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The paper presents the most comprehensive and large-scale study to date on how students perceive the impacts of the first wave of COVID-19 crisis in early 2020 on various aspects of their lives on a global level. With a sample of 30,383 students from 62 countries, the study reveals that amid the worldwide lockdown and transition to online learning students were most satisfied with the support provided by teaching sta� and their universities’ public relations. Still, deficient computer skills and the perception of a higher workload prevented them from perceiving their own improved performance in the new teaching environment. Students were mainly concerned about issues to do with their future professional career and studies, and experienced boredom, anxiety, and frustration. The pandemic has led to the adoption of particular hygienic behaviours (e.g., wearing masks, washing hands) and discouraged certain daily practices (e.g., leaving home, shaking hands). Students were also more satisfied with the role played by hospitals and universities during the epidemic compared to the governments and banks. The findings also show that students with certain socio-demographic characteristics (male, part-time, first-level, applied sciences, a lower living standard, from Africa or Asia) were significantly less satisfied with their academic work/life during the crisis, whereas female, full-time, first-level students and students faced with financial problems were generally a�ected more by the pandemic in terms of their emotional life and personal circumstances. Key factors influencing students’ satisfaction with the role of their university are also identified. Policymakers and higher education institutions around the world may benefit from these findings while formulating policy recommendations and strategies to support students during this and any future pandemics.
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... In 2020, the world faced COVID-19 pandemic lockdown and by the end of March 2020, almost all the institutions were closed (UNESCO, 2020), affecting 70% of the student population around the world. This resulted in the highest 'online movement' in the history of education (Aristovnik et al., 2020). With minimal time to convert into remote learning, lack of planning and unfamiliarity of new online resources by students and teachers, this transition was different from conventional well-planned online learning experiences. ...
... But the studies with focus on 'pedagogy-in-pandemic' are either [1] country specific-Indonesia (Rahiem, 2020), China (Cao et al., 2020;Xiao & Li, 2020), Philippines (Toquero, 2020), India (Kapasia et al., 2020) or [2] subject specific-chemistry (Riley & McNeil, 2020), Medical (Sahi et al., 2020) or [3] based on students' life issues, wellbeing and engagement (Edelhauser E., 2020;Sahu P., 2020). Some studies have been done on the 'emergency pedagogical shift' (Toquero, 2020) and a every few studies focus on multi-country or multi-discipline contexts (Aristovnik et al., 2020;Reznik et al., 2020). Furthermore, almost all of them established their findings on quantitative data analysis. ...
... The global COVID-19 pandemic resulted in cancelling on-campus classes and forcing tertiary level students to shift to a complete online learning solution in a very short period of time (Milman, 2020). After the first shutdown of Chinese education system at the beginning of 2020 (Xiao & Li, 2020), soon most of the higher education institutions around the world chose to cancel all face-to-face classes including laboratories, libraries and sport activities (Aristovnik et al., 2020). UNESCO has estimated that 91.2% of the institutions and schools around the globe were closed by the end of March 2020 resulting from 192 countrywide closures. ...
Article
COVID-19 pandemic has affected the entire world in many ways. It has sparked a prominent pedagogical shift for university level students, as it has changed the way students learn, attend classes, or communicate with teachers. Globally, every student is forced to adopt Emergency Remote Learning (ERL) as a result of immediate transformation of physical classes into remote education. This two-fold study investigated the differences between traditional distance, online, and virtual learning solutions and the new Emergency Remote Learning (ERL) method for the university level education. Furthermore, a pragmatic mix-method study is conducted in the form of surveys, semi-structured interviews, and diary study spanning across 10 months of pandemic, to examine self-reported insights on ERL challenges, experiences, and learning engagement of the students from Finland and India. Cumulative findings suggest that scheduling, distractions, pessimistic emotions, longer durations, and concentration were the highest challenges faced by the students which impacted their learning experiences and engagement. The study also found that the ERL specific factors like low-interactivity, technical limitations, non-structured, and non-standardized methods had a prominent impact on the effectiveness of remote education. Furthermore, the study has suggested guidelines for improving remote learning experience as a futuristic solution beyond COVID-19 pandemic.
... Institutions of higher education worldwide are undergoing distressing change because of the COVID-19 pandemic. [1][2][3] University students are increasingly among the most strongly affected groups by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-Cov-2) infection. It is because of the university students are recognized as a vulnerable population, suffering from the pandemic due to a multitude of factors. 2 Thus, the reopening of college campuses communal residency in on-campus and off-campus housing, they all feed in one cafeteria, and the necessity to travel between their home and campus during the COVID-19 pandemic. ...
... It is because of the university students are recognized as a vulnerable population, suffering from the pandemic due to a multitude of factors. 2 Thus, the reopening of college campuses communal residency in on-campus and off-campus housing, they all feed in one cafeteria, and the necessity to travel between their home and campus during the COVID-19 pandemic. [4][5][6] To avert this fast spreading of coronavirus, countries worldwide have been taking different measures, such as social distancing, partial and comprehensive lockdowns, closing schools and businesses, and/or wearing face masks in public. ...
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Background Universities are places where students live and study in close contact to each other. Nowadays, the foundations of this particular group have been affected significantly by the rapid spread of the coronavirus disease 2019. The severity of the COVID-19 pandemic has demanded the emergency use of COVID-19 vaccines. However, there is still limited evidence in COVID-19 vaccine acceptability and perceived barriers among some subgroups, including university students. This study aimed to assess vaccine acceptance, associated factors, and perceived barriers among university students, Ethiopia. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted in January 2021 at Debre Berhan University among 423 students. The participants were selected using simple random sampling technique. A semi-structured, pretested, and self-administered questionnaire was used to collect the data. Multivariable logistic-regression model was fitted to identify factors associated with vaccine acceptance. An adjusted odds ratio with 95% confidence interval and its p-value of ≤0.05 was used to declare significant association. Results The proportion of the COVID-19 vaccine acceptance was 69.3% (95% CI: 65, 74). Being knowledgeable (AOR: 2.43, CI: 1.57, 3.77), being a health science student (AOR: 2.25, CI: 1.43, 3.54), and being in a family practicing COVID-19 prevention (AOR: 1.73, CI: 1.06, 2.81) were found to be factors associated with COVID-19 vaccine acceptance. Conclusion Though, this study found a 69.3% acceptance of COVID-19 vaccine, there were noticeable perceived barriers and related factors in vaccine acceptance hesitancy. Thus, health education and communication regarding the vaccine are very crucial to alleviate the identified barriers.
... The current pandemic period has pushed university students to face a wide variety of demands, involving both academic and non-academic, which invariably could affect their wellbeing. There are reports linking students with increased stress levels and anxiety, including symptoms of depression due to changes to learning, the uncertainty of university education, decreased family income, technological issues related to online classes, among others (Aristovnik et al., 2020). With stress being triggered by the ongoing pandemic, stressors experienced by students majorly include financial restraints, uncertainty related to their academic performance, and future career pursuits (Sundarasen et al., 2020). ...
Article
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Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, a new challenge has developed specifically among students faced with online learning. The challenge that arises from this type of learning is that the students faced some uncertainties and negative emotional states. This study examined the impact of perceived academic stress and depression on self-efficacy beliefs among university students studying online. One hundred twenty-three participants from two public Universities in Peninsula Malaysia participated through an online google form, which consists of three instruments which are Perception of Academic Stress Scale (PASS), General Self-efficacy (GSE), as well as Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS). Findings from Pearson correlation revealed a low negative correlation between general self-efficacy and stress (r = -.269, p < 0.01). On the other hand, the result of a simple linear regression between self-efficacy and perceived academic stress was significant with B = -2.30, p < 0.05. Students with higher levels of academic stress tend to experience depressive symptoms, while self-efficacy was a predictor of perceived academic stress. Considering the current unpredictable pandemic situation, with support from school psychologists and counselors, students are expected to heighten their cognitive drives and beliefs, including the motivation to overcome the challenges inherent in online learning.
... Younger students may experience greater fear because of three major reasons. First, younger students (i.e., between 18 and 24 years, irrespective of academic status) tend to be more angst about their academic future as well as their ability to pay for their university/college education as compared to older students (Aristovnik et al., 2020). Second, due to the bombardment of COVID-19 news, younger students-who are constantly glued to social media-may be more exposed to risk-elevating messages than older students (Huckins et al., 2020). ...
Article
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This study determined the psychometric validation of the English version of the Fear of COVID-19 Scale (FCV-19S). Findings demonstrated robust psychometric properties for the FCV-19S. CFA results showed that the FCV-19S was a good model fit to the data in the sample of 608 university students. The FCV-19S also showed good concurrent validity, as it was significantly and positively related to the Preventive Behaviors related to COVID-19 Scale and the Generalized Anxiety Disorder Scale as well as significantly and negatively related to the Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well-being Scale. The scale also showed good internal consistency reliability. Further, the association of age with FCV-19S indicated that younger students experienced greater fear of COVID-19. The analyses of mean differences revealed that women as compared to men, bachelor’s and master’s students as compared to post-master’s students, and unemployed students as compared to employed students experienced greater fear of the outbreak. Also, those suffering from severe anxiety experienced greater fear of COVID-19 followed by those suffering from moderate, mild, and minimal anxiety. Moreover, knowing someone suffering from the coronavirus, being afraid that someone close might contract the virus, and believing that the current COVID-19 situation adversely affects academic performance were linked to higher levels of fear of the pandemic. Practice implications, limitations, and avenues for future research are also discussed.
Book
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COVID-19 and Higher Education in the Global Context: Exploring Contemporary Issues and Challenges addresses the lasting impact of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) in the higher education sector and offers insights that inform policy and practice. Framed in a global context, this timely book captures a wide variety of topics, including student mobility, global partnerships and collaboration, student health and wellbeing, enrollment management, employability, and graduate education. It is designed to serve as a resource for scholar-practitioners, policymakers, and university administrators as they reimagine their work of comparative and international higher education in times of crisis. The collection of chapters assembled in this volume calls for a critical reflection on the opportunities and challenges that have emerged as a result of the global pandemic, and provides as a basis for how tertiary education systems around the world can learn from past experiences and shared viewpoints as institutions recalibrate operations, innovate programs, and manage change on their respective campuses.
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As the world grapples with the COVID-19 pandemic, international higher education (IHE) enters a new territory and complicates models that describe a third wave of internationalization. Against this backdrop, we apply a three-layer (country, institution, individual) analysis to understand COVID-19’s impact on IHE in Canada and the United States, on particularly student mobility, and consider the future of an altered landscape. At the national level, we consider how the two countries are responding to COVID-19 regarding their policies toward international students and what long-term impact might be looming. At the institutional level, we consider the pandemic’s impact on institutions’ revenue, mission, internationalization strategies, and even survival. At the individual level, we examine how this pandemic impacts international students’ plan of study in Canada and the United States, with their concern for the expense and experience of online learning and their consideration of other alternative destination countries.
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Both ICT and internet have become a vital part of citizens’ daily lives. In fact, many aspects of cities, including culture, economy, education have become closely linked to ICT. Accordingly, the concept of the smart city has emerged to attract the interest of governments, companies, educational institutions and Universities [1]. In Morocco, most universities or higher education institutions have always been interested in keeping up with the fast-paced world of technology and integrate ICT in mainstream education. However, most attempts to initiate smart universities is always faced with a series of challenges and constraints. Most of which are related to lack of infrastructure, students’ and professors’ lack of technological readiness, and socio-economic inequality among students. Most recently, due to COVID-19, universities are forced to resort to emergency remote learning and scramble different options of e-learning as a dire need to tackle the current educational crisis which creates a certain chaos due to lack of readiness to an advanced technological application. This paper is an attempt to discuss the challenges posed and opportunities offered using e-learning to deal with the new normal (Covid-19) in different educational levels in general and higher education in particular. Significantly, this paper reviews most of that has been said about online learning, describes some of the conducted empirical studies, and calls for implementing e-learning as an innovative teaching strategy for smart universities.
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Objective: The COVID-19 pandemic caused by the SARS-CoV-2 infection is of global concern. In mid-March 2020 all learning activities in Indonesia were carried out online. The biggest challenge in measuring the competency of graduates during this pandemic time was to test skills online. The aim of this study was to develop adaptation of the online Objective Structured and Clinical Examinations (OSCE) model at the Apothecary programme, Universitas Padjadjaran, Indonesia. Methods: The OSCE online method is designed using two systems, namely active stations and non-active stations with competencies tested based on the OSCE blueprint, and with the application of virtual facilities such as Google meet, Google forms, etc. Results: The results showed that this method can be used for lab skills exams so that candidates and examiners can still take the exam comfortably without being disturbed. The methods can evaluate competence using the Global Rating and Actual Mark Score, and the examiner does not find it difficult to assess the competency being tested.
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The paper is based more on a comparison of South African and European higher education students’ experiences in online teaching and learning during the first wave of the Covid-19 pandemic. By reflecting on some lessons learnt in the period of the crisis in online teaching and learning across the world, the paper sheds light on policies for digital skills development as a long-term measure to reduce the far-reaching negative effects of the pandemic for the higher education sector. The paper looks at various issues concerned with higher education policies for developing digital skills in view of the lessons arising from the outbreak of the Covid-19 pandemic in South Africa. Since the paper focuses on higher education students, the following areas are considered: higher education students vs. digital skills, higher education students’ digital skills development competencies and the labour market, as well as a comparison of digital teaching and learning between South Africa and European nations during the first wave of the pandemic.
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This study analyzes the effects of COVID-19 confinement on the autonomous learning performance of students in higher education. Using a field experiment with 458 students from three different subjects at Universidad Autónoma de Madrid (Spain), we study the differences in assessments by dividing students into two groups. The first group (control) corresponds to academic years 2017/2018 and 2018/2019. The second group (experimental) corresponds to students from 2019/2020, which is the group of students that had their face-to-face activities interrupted because of the confinement. The results show that there is a significant positive effect of the COVID-19 confinement on students' performance. This effect is also significant in activities that did not change their format when performed after the confinement. We find that this effect is significant both in subjects that increased the number of assessment activities and subjects that did not change the student workload. Additionally, an analysis of students' learning strategies before confinement shows that students did not study on a continuous basis. Based on these results, we conclude that COVID-19 confinement changed students' learning strategies to a more continuous habit, improving their efficiency. For these reasons, better scores in students' assessment are expected due to COVID-19 confinement that can be explained by an improvement in their learning performance.
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The world is suffering from the Coronavirus pandemic and is undergoing some drastic changes in day to day lives. The survey was conducted to analyze the situation of Pharmacy students in India. What are the types of challenges being faced by them during this lockdown due to the Pandemic COVID-19 and how are they getting adapted to the situations? A cross sectional survey was conducted via snowball sampling technique in which 226 participants submitted their response. The chief issue of concern to students was the change in the study pattern which has made the process much difficult for both the faculties and students. Online examination was also be reported as a point of concern. The normal life that we used to have is not acceptable in today’s scenario, hence, the institutions have to make the students more comfortable and adaptable towards the online studies and make the most out of it.
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This study investigates students’ social networks and mental health before and at the time of the COVID-19 pandemic in April 2020, using longitudinal data collected since 2018. We analyze change on multiple dimensions of social networks (interaction, friendship, social support, co-studying) and mental health indicators (depression, anxiety, stress, loneliness) within two cohorts of Swiss undergraduate students experiencing the crisis (N = 212), and make additional comparisons to an earlier cohort which did not experience the crisis (N = 54). In within-person comparisons we find that interaction and co-studying networks had become sparser, and more students were studying alone. Furthermore, students’ levels of stress, anxiety, loneliness, and depressive symptoms got worse, compared to measures before the crisis. Stressors shifted from fears of missing out on social life to worries about health, family, friends, and their future. Exploratory analyses suggest that COVID-19 specific worries, isolation in social networks, lack of interaction and emotional support, and physical isolation were associated with negative mental health trajectories. Female students appeared to have worse mental health trajectories when controlling for different levels of social integration and COVID-19 related stressors. As universities and researchers discuss future strategies on how to combine on-site teaching with online courses, our results indicate the importance of considering social contacts in students’ mental health and offer starting points to identify and support students at higher risk of social isolation and negative psychological effects during the COVID-19 pandemic.
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The COVID-19 pandemic had a strong impact on higher education in 2020. Worldwide, universities developed and implemented online courses for distance learning within a relatively short amount of time. The current study investigated how ready students were for this exceptional situation and how their readiness for digital learning influenced their socio-emotional experiences. N = 1,826 students from across all institutional faculties of a German comprehensive university took part in the online survey immediately before the semester began. Results indicate that, on average, higher education students seem to be ready for digital learning. A k-means cluster analysis revealed two groups of students that significantly differed with respect to their readiness for digital learning (in terms of technological equipment, prior experiences with e-learning, and skills for digital learning). Finally, students’ socio-emotional experiences, that is, their perceived stress, their work-life-balance as well as social and emotional loneliness significantly differed due to their cluster membership. Hence, the study points to the need to support higher education students in successfully coping with the challenges of emergency remote studying.
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Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is the latest pandemic with a high rate of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Crises like these can harm the academic functioning and psychophysical health of nursing students. With this qualitative study, we aim to explore how students perceive the COVID-19 crisis and what their personal experiences were while studying during the global pandemic. In the study, data saturation was achieved after analyzing the reports of 33 undergraduate nursing students, using the inductive thematic saturation method. Data were collected using an online form, which students filled out, describing their perceptions and experiences. Qualitative inductive content analysis of students’ reports resulted in 29 codes, indicating different student perceptions of the efficiency of state institutions in crises. All students described the spread of misinformation on social networks and the risky behavior of the population. Most are afraid of infection and worried about the well-being of their family, so they constantly apply protective measures. Students recognize their responsibility to the community and the importance and risks of the nursing profession. They also describe negative experiences with public transportation and residence in the student dorm. The fear of possible infection in the classroom is not significant, however, students are afraid of the clinical settings. Thirteen students reported difficulty in concentrating and learning, while all students praised teacher support and faculty work in this crisis.
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INTRODUCTION: In March 2020, the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic forced medical schools in the Philippines to stop face-to-face learning activities and abruptly shift to an online curriculum. This study aimed to identify barriers to online learning from the perspective of medical students in a developing country. METHOD: The authors sent out an electronic survey to medical students in the Philippines from 11 to 24 May 2020. Using a combination of multiple choice, Likert scale, and open-ended questions, the following data were obtained: demographics, medical school information, access to technological resources, study habits, living conditions, self-assessment of capacity for and perceived barriers to online learning, and proposed interventions. Descriptive statistics were calculated. Responses were compared between student subgroups using nonparametric tests. RESULTS: Among 3,670 medical students, 3,421 (93%) owned a smartphone and 3,043 (83%) had a laptop or desktop computer. To access online resources, 2,916 (79%) had a postpaid internet subscription while 696 (19%) used prepaid mobile data. Under prevailing conditions, only 1,505 students (41%) considered themselves physically and mentally capable of engaging in online learning. Barriers were classified under five categories: technological, individual, domestic, institutional, and community barriers. Most frequently encountered were difficulty adjusting learning styles, having to perform responsibilities at home, and poor communication between educators and learners. CONCLUSION: Medical students in the Philippines confronted several interrelated barriers as they tried to adapt to online learning. By implementing student-centered interventions, medical schools and educators play a significant role in addressing these challenges during the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond.
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Today, Romanian universities largely have eLearning platforms generally based on the most popular Moodle-LMS platform or on the most popular collaborative educational platforms designed by Microsoft and Google, which contain mail group modules, virtual classes, video conferencing, presentation and testing. In the context of the pandemic generated by COVID-19, the authors tried to investigate the way in which Romanian society has managed to face this challenge in the field of education. The events followed one another very quickly, and the first thing that crashed was the medical system, quickly followed by the economic environment and then, obviously, education. The authors’ research methodology was based on the interpretation of the results of a questionnaire composed of 19 questions and applied to a population of 200 respondents. The survey period was only 24 h, between 29 April 2020 at 1 p.m. and 30 April 2020 at 1 p.m. The investigated population, the respondents, were students of the University of Petroșani undertaking bachelor and master studies for the academic year 2019–2020, but the study could be extrapolated to the Romanian education system.
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The eruption of the COVID-19 pandemic has affected every sphere of life and may forever change how we have always lived and conducted our businesses, and no one can resist the wind of change that is blowing. Of all the sectors of governance, the educational sector, particularly at the tertiary level, appears to have been most greatly affected and therefore requires a more pragmatic approach to resolution. As of 29th June, Sub-Sahara Africa has reported 382,190 cases of COVID-19. In rejoinder to the virus epidemic, several Sub Sahara African governments implement the resolution to slam learning institutions to enclose the infection. Consequently, advanced schooling institutions obliged to reorganize their loom, becoming more digitally become forward, and changing to online platforms.