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Green Beans

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Abstract

Green beans are consumed worldwide because of their wholesome nutritional properties. These beans are an important part of our modern "Grab-and-Go" diet, along with the traditional diet. Green beans are rich in protein, vitamins, fiber, folate, and numerous minerals. In addition to being cholesterol-free, they also have a marginal content of sodium and fat. Thus green beans are a good option for individuals looking for a healthy diet. Along with their chlorophyll content, green beans also provide a host of other phytonutrients like carotenoids, phenols, and flavonoids. All these phytonutrients function both as antioxidants and anti-inflammatory agents in our body's metabolism. Various research studies suggest that these phytonutrients help reduce the risk of a wide variety of chronic illnesses including cardiovascular diseases, high blood pressure, arthritis, diabetes, Alzheimer's disease, and cancer. Fortunately, many green beans can be found year-round, and they can easily be included in a wide array of cultural cuisines. To reap the many impressive health benefits of green beans, we must make sure to include a variety of these beans in our diet.
... (Coronado et al., 2015).Within this research, the quantification of these substances was not considered, which leaves open an opportunity to deepen the nutraceutical study of green beans in what has to do with their phytochemical profile. Additionally, several research studies suggest that these phytonutrients help reduce the risk of a wide range of chronic diseases including cardiovascular disease, high blood pressure, arthritis, diabetes, Alzheimer's disease, and cancer (Chaurasia, 2020), increasing interest in this type of crop as a source of nutrients in environments that are increasingly vulnerable to access to high-value food sources, especially basic basket legumes. ...
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The main objective of this paper was to determine the effects of four edaphic sources and two tillage systems on the yield and nutritional properties of green beans in volcanic soil in the Ecuadorian Andes. For this propose, an experimental design of complete random blocks was established in the field according to the treatments in divided plots, where the main plots were the tillage systems and the subplots the following: edaphic sources such as chemical, organic fertilizers, and biofertilizers. The evaluation of the yield, the plant height, and the nutritional content of the green beans was carried out. Nutritional quality is not affected by the nutrient supply source used, chemical fertilization, organic or biofertilizers. However, the best yield results were obtained for the treatment of compost enriched with Mexican Rhizobium spp. (84.64 g per plant), and minimum tillage with the edaphic amendment of compost enriched with Ecuadorian Rhizobium spp., (93.49 g per plant). The application of rhizobia and compost did not present statistically significant differences in the plant growth response variable. The Ecuadorian rhizobia strain had a better performance than the Mexican strain, which is related to its level of adaptation to agroclimatic conditions.
... Green beans have been used to reduce the risk of various chronic illnesses, including cardiovascular diseases, high blood pressure, arthritis, diabetes, Alzheimer's disease, and cancer Biological components of beans have been used to boost fertility for female reproduction. . [54] ...
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The current review is informed about the effectiveness of plant-derived functional components that aids in the regulation and health of endocrine glands. The endocrine glands include the thyroid, adrenal, hypothalamus, pituitary and pineal, ovaries and testes that play vital functions in our body such as growth and development, metabolism, mood and reproduction controlled by hormones. The abnormalities in the functions of endocrine glands are formed various disorders, some major disorders are diabetes, goiter, kidney problem, brain-related diseases and PCOS. Different parts of plant-based foods (fruits, vegetables, cereals, beans, legumes, herbs and spices) are composed of vitamins, minerals, antioxidants and phenolic compounds that help support different body functions. It is concluded that plant-based foods are a rich source of functional components that play a valuable role in regulating the function of the endocrine glands. ARTICLE HISTORY
... Therefore, we used frozen green beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) to stimulate industrial processes. Green beans are rich source of proteins, vitamins (vitamins B and C), fiber, folate, numerous beneficial minerals, and carotenoids, flavonoids, and other polyphenols (Abu-Reidah et al., 2013;Chaurasia, 2020;Martins & Silva, 2004). Preblanched frozen cut green beans (Bird's Eye Foods Ltd.) were purchased from a local market and stored in a freezer at −18 °C. ...
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This study investigated the impact of two pasteurization methods on the quality of ready-to-eat green beans during storage at 2 and 7 °C. Green beans were preheated to 45 °C, then subjected to high pressure processing (HPP) at 600 MPa, 20 min. Green beans were also pasteurized by a microwave-assisted pasteurization system (MAPS) with a minimum pasteurization value of P90 °C = 10 min. Total plate counts after the treatments were below the detection limit (< 10 CFU/g) but increased to ~ 105–6 CFU/g after 1 week at 7 °C and 4 weeks at 2 °C storage. We observed swelling in high pressure- and MAPS-treated pouches at 3 and 5 weeks of storage at 7 °C, respectively, along with a sharp pH reduction. Growth of Clostridium beijerinckii and Paenibacillus spp. was detected in the swollen and non-swollen pouches after 7 weeks of storage at 7 °C, respectively. Both treatments resulted in a similar reduction in a* value, hue angle, and chlorophyll a and b. Both methods resulted in reductions in firmness, yet HPP caused less reduction compared to MAPS. Based on observed package swelling and changes in pH values, the shelf life of the treated green beans was determined to be 6 weeks for HPP and 12 weeks for MAPS, respectively, when stored at 2 °C or less, and 2 and 3 weeks, respectively, when stored at 7 °C.
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This study was conducted to investigate the minimum doses of the imazamox active ingredient (ai) that provide satisfactory efficacy (>90%) against fat hen (Chenopodium album L.) and common cocklebur (Xanthium strumarium L.). These two weeds are among the most troublesome weeds of bean fields. The minimum dose studies were carried out separately in the 2–4 and 6–8 true leaf stages of both weeds. The experiments were carried out in pots under greenhouse conditions. The experiments were repeated three times. In the first two experiments, the recommended dose of imazamox (100%) together with 75%, 50% and 25% doses were applied to the weeds during the above-mentioned leaf stages. Some pots were left untreated for control. In the third experiments, 12.50% and 6.25% of the recommended doses were also tested. Plant height and the number of leaves were recorded on the 1st, 3rd, 5th, 7th, 14th, 21st and 28th days following the herbicide application. As a result of the studies, it was determined that nearly half the recommended dose (48.18 g ai/da) provides 90% success in the control of common cocklebur (X. strumarium L.) when applied at the 2–4 true leaf stages, while a lower dose (36.11 g ai/da) is required for obtaining the same control when applied at the 6–8 true leaf stages. For the fat hen (C. album L.), only a 17.69 g ai/da application dose was found to provide 90% control at the period of 2–4 true leaves, while 21.21 g ai/da was noted to provide 90% control when applied at the 6–8 true leaf stage. The results suggest that the increase in leaf area reduces the imazamox requirement for the control of X. strumarium.
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