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Sustainable human resource management practices to attract and retain talents: A new approach to human resource management system

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Abstract

Employees are the critical resource for the success of an organization and in gaining the competitive edge over others. But the existing human resource management (HRM) system is unable to address many challenging issues being faced by the organisations as well as society. The only emphasis of existing HRM system is profit maximisation. This traditional approach of HRM system has failed to help the business in gaining sustainability. Hence government regulations, environmental degradation along with the recession in which many prominent and successful organisations failed have led to focus for developing the sustainable business model. For developing and implementing a sustainable business model, it is necessary to have a human resource system based on sustainable approach, where recruitment and selection or training and development, etc. are designed and developed to foster the sustainability of the business. This article explores the drawbacks in existing HRM system by reviewing the previous literature and proposed the need for the sustainable HRM system.

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Strategic human resource management (SHRM) emerged as a dominant approach to human resource management (HRM) policy during the past 30 years. However, during the last decade, a new approach to HRM has evolved. This approach has been labelled sustainable human resource management (sustainable HRM). It is an approach that seeks to link HRM and sustainability. The term sustainability is fraught with semantic difficulties, as is conceptualising its relationship to HRM. Consequently, sustainable HRM is viewed in a variety of ways. This paper examines the major features of SHRM, some of the meanings given to sustainability and the relationship between sustainability and HRM. It then outlines the major characteristics of sustainable HRM. Although there are a diversity of views about sustainable HRM, this approach has a number of features which differentiate it from SHRM. It acknowledges organisational outcomes, which are broader than financial outcomes. All the writings emphasise the importance of human and social outcomes. In addition, it explicitly identifies the negative as well as the positive effects of HRM on a variety of stakeholders; it pays further attention to the processes associated with the implementation of HRM policies and acknowledges the tensions in reconciling competing organisational requirements. Such an approach takes an explicit moral position about the desired outcomes of organisational practices in the short term and the long term. Sustainable HRM can be understood in terms of a number of complimentary frameworks.
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The development of mainstream human resource management (HRM) theory has long been concerned with how people management can enhance performance outcomes. It is only very recently that interest has been shown in the parallel stream of research on the link between employee engagement and performance, bringing the two together to suggest that engagement may constitute the mechanism through which HRM practices impact individual and organisational performance. However, engagement has emerged as a contested construct, whose meaning is susceptible to ‘fixing, shrinking, stretching and bending’. It has furthermore not yet been scrutinised from a critical HRM perspective, nor have the societal and contextual implications of engagement within the domain of HRM been considered. We review the contribution of the seven articles in this special issue to the advancement of theory and evidence on employee engagement, and highlight areas where further research is needed to answer important questions in the emergent field that links HRM and engagement.
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Researchers and employers have largely neglected the wider influence of Staff Word-of-Mouth (SWOM), whereas employee referral programs are an established form of recruitment. This paper positions SWOM as a specific form of WOM, communicated by present and former employees, which can influence potential applicants at the prerecruitment stage. Scenario-based Study 1, with retail employees/applicants, shows differential effects on organizational attractiveness of SWOM with positive versus negative messages and tangible versus intangible information, if obtained from strong versus weak social ties.In Study 2, a survey of retail prehires demonstrates mediation and moderation effects on organizational attractiveness of job-seekers’ precommitment, fit perceptions with the retailer, and mentoring/aspirational ties. Retailers are urged to develop the potential of SWOM through improved understanding, responding, motivating, and keeping employees informed. The study establishes a conceptual foundation to encourage further research into SWOM as a communication channel and a means to influence precommitment of prospective employees.
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Organisations need highly loyal employees in order to fulfil the needs of their stakeholders and achieve success. Employer branding (EB) could be a powerful tool for attracting employees with high potential. In this article, we present two separate studies. The first study involves a content analysis of 100 online job advertisements in order to investigate whether and how EB is currently used in recruitment practices in the Netherlands. The second study involves a subsequent experiment comparing a job advertisement containing elements of EB to one without these elements. Results from the first study show that EB is hardly ever used in recruitment communication in the Netherlands. Results from the experiment reveal a preference for advertisements containing EB with regard to several factors. On the basis of these results, we can conclude that corporate positioning, internal branding, EB and related practices could be successful avenues for organisations. EB should obviously stem from the organisation's position and corporate identity. A branded identity might offer major advantages in the war for talent.
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The World Commission on Environment and Development presented its report to the world at a press conference in London, England on 27 April 1987. The report examines the critical issues of environment and development, suggests concrete and realistic proposals for dealing with them, and proposes far‐reaching changes for implementing the proposals at national and international levels.
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Although universities have been the primary source of human resource talent for organizations, there is some question whether current university programs will be able to prepare human resource professionals for the expanded role that is needed in the future. These programs include the Masters of Business Administration (MBA), Masters of Human Resources and Industrial Relations (MHRIR), and Masters of Organization Development (MOD). Brigham Young University has also created a unique program called the Masters in Organizational Behavior (MOB). This article explores the differences among these programs and discuss their implications for training HR professionals. © 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
This article gives an overview of the origin of the concept of sustainable development by going far back in history to trace its roots. It shows how the idea of sustainability evolved through the centuries as a counter to notions of progress. The historical context in the latter half of the 20th century is outlined, in which a paradigm shift in thinking about development caused sustainable development to occupy the centre stage in development discourses.
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The concept of the learning organization has received considerable attention in the scholarly literature because superior learning processes have been heralded as a source of competitive advantage. Organizations that embrace strategies consistent with the learning organization are thought to achieve improved performance. Yet few empirical studies have examined the relationship between the learning organization concept and firms' financial performance. To assess this association, the authors obtained managerial responses to the Watkins and Marsick Dimensions of the Learning Organization Questionnaire (DLOQ©) instrument along with both perceptual and objective measures of firms' financial performance. Results suggest a positive association between the learning organization concept and firms' financial performance. The article discusses implications for research and practice.
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Scholars have suggested that a firm's reputation can provide it with a competitive advantage by attracting more, and possibly higher-caliber, applicants. No research has actually investigated this relationship, however, in large part because researchers have not assessed applicant pool characteristics but instead have measured applicants' intentions. Therefore, we conducted two studies to investigate whether organizational reputation influenced the number and the quality of applicants actually seeking positions with firms. Company reputation was operationalized using two different published reputation measures, and applicant quality data were obtained from career services offices at business schools at two universities. Results from both studies supported the previously untested belief that firms with better reputations attract more applicants. Furthermore, some evidence suggested that firms with better reputations could select higher-quality applicants. Copyright © 2003 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.