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Abstract

Genderwashing is an organizational tool that presents the myth of gender equality in organizations through discourse and text. To critique this organizational myth, this paper contributes a new perspective and theoretical definition for genderwashing. We outline how genderwashing activities are underpinned by economic over ethical motives, which are grounded in a desire to uphold an organization’s reputation, sometimes at the expense of employee well-being. Our presentation of genderwashing is grounded not only in the work of Critical Human Resource Development (CHRD), but also in Dorothy Smith’s concept of ruling relations. These lenses enable us to examine how superficial attempts to address gender inequality within organizations fail to create structural change or disrupt engrained power dynamics. Furthermore, drawing on Sara Ahmed’s work on diversity and institutional silencing, we argue that genderwashing represents an organizational stance that purports to practice equality, even while women and other marginalized individuals experience little or no advancement. In regards to gender inequalities, we focus on how one organizational text, the Non-Disclosure Agreement (NDA) works to reinforce gender inequalities in organizations. We conclude with a call to action for practitioners and scholars offering suggestions for how to move beyond the stultifying practices of organizational genderwashing.
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This chapter presents and critically builds upon research carried out for the PERCEPTIONS Horizon 2020 project. In particular, it examines the stakeholder mapping and empirical research conducted with stakeholders. The chapter’s objective is to pinpoint key links between migration-related narratives observed in the literature examined in a systematic literature review (SLR) and dynamics of knowledge production among stakeholders involved (academia, policy makers, migrant groups, NGOs, etc.), arguing that creating and sharing information is a multi-directional process that results in heterogeneous migration perceptions and complex impacts. The discussion opens by mapping the involvement of stakeholders in the production and imparting of migration knowledge, as well as the impact of that knowledge vis-a-vis policy decisions and individual migration choices. It then proceeds to undertake a deeper exploration into the role information and communication technology plays in migration, as explored in the current literature reviewed for the SLR. The chapter culminates in two case studies conducted for the PERCEPTIONS project: (1) the changing dynamics among stakeholders in Bulgaria, illustrating the modalities of knowledge production during periods of crisis and rebuilding/restructuring of stakeholder environment and (2) the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on stakeholder knowledge production and engagement with migrants, asylum seekers and refugees using ICTs in the UK.
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The organizations and institutions with which we interact in our everyday lives are heavily implicated in the rising levels of global inequality. We develop understanding of the ways in which a preference in social structures for the free market over other forms of economic organization has made inequality almost inevitable. This has been accompanied by organizational practices such as hiring, promotion and reward allocation, that maintain and enhance societal inequalities. The mutually constitutive relationship between organizations and institutions in the reproduction of inequality are exposed throughout.
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An enduring challenge for HRD is ensuring academic research achieves impact on professional practice. We have located this research within debates about the research-practice gap. To investigate this challenge, we analyse case studies of academic impact from all disciplines submitted to the United Kingdom’s 2014 research assessment exercise (REF 2014). We found that Learning and Development was a primary focus of significant number of impact case studies submitted across all disciplines compared to other areas of HR and HRD. We also found that Learning and Development was a key path to Impact. These findings reveal that Learning and Development in a work context plays a pivotal role in helping researchers irrespective of discipline achieve impact. Our findings therefore speak to the research-practice gap across academia. We conclude by considering the potential role for HRD in generating impact.
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The purpose of this article is to question whether or not social injustice should matter to human resource development (HRD). The goal is to invoke a sense of moral agency and responsiveness within the HRD community for having more candid and open conversations about social injustice and the lived experiences of marginalized individuals. In this article, a social justice paradigm will be suggested as a dedicated platform for studying social justice as a necessary outcome of social injustice. Organizational social justice will be introduced as a progressive workplace norm that envisions an equal balance of social justice outcomes for all members in organizations and places of work.
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My work and thinking as a feminist sociologist have been profoundly influenced by the understanding I developed of the materialist method, as it was first formulated in Marx and Engels’s The German Ideology. The interpretation of Marx’s method explored in this chapter originated in my interest in finding a method of inquiry other than those in which I had been trained, which replicated the objectifying androcentrism of the ruling relations.1 In this chapter I present a reading of this aspect of Marx’s epistemology that differs substantially from how it is generally viewed. Though my reading has been close and carefully repeated and renewed over the years, it is still one that examines Marx’s thinking dialogically, being focused on what he can teach me of his method of inquiry, rather than on an explication of his theory.