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Corruption is one of the most serious problems in various areas of its occurrence worldwide. Understanding the diversity of corruption typologies, as well as their behavior through various indicators, is a first step in finding solutions. One of the underrated fields has been the perspective of the cultural elements of corruption. This research highlights the elements of political culture that may be related to tolerance to corruption. Through data from the 2012 National Suvrvey of Political Culture in Mexico, some elements such as preferences for democracy or partisans are analyzed, in order to find elements to empirically explain how the logics of the functioning of the political system can have an effect on the increase and persistence of corruption in the Mexican case. A multiple correspondence analysis is developed, as well as a multinomial logistic regression model to calculate the relative risk of choosing dishonest, incapable politicians or none at all. It is found that preferring any political party, being tolerant to the ideas of others, preferring democracies, not accepting the corruption of public officials, having a critical attitude towards government transparency and having more educative level are elements of political culture that help to decrease tolerance to corruption in the choice of political profiles.
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