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Crisi sanitaria e crisi ambientale: quale futuro per la sostenibilità d'impresa?

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Abstract

Sin da quando in Italia si è presa coscienza della pandemia che si stava diffondendo, molto è stato detto e scritto sui rapporti tra ambiente, salute ed economia. Rapporti che hanno trovato spazio anche nei richiami ad un green deal italiano nel Decreto Rilancio. In tal contesto, questo capitolo si pone l'obiettivo di analizzare come la più irruente pandemia e la più importante crisi economica del secolo potranno impattare sulle future traiettorie attraverso le quali le imprese italiane perseguiranno i propri obiettivi di sostenibilità. A tale scopo, l'analisi prende spunto, nella prima sezione, dalle principali evidenze che caratterizzano l'attuale quadro di crisi ecologica e dalle criticità del modello antropocentrico-estrattivista messo in crisi dalla pandemia. Nella seconda sezione, i primi dati disponibili sugli effetti positivi delle politiche di lockdown sull'ambiente sono analizzati per meglio comprendere la reale portata di alcune esternalità generate dagli attua-li modelli di produzione e consumo. A seguire, l'attenzione è quindi spostata sui primi contributi pubblicati sull'argomento dalla comunità internazionale degli studiosi di impresa e, con ciò, sull'iniziale strutturazione delle principali linee di pensiero riguardanti le conseguenze negative attese sul raggiungimento degli obiettivi di sostenibilità stabiliti in epoca pre-Covid-19.

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