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Speculative Fiction as Companion Species in Food Studies Research

Authors:
Graduate Journal of Food Studies • Volume 5, Number 2
Speculative Fiction as
Companion Species in Food
Studies Research
Maya Hey, Markéta Dolejšová
Published on: Oct 19, 2019
Updated on: Dec 19, 2019
DOI: 10.21428/92775833.af03d28b
Graduate Jour nal of Food Studies • Volume 5, Number 2 Specu lative Fiction as Companion Sp ecies in Food Studies Research
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Anna Tsing, “Unruly Edges: Mushrooms As
Companion Species, Environmental Humanities 1,
no. 1 (2012): 141–154.
Graduate Jour nal of Food Studies • Volume 5, Number 2 Specu lative Fiction as Companion Sp ecies in Food Studies Research
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The NutriFungi Chronicles: A Speculative Food Fiction
Graduate Jour nal of Food Studies • Volume 5, Number 2 Specu lative Fiction as Companion Sp ecies in Food Studies Research
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Graduate Jour nal of Food Studies • Volume 5, Number 2 Specu lative Fiction as Companion Sp ecies in Food Studies Research
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Biographies
š
This story is based on a future food scenario crafted by a participant of the Food Tarot
Parlour project, initiated by one of the authors (http://materie.me/foodparlour).
Graduate Jour nal of Food Studies • Volume 5, Number 2 Specu lative Fiction as Companion Sp ecies in Food Studies Research
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Citations
... Still, this does not mean that such workshop reflections were "better" than those elicited in the everyday and more unpredictable public contexts. In fact, some of the most inspiring responses that we have gathered so far come from the public Parlour sessions (the Human-Food Exchange Club scenario, for instance, inspired our short speculative fiction story published in a food studies journal: see Hey & Dolejšová, 2018). To us, it thus seems that speculating in the everyday-naturally messy and contingent-world creates some risks but also opportunities to gain surprising and valuable insights into our design research themes. ...
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Full-text available
Digital food technologies carry promise for better food futures but they are often problematic in their impact on food systems and cultures. While proponents suggest that food-tech products such as smart kitchenware or diet personalisation services can support efficient food practices, critics highlight various risks. This paper presents our findings from Edible Speculations, a long-term design research project exploring the contested space of food-tech innovation through a series of speculative design (SD) events situated in everyday public contexts. We illustrate the opportunities and limits of eventful SD in supporting critical engagements with food-tech issues through an Edible Speculations case study called the Parlour of Food Futures. Our discussion of selected Parlour events can inform readers interested in food-tech themes as well as those keen on experimenting with eventful approaches to SD research.
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