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COVID-19 AND SOCIAL WORK: A COLLECTION OF COUNTRY REPORTS

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... The social service providers had active online supervision and used online platforms to share their good practices as well as provide examples of other social service providers under the COVID-19 emergency conditions. The collection of 16 country reports by IASSW International Association of Schools of Social Work (IASSW) recognises social work responsibilities in line with epidemiological safety measures and restrictions necessary to prevent infection and stresses the importance of necessary legislative and administrative frameworks (Dominelli et al., 2020). ...
... In general, there were fewer changes in social service providers' work in terms of service target groups (which changed by 20%) and the range of services (changed by 32-43%), but there were large and significant changes in terms of the scope of service delivery and format of provision. Also the 16 country reports collected by IASSW acknowledged the shortages in the provision of social services (Dominelli et al., 2020). ...
... The social worker was not seen as a mediator between the person to whom the service was to be provided and the institution addressed. The importance of interinstitutional cooperation and inter-sectorial partnerships and the need for collaborative work in multidisciplinary teams has been stressed by many researchers in order to maintain the provision of services and programmes for engaging and supporting vulnerable populations (Almeida, 2020;Belso-Martinez et al., 2020;Dominelli et al., 2020;Smith et al., 2020). ...
Article
COVID-19 epidemiological security measures – social service delivery disruption and restrictions on direct social contacts – stressed the need for transformations in social work practice. These restrictions limited the social service delivery options and brought to light existing and new pandemic-related needs of vulnerable populations. The article aims to explore the transformations in social service delivery and social work practice that occurred during the COVID-19 pandemic in Latvia. The research uses a mixed methods design and the triangulation of qualitative data (90 interviews with social service providers) and quantitative data (survey of social service providers, n = 443). It highlights the ability of service providers to adapt to the new emergency situation, to find innovative solutions for the organisation of social work practice and to deliver social services in the emergency situation with rather limited resources. The scope of social services remained almost the same, while the format and size of social service delivery changed considerably. Social workers demonstrated high responsiveness to the needs of service users, the ability to learn and master new technologies and to apply the new skills in social work practice. A conceptual model of transformative change in social service delivery and social work practice is discussed.
... Z namenom zajezitve virusa so države namreč omejile gibanje ljudi in odredile zaprtje tako državnih meja kot tudi storitev znotraj države (npr. šolstvo, socialno varstvo, storitvene dejavnosti) (Azman, Singh, Parker in Crabtree, 2020;Dominelli, Harrikari, Mooney, Leskošek in Kennedy Tsonuda, 2020). Življenjske razmere so se še bolj kot za druge poslabšale za tiste ljudi, s katerimi socialne delavke po navadi največ sodelujejo -ljudi na robu družbe, ki trpijo zaradi slabega zdravja, revščine, rasizma in drugih oblik zatiranja in neenakosti. ...
... nasilje v družini, zaščita otrok). Namestitvene institucije, kot so domovi za stare ljudi, socialnovarstveni zavodi, vzgojni zavodi in materinski domovi, so v času pandemije kljub temu večinoma ohranile obstoječi način dela, a z namenom preprečevanja širjenja virusa prepovedale obiske (Banks idr., 2020;Dominelli, Harrikari, Mooney, Leskošek in Kennedy Tsonuda, 2020;Harrikari, Romakkaniemi, Tiitinen in Ovaskainen, 2021;gl. tudi članek Mešl in Leskošek v tej številki). ...
... A pressing policy response to support children and families in the context of COVID-19 (summarized after Dominelli et al., 2020). ...
Book
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This compendium presents national reports about the contexts, current developments, and policy actions in the area of child and family support in 27 countries across vEurope. The collection throws light on the conceptualisation and delivery Family Support in Europe, which is one of therein areas of interest with the European Family Support Network (Eurofamneyt) funded by COST.
... A pressing policy response to support children and families in the context of COVID-19 (summarized after Dominelli et al., 2020). ...
Book
Full-text available
This compendium presents national reports about the contexts, current developments, and policy actions in the area of child and family support in 27 countries across Europe. The collection throws light on the conceptualisation and delivery of Family Support in Europe, which is one of the main areas of interest within the European Family Support Network (EurofamNet) funded by COST.
... Incorrect assumptions about the non-transferability of the virus and lack of understanding about care home environments may have contributed to the high death toll in Sweden (Pierre, 2020). In Estonia, care homes were the last care service to receive PPE, and staff struggled to access professional advice on how to manage the virus, including how to reduce risk of death (Dominelli et al., 2020). In the UK, in mid-May, Age UK (a large older people's Charity) reported that 'many care homes are struggling to access testing' and 'a supply chain to tackle PPE shortages is weeks away' (Carter, 2020). ...
Article
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Throughout Europe the most damaging consequences of the coronavirus have fallen disproportionately on older people who live in care homes. This study involves the analysis of secondary data sources relating to deaths, and related harms, in European care homes from seven countries between March and December 2020. The findings are reviewed using the framework of the European Convention on Human Rights to identify examples of human rights violations - namely the right to life, liberty and security, respect for private and family life, and prohibition of torture, and general prohibition of discrimination. A significant contributing factor to the scale and nature of deaths and harms is the abject disregard of older people’s human rights. Based on the findings, the authors, a group of social work academics, call for an urgent re-examination of the role of social work in relationship to care homes and the importance of re-engaging with human rights issues for care home residents.
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In Ukraine, as well as in other countries, the pandemic has a significant impact on deepening social inequity and social vulnerability of certain population groups, worsening access to social services, further digital injustice and erosion of social solidarity, and deterioration of psychological well-being. What is peculiar to Ukraine and some other post-socialist countries is that the social work (as it is not a finished “professional project”) engagements are limited. In times of the pandemic, Ukraine was also undergoing decentralization reform and changes in the legal context of social services provision. The chapter compares the responses to the pandemic situation in Ukraine with the international models of social work and the experiences in other countries on the national and community levels. Special attention is paid to the social conditions of children. This chapter reveals the prospective changes in post-socialist social work practice and discusses the lessons learned from the local context and feasibility of employing the international approaches to combat the social inequity.
Article
One of the most frequently voiced concerns in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic is ‘not to forget the vulnerable groups in society’. Social workers occupy a privileged position with a view to mapping such vulnerabilities, their complex interrelations, and the processes that increase the risk of falling victim to them. Therefore, in order for policy interventions aimed at mitigating negative impact on vulnerable groups to be effective, it is important to gain an in-depth insight into the first hand experiences and concomitant concerns of social workers. The main aim of this article is to describe and categorize the main concerns social workers had about their clients a few weeks into Belgium’s first wave of the pandemic. The data used derive from a large scale online survey taken among social workers in Flanders and the Brussels region in April/May 2020, closely following the lockdown on 18 March. Thematic coding analysis was used to analyse textual answers with regard to concerns about current clients. Concerns fall into six main categories, the most important one being direct concerns about the safety and wellbeing of clients in the context of various life domains (physical and mental health, family, work, education, social networks, housing, financial and material wealth), apart from concerns about communication issues more in general, about changes in the interactional dynamics between social worker and client, the effects of lockdown related changes to forms of social help, about very specific vulnerable groups, and, lastly, about the resilience of the social work sector. Analysis of the connections between concerns also enables us to reconstruct several chains of events that may result in specific (reinforced) vulnerabilities. If policy interventions aim to be attentive to such vulnerabilities, taking stock of these chains of events is of paramount importance.
Article
This article addresses the activities of Finnish social workers during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic in the spring of 2020. The goal is to explore 1) what types of shifts in social workers’ professional positions occurred during this pandemic setting and 2) what kind of professional capital, here as human capital and adaptive resources that are required in a pandemic, occurred. The data consist of 33 personal diaries that the social work professionals created from mid-March to the end of May 2020. The diaries were analysed using a narrative positioning analysis. The analysis focuses on three specific sets of social relations: clients, service providers and society. The results suggest that social workers faced sev- eral shifts in their professional positions during the first wave of the pandemic. Many positions were familiar, but small and simultaneous changes in several positions brought about a significant overall change in the social work agenda and the required adaptive capacities. The analysis showed that the specific professional expertise of social work concerns its ethical principles and the holistic approach, as well as the competencies needed to organize bonding, bridging and linking capital across social networks, services and institutions.
Conference Paper
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Окреслено зміст концепції "Найкращі інтереси дитини" відповідно до рекомендацій Комітету ООН з прав дитини
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In many countries, the media portray the social work profession in a negative light. The impact of such coverage has been an enduring concern with many commentators signifying the profound consequences for practice and professional morale. However, more investigation is required into how social work has been represented in the Irish ‘print’ media in the wake of severe maltreatment to children, especially following claims of professional negligence. Within Ireland, this is a matter of huge significance for social workers, policymakers and service users. In this context, the media’s recent coverage of the ‘Grace Case’ has led to a watershed moment in the country’s public and private spheres. Using a documentary approach and thematic analysis informed by social constructionism, the study investigated the dominant representations of social work practice in selected Irish newspaper articles in the aftermath of this tragic case. Four major themes were adduced from these sources depicting the profession as ‘failing’, ‘deceptive’, ‘unaccountable’ and ‘divided’. These results were analysed with reference to a growing moral panic within Irish society centring on the role of the state in protecting vulnerable children. A way forward for the profession was subsequently considered drawing on ideas promulgated by social constructionism.
Book
The book addresses the change of social work in the frame of modernisation. Through Mary Richmond’s classical idea of social work, the book seeks to set current societal trends affecting social work into the context of a long historical line, opening spaces for the new debates within the social work discipline as well as proposing and taking some new directions in the current era of compressed modernity. From the viewpoint of social work, there still is an individual in a situation, however, the situation is profoundly changed during the past hundred years. Divided into 7 chapters, topics covered include first the rethinking of Richmond’s original idea, revisiting the modernisation theories and social transformations as well as discussion on the social work theories and mandates according to the chosen classics. Secondly, the book continues with sketching the pillars of compressed modernity and rethinking of the global and local relations. During the era of glocalisation, polycentrism, digitalisation, and hybridisation the previous conceptualisations of social theory have to be taken under reconsideration. Finally, a proposal for glocal social work vision is represented by setting questions which should be taken under the scrutinity. Academics, researchers, practising social workers and students of social work as well as of social policy, administration, social law and other social sciences will find this book to be an essential text for understanding the current societal changes, trends and tendencies. The book provides a lot of information for policymakers and citizens interested on the background knowledge for the contemporary societal situation.
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More than two decades after Michael Rutter (1987) published his summary of protective processes associated with resilience, researchers continue to report definitional ambiguity in how to define and operationalize positive development under adversity. The problem has been partially the result of a dominant view of resilience as something individuals have, rather than as a process that families, schools,communities and governments facilitate. Because resilience is related to the presence of social risk factors, there is a need for an ecological interpretation of the construct that acknowledges the importance of people's interactions with their environments. The Social Ecology of Resilience provides evidence for this ecological understanding of resilience in ways that help to resolve both definition and measurement problems. © Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012. All rights reserved.
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Global environmental change is occurring at a rate faster than humans have ever experienced. Climate change and the loss of ecosystem services are the two main global environmental crises facing us today. As a result, there is a need for better understanding of the specific and general resilience of networked ecosystems, cities, organisations and institutions to cope with change. In this book, an international team of experts provide cutting-edge insights into building the resilience and adaptive governance of complex social-ecological systems. Through a set of case studies, it focuses on the social science dimension of ecosystem management in the context of global change, in a move to bridge existing gaps between resilience, sustainability and social science. Using empirical examples ranging from local to global levels, views from a variety of disciplines are integrated to provide an essential resource for scholars, policy-makers and students, seeking innovative approaches to governance.
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• Summary: This article investigates how newspapers in the Republic of Ireland are delivering ‘social work news’ during a period of professional flux and evolving economic crisis. • Findings: Many citizens in the Republic are currently experiencing serious economic hardship partly related to the global recession. It is important to understand the shape which the crisis is taking and to try to ascertain how this is impacting on social work. The article refers to an unpublished study of newspaper coverage of social work between January 2006 and January 2008. In this context, in the second part of discussion, particular attention will be devoted to the interventions of The Irish Times columnist, John Waters. Also, to accounts of ‘high profile cases’, particularly those appearing to highlight the urgent need to establish a national emergency or ‘out-of-hours’ social work service. Here, the work of the social affairs correspondent, Carl O’Brien, will be discussed. • Applications: Social workers and social work academics need to strive to understand, and politically situate, newspaper accounts of social work and related forms of activity. Moreover, social workers should seek to intervene and shape newspaper accounts of their work. The article suggests that a recent report produced in England may aid social workers deliberations and actions in this respect ( Social Work Task Force, 2009 ).
Analysing the experiences of abused women
  • T K Das
  • R Bhattacharyya
  • F Alam
Das, T. K., Bhattacharyya, R., Alam, F., and Pervin. A. 2016. 'Domestic violence in Sylhet, Bangladesh: Analysing the experiences of abused women', Social Change, 46(1): 1-18. doi: 10.1177/0049085715618561.
Bangladesh logs highest weekly cases of COVID-19 deaths
  • Dhaka Tribune
Dhaka Tribune. 2020. Bangladesh logs highest weekly cases of COVID-19 deaths. 30 May. On https://www.dhakatribune.com/bangladesh/2020/05/30/covid-19-deaths-top-600-cases-top-44-000