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The sustainability balanced scorecard: An introduction to the SBSC and its links to accounting and reporting

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This chapter summarizes the theoretical and conceptual foundations of sustainability balanced scorecard (SBSC), which have been published and developed further over the past fifteen years. It provides a theoretical and conceptual overview of the SBSC approach according to F. Figge and S. Schaltegger and T. Dyllick. The chapter presents a summary of an early, yet comprehensive and insightful case study on Hamburg Airport, which has been extended and adapted. It discusses some general relationships between SBSCs and performance measurement and reporting. The case of Hamburg Airport is prototypical regarding the practical implementation of an integrated measurement and reporting system. The chapter introduces a framework based on a combination of the SBSC and sustainability accounting and reporting. The case of Hamburg Airport includes several different interactions between business, the natural environment, and society. Dealing with these interactions is the purpose of sustainability performance measurement and management.

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Sustainability performance management is a newly emerging term which addresses the social, environmental and economic (performance) aspects of corporate management in general and of corporate sustainability management in particular. The management of sustainability performance requires a sound management framework which firstly links environmental and social management with the business and competitive strategy and management and, secondly, that integrates environmental and social information with economic business information and sustainability reporting. This contribution addresses the link between the Sustainability Balanced Scorecard as a strategic information and management approach, sustainability accounting as a supporting measurement approach and sustainability reporting for communication and reporting.
Analysis of the Implementation of a Sustainability Balanced Scorecard at Hamburg Airport: Application of Performance Indicators to Selected Causal Chains
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