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Bakgrundsmusikens effekter på personal och försäljning

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Abstract

Det är sedan länge känt att bakgrundsmusik kan påverka hur konsumenterna upplever och agerar på en marknadsplats. Vi vet däremot väldigt lite om personalens upplevelser av bakgrundsmusiken, samt vad effekterna blir om personalen i högre utsträckning kan påverka den musik som spelas i butiken. Det övergripande syftet med detta projekt har varit att studera personalens upplevelser av bakgrundsmusik i detaljhandeln, samt om försäljningen påverkas av att personalen får möjligheter att påverka bakgrundsmusiken i butiken.

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