Conference Paper

Quests als Gestaltungsmittel zur Motivation und Struktur außerhäuslicher Aktivitäten für Senioren

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Abstract

Im Rahmen des Verbundprojektes UrbanLife+ verfolgen wir einen Gamification-Ansatz, nach dem das spielerische Gestaltungsmittel der Quest als Grundlage dafür verwendet wird, Senioren zur Teilhabe an ihrem urbanen Umfeld zu motivieren, indem ihnen konkrete Vorschläge für Aktivitäten gemacht werden, welche mit einem Belohnungssystem verbunden sind. Das Gesamtsystem befindet sich derzeit noch in der Entwurfsphase. Eine Analyse der Anforderungen der Zielgruppe einschließlich einer umfassenden Befragung ist im Rahmen des Gesamtprojekts erfolgt. Dieser Beitrag beschreibt den aktuellen Planungsstand des Gamification-Systems sowie die dafür unmittelbar relevanten sonstigen Projektergebnisse und diskutiert die Herangehensweise.

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... We have also published a proposal for how the SUO network could be harnessed to provide seniors with a gamified system to promote outside activities (Fietkau, 2019). We endeavour to keep the repetition of content from that article to a minimum, but will briefly explain our approach as applicable in sections 4 and 5. ...
... This would give us the opportunity to verify whether the activity support system can help seniors discover and take part in new outside activities. Several of our planned experiments would center around the gamified motivational support described in Fietkau (2019) and will verify the effectiveness of the activity support system as a matter of course, although we expected to gather feedback from other evaluations of networked SUOs conducted in the scope of UrbanLife+ as well. ...
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During outside activities, elderly people encounter different challenges than young people. Those difficulties impede their motivation to pursue outside activities. To counter this problem from a human-computer interaction perspective, we propose a support system for seniors to improve their motivation and subjective safety while undertaking outside activities by coordinating smart urban objects. Drawing from an extensive empirical requirements analysis, we identify typical barriers experienced by seniors for which networked smart urban objects may provide assistance. We discuss a conceptual description of an activity support system: the system aggregates user profile data with information about the urban space to suggest possible activities, the elderly user chooses an activity and receives navigational assistance to increase their motivation and feeling of safety while undertaking the chosen activity. Finally, we discuss our approach regarding challenges such as user autonomy, privacy and real-world deployments, which need to be considered in future implementation and evaluation phases of the system.
... The concept and the individual parts of our system have been discussed in prior publications, specifically about the requirements analysis and the technical architecture [5], the persuasive design aspect anchored in the gamification research landscape [4], and more detailed guidance on the interaction design of small [16] and large public displays [8] as relevant to this kind of design. The following section nonetheless gives a short design overview. ...
... One of the main design decisions behind the presentation and selection of activities at our large information screen was to model them after the quest format commonly found in online games [2], in which players receive rewards for completing specific challenges, in order to increase motivation and lean into established patterns for gamified experiences. For more details on this aspect of the system, see Fietkau [4]. Among other details, this entailed specifying small material rewards for each activity as an added incentive. ...
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Gameplay Design Patterns Collection: Quests
  • Staffan Björk
Staffan Björk. 2018. Gameplay Design Patterns Collection: Quests. http://virt10.itu.chalmers.se/index.php?title=Quests&oldid=26294