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Measures of lesion load on white matter fiber bundles for damage assessment

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Measures of lesion load are useful to study how damage in the white matter present in different pathologies relates to changes in cognitive function. So far, most research focus on global or local volumetric metrics, an approach that exhibits limitations in cases where small lesions in specific places cause major damages. In this work, we propose the combined use of a set of metrics that measure different aspects of the lesions over major white matter bundles. We expose how these metrics provide complementary information and discuss how its usefulness could be assessed in future work.
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Measuring the lesion load of multiple sclerosis patients within the corticospinal tract
  • Klein
Klein et al. (2015) Measuring the lesion load of multiple sclerosis patients within the corticospinal tract. Proc. SPIE 9413, Medical Imaging 2015: Image Processing
Lesion load may predict long-term cognitive dysfunction in multiple sclerosis patients
Patti et al. (2015). Lesion load may predict long-term cognitive dysfunction in multiple sclerosis patients. PloS one.