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Danigala Coding Sri Lanka

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Danigala Circular Rock [ Lat: 7°40'50.24"N | Lon : 81°12'48.32"E ] is a unique geological rock situated in near Kandegama in the Polonnaruwa district. The aerial view of the rock show a unique semi-circular shape, affected by geological activities and weathering conditions. The location of Danigala represents an area rich with numerous geological and geomorphological formations, which are excellent representatives of this area's geodiversity abundance since the Precambrian era to present. The distinction of environmental elements relevant to archeology, astronomy, biodiversity, and cultural factors makes this land unique. In 28th July 2020, we have documented a new discovery of Petroglyphs that have been found in a part of the northwest slope direction of Danigala inselberg. Those bind runes are dominantly compared with other archeological sites in Sri Lanka and South Asia region. The type of symbols(bind runes) and petroglyphs found are quite new and for the first time discovered in Sri Lanka during archaeoastronomical and geological preliminary survey conducted by The Central Cultural Fund (CCF- Polonnaruwa-Alahana Parivena Project) with the corporation of South Asian Astrobiology & Earth Sciences Research unit of Eco Astronomy Sri Lanka. Hence, this is new discovery should be considered as our geological, astronomical, and archeological heritage site, which represents the collective memory of the anthropomorphic scenes, affected by Mother nature. Thus, those facts we propose that this exotic area get involved in a sustainable management, a viable and responsible tourism development base on Geo tourism, Astro tourism, Archeo tourism and Adventure tourism via a multidisciplinary approach that enhances the well being of the local communities.
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Presentation
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