration and the oxidative
phosphorylation. It can promote cellular metabolism, and have
an anti-fatty liver, anti-cirrhosis effect. There is 0.09-0.36%
betaine in the ripe fruit, which is the methylating product of
glycine and has anti-ulcer, preventative and curative effects
on arteriosclerosis. There are the flavonoids [Table 2] whose
main components are leukocyanidin, catechin, flavonol, and
trace flavanone. From the flavonol, the isorhamnetin, quassin,
and camellin can be isolated. The flavonoids and other phenols
can increase the resistance of the human body, retard osmosis
of the capillary wall, and prevent Vitamin C from breaking up.
The physiological effects of flavonoids on the blood vessel wall
Table 1: Main constituents of Sea buckthorn seed
oil, pulp oil, fruit residue oil (values are
in mg/100 g)[67]
Ingredients Seed
oil
Pulp oil Fruit
residue
oil
Vitamin E 207 171 300‑600
Vitamin K 110‑230 54‑59
Carotenoides 30‑250 300‑870 1280‑1860
Total acids 11 38
Total flavonoids 550
Total sterols 1094 721
Unsaturated fatty
acids (%)
87 67 70
Saturated fatty
acids (%)
13 33 30
Patil and Chaudhary: Himalayan sea buckthorn berry: An opportunity for rejuvenation Applications in Ayurveda
International Journal of Green PharmacyOct-Dec 2016 (Suppl) • 10 (4) | S166
require the participation of Vitamin C; their activity can stabilize
Vitamin C in the body, and they can reduce Vitamin C oxidation.
These substances also have affects on controlling arteriosclerosis,
lowering the cholesterol level, turning hyperthyroidism into
euthyroidism and eliminating inflammation.[9] Phenols are
effective against oxidation, tumorigenesis, and radiation, and
can sustain the activity of many biologically active substances,
for example, the anti-tumorigenesis effect of leukocyanidin,
the enhancement of X-ray effectiveness in cancer treatment by
catechin, and the remarkable antitumor genesis and anti-radiation
effect of quassin. Chlorogenic acid and other phenol compounds
can facilitate the biosynthesis of gastric acid, stimulate gastric
juice secretion, combine with taurine and take part in diuretic
action and in strengthening the function of capillaries and at the
hypophysis level, regulate thyroid function.
Oil
The sea buckthorn oil [Table 1] extracted from its ripe
fruit contains more than 60% of palmitic and palmitoleic
acid. The most active biological fractions among them are
the unsponified parts, which can co-exist with Vitamin E,
carotenoids, beeswax, and the sterols with ß-sitosterol. The
ß-sitosterol is considered one of the active compounds used
to prevent and cure arteriosclerosis.[10]
Stem
The peel of stem and fruit contains 5-hydroxytryptamine
(5-HT), a rare occurrence in the plant kingdom. The 5-HT
act as a neurotransmitter and regulate human emotion,
blood pressure (BP), body temperature, and hormone level.
It can also have important anti-radiation, anti-infection
and anti-cancer functions, and can promote coagulation by
transforming fibrinogen into fibrin.
Leaves
The leaves contain coumarin, which can strengthen the
function of the capillaries, has styptic and anti-coagulation
functions, anti-spasmus, anti-vitiligo, anti-turmorigenesis,
antinumbness, anti-pyretic effects and can regulate disorders
of the gall bladder. Leaves also contain trierpene, whose
representative is the ursolic acid which has an effect similar
to that of adrenocortical hormone. It can control the actions of
sodium (Na+) and chlorine (Cl) and it can cure bronzed skin
(hypocorticoidism), heal wounds, ulcer, and inflammation.
The leaves contain ß-amyrinoley-lalcohol acid. It can dilate
the cardiac and cerebral vessels, facilitate blood circulation
and slightly lower the BP.[11]
To sum up, sea buckthorn contains so many biologically active
substances beneficial for medicinal and health products.
THERAPEUTIC USE OF SEA BUCKTHORN
Cardiac Diseases
Flavonoids from sea buckthorn acts by activation of nuclear
factor (NF)-kappa by stretching cultured cardiac myocytes which
improve myocardial function for the treatment of hypertension
and chronic cardiac insufficiency.[12] The mechanism of action
of flavonoids of sea buckthorn may include reduced stress of
cardiac muscle tissue by regulation of inflammatory mediators
and reduce the production of pathogenic thrombosis.[13,14]
Antioxidant of sea buckthorn juice affects the risk factors such
as plasma lipid, low-density lipoprotein, platelet aggregation,
and plasma soluble cell adhesion protein concentration for
coronary heart diseases.[15-17]
Gastroenterological Diseases
Hippophae is traditionally used in the treatment of gastric
ulcers and laboratory studies confirm the efficacy of seed oil
for this application. Sea buckthorn oil normalize gastric acid
and reduce inflammation by controlling pro-inflammatory
mediators. Hexan extract of Hippophae found to be active
in preventing gastric injury.[18-20] Many of the preparations
of sea buckthorn such as ointment, suppositories, liniment,
and liquids are used for oral mucosits, rectum mucositis,
duodenal ulcers, gastric ulcers.[21]
Antitumor Effect
An alcoholic extract of Hippophae that contains flavonoids
found to protect the bone marrow from damage due to
Table 2: Important flavonoid compound in Sea
buckthorn (chemical formula)[68]
Isorhamnetin‑3‑o‑galactorhamnoside
Isorhamnetin‑3‑o‑glucarhamnoside
Isorhamnetin‑5‑o‑gluarabinoside
Isorhamnetin‑3‑o‑glucoglucoside
Isorhamnetin‑7‑o‑rhamnoside
Isorhamnetin‑3‑o‑gluco‑7‑orhamnoside
Quercitin‑7‑o‑rhamnoside
Kaempferol
2,4‑dihydroxy‑chalcones‑2‑oglucoside
Isorhamnetin‑3‑o‑glucoside
Isorhamnetin‑3‑o‑glucoside
Isorhamnetin‑3‑o‑galactoside
Isorhamnetin
Quercitin
Quercitin‑3‑o‑rutin
Quercitin‑3‑o‑glucoside
Quercitin 3‑methyl ether
Myricetin
Patil and Chaudhary: Himalayan sea buckthorn berry: An opportunity for rejuvenation Applications in Ayurveda
International Journal of Green PharmacyOct-Dec 2016 (Suppl) • 10 (4) | S167
radiation and provides fast recovery of bone marrow in
cancer patients.[22] Fast recovery of hemopoietic system after
chemotherapy is observed with Hippophae.[23] The seed oil
has been found to enhance nonspecific immunity and to
provide anti-tumor effect in preliminary laboratory studies.[24]
5-HT hippophan isolated from sea buckthorn bark inhibited
the tumor growth.[25]
Hepatoprotective Activity
Sea buckthorn extract help to normalize liver enzymes,
serum bile, acids, and immune system markers involved in
liver inflammation and degeneration.[26] Laboratory studies
revealed that sea buckthorn oil protects the liver from
damaging effects of toxic chemicals such as CCl4.[27] Sea
buckthorn is rich source of Vitamin A, precursor β carotene
and unsaturated fatty acids.[6,28,29] Sea buckthorn along with
antiviral drug proves effective in treatment of hepatitis B
as sea buckthorn shorten the duration of normalizing serum
alanine aminotransferase.[30]
Antioxidant, Immunomodulatory Activity
Oxidative damage to cells has been implicated in the
pathogenesis of a wide variety of clinical disorders and
its broad range of effects in biological systems has drawn
attention of many experimental studies.[31,32]
The antioxidant and immunomodulatory properties of
sea buckthorn were studied in vitro using rat splenocytes,
macrophages and C6 glioma cell line and in vivo using
male albino rats. The alcoholic leaf extract of Seabuckthorn
(SBT) (500 g/ml) inhibited chromium-induced free radical
production, apoptosis and restored the antioxidant status and
mitochondrial transmembrane potential to that of control
cells.[33]
The extract alone stimulated interleukin 2 (IL-2) and
interferon (IFN) production in the absence of Con A and
also inhibited chromium-induced decline in IL-2 and IFN
production, it has significant immunomodulatory activity and
specifically activates the cell-mediated immune response.[34]
The leaf alcoholic extract (100 mg/kg body weight [BW])
protected the animals from chromium-induced oxidative
damage.[35] Besides providing protection against chromium
induced oxidative injury, the leaf extract also has the
capability to protect the glial cells against hypoxia-induced
oxidative damage.[36] Triterpenoids had significant inhibitory
effect on nitric oxide (NO) production and enhanced radical-
scavenging activities.[37] The antioxidant and glucosidase
inhibitory activity of the extracts, fractions, and isolated
compounds from leaves is well established. The butanol
fraction which contained the highest amount of phenolic
compounds showed higher radical-scavenging activity and
also the most powerful glucosidase inhibitory effect.[38]
In a study, different sea buckthorn extracts, were evaluated
for antioxidant activity. The reducing power of the extracts
increased in a dose-dependent manner and was highest in
70% methanol extract.[39] Alcoholic fruit extract of plant
showed significant cytoprotection against Na+ nitroprusside-
induced oxidative stress in the lymphocytes.[40] The extracts
also attenuated the nicotine-induced oxidative stress in rat
liver and heart.[41] Total flavonoids content from Hippophae
(TFH) provided protection against hydrogen peroxide-
induced apoptosis on vascular endothelial cells by lowering
the caspase-3 expression.[42]
The in vitro and in vivo antioxidant properties of seed oil were
evaluated by and their observations indicate that Hippophae
oil has significant antioxidant activity. Seed oil also showed
strong inhibition of oxidative damage induced by CCl4 on
mice, increased the activities of antioxidant enzymes and
decreased the lipid peroxidation in liver.[43] The leaf extract
was found to have significant anti-inflammatory activity in
adjuvant-induced arthritis rat model and lipopolysaccharide
(LPS)-induced inflammatory response in murine
macrophages.[44] In another study, isolated casuarinin from
the sea buckthorn leaves was studied for the effect on the
tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-induced intercellular adhesion
molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expression in a human keratinocytes
cell line, pretreatment with casuarinin inhibited TNF-induced
protein and messenger RNA expression of ICAM-1 and
subsequent monocyte adhesiveness in HaCaT cells[45] (HaCaT
cells are the immortalized human keratinocytes and have
been extensively used to study the epidermal homeostasis
and its pathophysiology).Casuarinin significantly inhibited
TNF-induced activation of NF-B, extracellular signal-
regulated kinase and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase
in a dose-dependent manner. Pretreatment with casuarinin
decreased TNF-induced pro-inflammatory mediators, such as
IL-1, IL-6, IL-8, and MP-1 Minimal persistent inflammation.
Further, in the murine macrophage cell line, sea buckthorn
leaf alcoholic extract significantly inhibited the enhanced
production of NO induced by lipopolysaccharide LPS in
a dose-dependent manner and by its inhibitory effect on
inducible NO synthase activation.[46] Recently, leaf alcoholic
extract have shown up-regulated antigen presentation ability
of macrophages in aged mice, which exhibited its immune
boosting and anti-aging effect.[47] Sea buckthorn berries
also showed an immunoprotective effect against T-2 toxin-
induced immunodepression in 15-day-old chicks.[48]
Sea buckthorn has been extensively used in oriental traditional
medicines for treatment of many inflammatory disorders.
Hence, from these observations, the anti-inflammatory
and immunomodulatory activities have been scientifically
proved.
Anti-stress and Adaptogenic Activity
Sea buckthorn leaf aqueous extract has significant anti-stress
and adaptogenic activity.[49] supplementation with its leaf
Patil and Chaudhary: Himalayan sea buckthorn berry: An opportunity for rejuvenation Applications in Ayurveda
International Journal of Green PharmacyOct-Dec 2016 (Suppl) • 10 (4) | S168
extract reduced the oxidative stress in liver and muscle of rats
during C–H–R exposure and poststress recovery.[50] During
severe stressful exposure to C–H–R and poststress recovery,
the aerobic metabolism as well as hexose monophosphate
pathway is suppressed. The single and five doses of sea
buckthorn extract treatment restricted the decrease or better
maintained tissue glycogen and enzyme activities, such
as hexokinase, phosphofructokinase, citrate synthase and
glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, in blood, liver, and
muscle, during C–H–R exposure. The studies suggested that
leaf aqueous extract treatment caused a trend for shifting
anaerobic metabolism to aerobic during multiple stress
C–H–R exposure and poststress recovery.[51]
Anti-bacterial and Anti-viral Effects
A phytochemical Hiporamin, possessing a wide spectrum of
anti-viral and antimicrobial activities. Hiporamin is a purified
fraction of polyphenol fraction, containing monomeric
hydrolysable gallo-ellagi-tannins (preferably strictinin,
isostrictinin, casuarinin, casuarictin pedunculagin, stachyurin
according to the nuclear magnetic resonance spectra). It was
found to possess a very strong anti-viral activity and wide
range of action against influenza and herpes viruses.[52] It
also showed inhibitory effect in a HIV infection in the cell
culture and antimicrobial activity. The leaf extract also has
a significant anti-dengue activity when evaluated in dengue
virus Type 2 infected blood.[53] it also possess antibacterial
activity against Listeria monocytogenes and Yersinia
enterocolitica.[54] The antioxidant and antimicrobial effects
of the extract implicate its potential for natural preservation.
aqueous and hydroalcoholic leaf extracts showed growth
inhibiting effect against Bacillus cereus, Pseudomonas
aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus
faecalis.[55]
Safety and Toxicity Studies
The fruit extract of SBT has a significant protective role
against arsenic-induced oxidative injury.[56] In another study,
protective effects of seed oil against injury induced by sulfur
dioxide inhalation are evaluated. Administration of sea
buckthorn extracts significantly protected from the lethality of
sulfur mustard.[57,58] Toxicity studies in animals were carried
out using based formulations and extracts. All the biochemical
parameters related to fuel metabolism, liver function and
renal function and hematological parameters remained within
normal limits. In sub-acute toxicity studies of ten and twenty
times of maximal effective dose, administration for 14 days,
the BW gain and biochemical parameters related to toxicity
namely serum bilirubin, creatinine, were unaltered and
comparable to controls.[49] No adverse effects of leaf aqueous
extracts were observed at a dose of 100 mg/kg BW/day in
rats administered for 90 days.[59]
In acute and sub-acute oral toxicity studies, no adverse effects
were observed in any of the groups administered with seed
oil.[60] Some of phyto actives along with their therapeutics are
explained in Table 3.
NEUTRACEUTICAL POTENTIAL OF SEA
BUCKTHORN
Sea buckthorn berries, oils and leaves could be considered
functional foods due to medicinal and nutritional properties.
Due to their functional properties, and unique taste and flavor,
Hippophae berries can be processed to make juice, candies,
jellies, jam, alcoholic or nonalcoholic beverages, or as flavoring
of dairy products. The seed and pulp oils of Hippophae are used
as a source of ingredients in food supplements, such as gelatin,
vegetable based capsules, and oral liquids.[61] Leaves are used to
produce leaf extracts, tea, tea powder or cosmetics.[62]
Table 3: Some of the bioactives in Sea buckthorn
Phytoconstituents Medicinal properties
Phytosterols[69] Improves microcirculation in the skin, anti‑ulcer, anti‑atherogenic, anti‑cancer, regulate
inflammatory process
Polyunsaturated fatty acid[70] Immunomodulatory, neuroprotective, anti‑tumor
Organic acids[70] Lower the risk of heart attack and stroke, anti‑ulcer, wound healing, anti‑arthritic
Tocopherols[71] Acts as antioxidant, minimizes lipid oxidation, helps to relieve pain
Vitamin C[71] Acts as antioxidant and sustain cell membrane integrity
Accelerates collagen synthesis
Carotenoids[72] Acts as antioxidant and helps in collagen synthesis and epithelialization
Vitamin K[73] Prevents bleeding; promotes wound healing; anti‑ulcer effect
Vitamin B complex[73] Stimulate cell repair and nerve regeneration
Zinc[74] Strengthen the blood circulation, anti‑tumor, aids in cell proliferation, acts as a cofactor for
enzymes, and enhances utilization of Vitamin A
Coumarins and triterpenes[75] Control of appetite, sleep, memory and learning
Polyphenolic compounds[55] Antioxidant, cytoprotective, cardioprotective, wound healing
Patil and Chaudhary: Himalayan sea buckthorn berry: An opportunity for rejuvenation Applications in Ayurveda
International Journal of Green PharmacyOct-Dec 2016 (Suppl) • 10 (4) | S169
At the present there is limited research on feeding Hippophae
fruits in animal nutrition. Nevertheless, it has been shown
that Hippophae fruits, seed and leaves are suitable for animal
feeding.[63] Sea buckthorn is suitable for poultry also.[64]
COSMECEUTICAL POTENTIAL OF SEA
BUCKTHORN
Many countries develops various products of sea buckthorn
which has therapeutic and cosmetic values, for example,
liquids, powders, plasters, films, pastes, pills, liniment,
suppositories, and aerosols. Hippophae oil has ultraviolet
blocking activity hence used in sun block cream. Beside this
plant is used in skin grafting, cosmetology, and treatment of
corneal wound.[21] Used in commercially available cosmetic
products, like shampoo.[65] Sea buckthorn berry oil is similar
to natural skin sebum lipids, and provide important healing
and anti-aging benefits to skin. Sea buckthorn oil is anti-
inflammatory, anti-microbial, analgesic, and regenerative.
Palmitoleic acid, a fatty acid which is the content of sea
buckthorn oil is main component of skin. It nourishes the
skin and useful in treating skin diseases like atopic dermatitis.
This oil mainly diminishes inflammation, disinfecting
bacteria, relieving pain, remove blood stasis, increase blood
circulation, and improve human immunity and promoting
regeneration of tissues. Research on 350 patients treated
with sea buckthorn cream revealed the positive therapeutic
effect on senile skin wrinkles, melanosis, xanthopsis, and
freckles.[66]
CONCLUSION
Ayurvedic scholars of ancient time discovered therapeutic
properties of many medicinal plants and suggested several
formulations of these plants in different dosages form
of Ayurveda. The dosage form of a particular plant was
decided by Acharyas on the basis of stages of disease and
diseased. After a deep rationale thought, we proposed that
for Amleech/sea buckthorn a formation of Ayurvedic Sneha
Kalpana will be best to have its maximum potency as the
rejuvenating medicine of Ayurveda. We invite the attention
of all researchers of biomedical field to have a look on
therapeutically potent plant and make it available for more
common as per principles of Ayurvedic pharmaceutics which
ensure quality, safety, and efficacy of plant products.
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Source of Support: Nil. Conflict of Interest: None declared.
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