Conference Paper

Dynamic response of tall timber buildings under serviceability load- the DynaTTB research program and case study of a 7-storey CLT structure

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Abstract

Wind-induced dynamic excitation is becoming a governing design action determining size and shape of modern tall timber buildings (TTBs). The wind actions generate dynamic loading, causing discomfort or annoyance for occupants due to the perceived horizontal sway – i.e. vibration serviceability failure. Although some TTBs have been instrumented and measured to estimate their key dynamic properties (natural frequencies and damping), no systematic evaluation of dynamic performance pertinent to wind loading has been performed for the new and evolving construction technology used in TTBs. The DynaTTB project, funded by the ForrestValue research program, mixes on site measurements on existing buildings excited by heavy shakers and/or white noise measurements, for identification of the structural system, with laboratory identification of building elements mechanical features, coupled with numerical modelling of timber structures. The goal is to identify and quantify the causes of vibration energy dissipation in modern TTBs and provide key elements to FE modelers. This paper presents the results of one of the buildings being studied, the 7-storey CLT building, called Yoker, in Glasgow UK.

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Measuring vibrations and assessing dynamic properties of tall timber buildings
  • M Fjeld Olsen
  • O Hansen
Fjeld Olsen, M., Hansen, O. 2016. Measuring vibrations and assessing dynamic properties of tall timber buildings, Master thesis NTNU, Trondheim Norway.