BookPDF Available

Making Social Innovators. Workshop Design for and with Young Social Innovators from 6 to 16 years (DOIT handbook)

Authors:

Abstract and Figures

In this handbook, we present how you can empower girls and boys, 6 to 16 years old, to create and share innovative, concrete solutions using the DOIT learning approach. The aim of the DOIT learning approach is to empower girls and boys, 6 to 16 years old, to create and share innovative, concrete solutions. The DOIT learning approach has three important strands. DOIT combines: ● Socialinnovation-DOITseesyoungpeopleasengagedcitizenswhotacklesocialissuesand develop innovative solutions. ● Entrepreneurialeducation-DOITsupportsthedevelopmentofentrepreneurialmindsetsand skills through practice-based learning experiences. ● Makerspaceanddigitalfabricationtools-DOITactivitiesarecarriedoutinopenworkshops using digital tools with maker education as the core. The DOIT consortium developed and tested materials in 10 European countries with different target groups in different settings: with children of different age groups (6-10 years, 11-16 years), children within and outside of school settings, children with less privileged background, children with disabilities, children in rural areas, and advanced young makers and social entrepreneurs. Girls are typically underrepresented in makerspaces and technology-related activities, we focused on them as well. ******** DOIT (2019). Making Social Innovators. Workshop Design for and with Young Social Innovators from 6 to 16 years (DOIT handbook). Publication of the Horizon 2020 project DOIT, EC grant agreement no 770063, Salzburg, Austria: Salzburg Research. ********** Published and available under the conditions of CC BY International 4.0, see https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ Please do refer (“attribution”) “DOIT, http://DOIT-Europe.net , H2020-770063” if you use (parts of) the publication.
Content may be subject to copyright.
This project has received funding from
the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation
programme under grant agreement No 770063
HANDBOOK
MAKING SOCIAL INNOVATORS
WORKSHOP DESIGN FOR AND WITH
YOUNG SOCIAL INNOVATORS
FROM 6 TO 16 YEARS
About this publication
DOIT (2019). Making Social Innovators. Workshop Design for and with Young Social Innovators from
6 to 16 years (DOIT handbook). Publication of the Horizon 2020 project DOIT, EC grant agreement
no 770063, Salzburg, Austria: Salzburg Research.
Published and available under the conditions of CC BY International 4.0,
see https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Please do refer (“attribution”) “DOIT, http://DOIT-Europe.net,
H2020-770063” if you use (parts of) the publication.
About “DOIT Entrepreneurial skills for young social innovators in an open digital
world” - A HORIZON 2020 INNOVATION ACTION
Consortium: Salzburg Research Forschungsgesellschaft m.b.H. (AT, co-ordinator), Stichting Waag
Society (NL), Lappeenranta University of Technology (FI), Zentrum für Soziale Innovation (AT),
mediale pfade.org - Verein für Medienbildung e.V. (DE), eduCentrum (BE), ZAVOD Kersnikova (SI),
Polyhedra d.o.o. (RS), Capital of Children A/S (DK), University of Zagreb (HR), Institut d'Arquitectura
Avançada de Catalunya (FabLab Barcelona, ES), European Social Entrepreneurship and Innovative
Studies Institute (LT), and YouthProAktiv (BE), University College Syddanmark (DK)
Grant: H2020-770063 (Call H2020-SC6-CO-CREATION-2017)
Duration: 10/2017-09/2020
Website: http://DOIT-Europe.net
Contact (co-ordinator): Dr. Veronika Hornung-Prähauser, Salzburg Research
Forschungsgesellschaft m.b.H., e-mail: info@DOIT-Europe.net
Disclaimer: This document’s contents are not intended to replace consultation of any applicable  
legal sources or the necessary advice of a legal expert, where appropriate. All information in this
document is provided "as is" and no guarantee or warranty is given that the information is fit for any
particular purpose. The user, therefore, uses the information at its sole risk and liability. For the
avoidance of all doubts, the European Commission has no liability in respect of this document, which
is merely representing the authors' view.
Authors: Sandra Schön, Isabel Allaert, Luisa Friebel, Guntram Geser, Eva-Maria Hollauf, Veronika
Hornung-Prähauser, and Frank Vloet
2
Content
Introduction 5
The DOIT learning approach 7
The DOIT programme 8
Exemplary DOIT workshops 9
From Waste to Invention 9
Our Own Granola Bar 10
Evaluation of DOIT pilots 11
The DOIT toolbox 12
Element 1: Sensitise - Do it because you can 13
Relevance 13
Recommendation 13
Exemplary Ideas and Materials in the toolbox 13
Element 2: Explore - Do what matters 15
Relevance 15
Recommendation 15
Exemplary Ideas and Materials in the toolbox 15
Element 3: Work together - Do it together 17
Relevance 17
Recommendation 17
Exemplary Ideas and Materials in the toolbox 17
Element 4: Create - Do it now 19
Relevance 19
Recommendation 19
Exemplary Ideas and Materials in the toolbox 19
Element 5: Reflect - Do it better 21
Relevance 21
Recommendation 21
Exemplary Ideas and Materials in the toolbox 21
3
Element 6: Scale up - Do more of it 23
Relevance 23
Recommendation 23
Exemplary Ideas and Materials in the toolbox 23
Element 7: Share - Do inspire others 25
Relevance 25
Recommendation 25
Exemplary Ideas and Materials in the toolbox 25
How to develop a DOIT workshop 27
Recommendations for practitioners 28
Recommendations for participation of girls 28
Recommendation on special needs and settings 28
Policy recommendations 29
Background: DOIT, the European innovation project 30
DOIT - Entrepreneurial skills for young social innovators in an open digital world.
A European Initiative 30
Selected DOIT publications 31
 
4
Introduction
DOIT sees young people as engaged citizens who tackle social issues and develop innovative
solutions, e.g. for the pressing societal challenges of the United Nations’ Sustainable Development
Goals (in short UN SDGs).
Figure 1: UN Sustainable Development Goals. Source: UN
Children develop a lot of enthusiasm, as well as skills and competences, when they are actively
involved in co-designing ideas and solutions for a better world. In DOIT we focus on the following
societal topics (all related to the UN SDGs):
living together (e.g. inclusivity, intercultural living and freedom)
education and future (e.g. school and vocational ambitions)
health and sport (e.g. physical activity and well-being)
participation and rights (e.g. political involvement, privacy and mobility)
youth culture and leisure (e.g. digital culture, social networks and media)
environment and nature (e.g. resource efficiency, sustainability, up-cycling, and more)
In this handbook, we present how you can empower girls and boys, 6 to 16 years old, to create and
share innovative, concrete solutions using the DOIT learning approach.
5
The DOIT consortium developed and tested materials in 10 European countries with different target
groups in different settings: with children of different age groups (6-10 years, 11-16 years), children
within and outside of school settings, children with less privileged background, children with
disabilities, children in rural areas, and advanced young makers and social entrepreneurs. Girls are
typically underrepresented in makerspaces and technology-related activities, we focused on them as
well.
Toilet Water Alarm, developed by MaCha
Massage Belt, developed by Yeet
Green Keeper Alarm, developed by The Football
Girls
Sensitive Jacket, developed by the Breathtaking
Team
Hydroelectric Power Station Alarm System,
developed by The Water Watchers
Acoustic Pollution in the School, developed by
Noise
Figure 2: Prototypes and solutions developed by children from 6 to 16 years old - winners of the
DOIT challenge (left-hand side: 6 to 10 years, right-hand side: 11 to 16 years)
6
The DOIT learning approach
The aim of the DOIT learning approach is to empower girls and boys, 6 to 16 years old, to create and
share innovative, concrete solutions. The DOIT learning approach has three important strands. DOIT
combines:
Social innovation - DOIT sees young people as engaged citizens who tackle social issues and
develop innovative solutions.
Entrepreneurial education - DOIT supports the development of entrepreneurial mindsets and
skills through practice-based learning experiences.
Makerspace and digital fabrication tools - DOIT activities are carried out in open workshops  
using digital tools with maker education as the core.
DOIT provides a new approach for entrepreneurship education promoting social innovation in
makerspace settings. It is informed by a broad understanding of early entrepreneurship education
that comprises personal development, creativity, self-efficacy, self-reliance, initiative taking and
action orientation. The DOIT learning approach covers the phases of a social innovation project with
(digital) fabrication and other maker activities as the core learning process.
Figure 3: The DOIT learning approach combines different methods of entrepreneurial education,
social innovation and makerspace-based learning.
7
The DOIT programme
The DOIT programme comprises seven elements which empower young social innovators:
Sensitise - Do it because you can
Raise awareness of a social problem, motivate to do something about it, feel able to
work on it
Explore - Do what matters
Collect and explore ideas for potential social innovation: What is the challenge?
Where is the need? What can we do to make a change?
Work Together - Do it together
Build a team – Elaborate and select ideas the team wants to work on
Create - Do it now
Prototype, develop solutions – Present, iterate and improve the innovative
prototype
Reflect - Do it better
Reflect and fail forward – Get feedback on the product idea
Scale-Up - Do more of it
Plan the realisation of the product – Develop business ideas, marketing material,
and find support
Share - Do inspire others
Give a public presentation – Share the story and results of the social innovation
project
8
Exemplary DOIT workshops
The DOIT programme has been implemented in different workshop formats with different target and
age groups, for example in schools and outside schools and with children from 6 to 16 years old.
From Waste to Invention
The first example took place in a makerspace in the Public Library of Amsterdam operated by DOIT
project partner Waag. It was an afterschool activity for children from 8 to 11 years old with 13
participants. First, children analysed the system of the production and use of a pair of jeans by
mapping out the product chain. By mapping out the process with laser cut icons, they developed a
holistic view of the system and identified intervention points. They were asked to come up with a
waste robot that could help solve the identified problems. The children prototyped potential solutions
in two phases: In the first phase they crafted a physical prototype of the waste robot by combining
and manipulating recycled materials like cardboard and plastics. In the second phase they made a
more advanced prototype by using digital fabrication and electronic components. They used a laser
cutter, a 3D printer, batteries, motors, buttons, LED and wheels for the prototype.
Figure 4: Photo impressions of the “From Waste to Invention” pilot process and results (Source:
Waag, Amsterdam)

9
Our Own Granola Bar
The second example comes from a pilot action of Salzburg Research with children from 5 to 10
years old in a temporary makerspace in an afternoon care setting of a primary school in Salzburg.
The pilot theme was “healthy food”. In the pilot the children wanted to develop their school’s own
granola bar. The pilot took all steps of product development from idea generation of children-friendly
ingredients to prototyping and marketing. The workshops started with a presentation of a 3D printer,
a technology, which the children had not seen before. The children asked how it works and what can
be done with it. They were thrilled that a 3D printer can be used to make individual biscuit casters
for the school’s own granola bars. Four groups developed ideas for ingredients, product names and
logo, and the children voted for their favorites. They also developed a marketing video, packaging
ideas for the “chocolate power” as well as a booth for the final presentation.

Figure 5: Photo impressions of the “Granola Bar” pilot process and results (Source: Salzburg
Research, Salzburg).
Description of the developed and tested DOIT workshops can be found in the “DOIT toolbox”.
Figure 6: An exemplary DOIT workshop description. See: http://DOIT-Europe.net/toolbox
10
Evaluation of DOIT pilots
The DOIT project has run two waves of pilots in ten European countries trialling the learning program
(Austria, Belgium, Germany, Denmark, Spain, Finland, Croatia, Netherlands, Slovenia and Serbia). The
pilots were organised in makerspaces or temporary makerspace environments. The minimum joint
maker activities of the children or young people was 15 hours (in practice often more) which took
place from two and a half days up to four months. 1,002 children participated in the DOIT actions of
the regional pilots.
The pilots have been systematically documented regarding plans and outcomes, and evaluated with
several methods, including standardised pre- and post-tests for creativity as well as self-efficacy of
the children and young people, interviews with the facilitators, and feedback from the participants. In
total 751 data questionnaires and 633 creativity tests were analysed. The quantitative evaluation
was complemented by qualitative information from facilitator reports, 36 interviews with facilitators
and interviews with students.
The evaluation shows positive developments regarding creativity as well as self-efficacy and
entrepreneurial intention between pre- and post-tests, and compares the results for different age
groups and gender. In addition, the experiences of the pilot participants were analysed and are the
base for DOIT recommendations for policy makers and practitioners.
Figure 7: Results of standardised tests at the start and after the pilots of phase 1. We used the TSD-Z
test for creativity by Urban & Jellen (2010) and developed a standardised questionnaire for
self-efficacy and entrepreneurial intention (n1=763, n2=632)
 
11
The DOIT toolbox
All our tools for young social innovators and for you as a facilitator of a joint activity are available in
the DOIT toolbox. This is an online collection of several inspirational materials and instructables for
projects following the DOIT programme.
Figure 8: Screenshot of the DOIT toolbox (https://www.doit-europe.net/toolbox)
The DOIT online toolbox can be used with young social innovators in two age groups, 6 to 10 years
and 11 to 16 years. It consists of materials that promote and support the social innovation process,
for example, success stories, videos and instructables to work with in your solution design process.
The toolbox allows all facilitators, e.g. teachers, young facilitators and makerspace co-workers, to
initiate, organise and design a workshop with children. For example it provides exemplary DOIT
actions, activity descriptions, expert video interviews, and research-based recommendations on
related topics, e.g. on how to include girls.
The sections that follow present the different parts of the DOIT toolbox.
12
Element 1: Sensitise - Do it because you can
Relevance
Children (as well as adults) often have a barrier in their heads, thinking they are not able to change
something in their environment. Therefore it is important to show them that they can make a
difference. When children see that other children developed ideas and solutions to problems, they
become aware of their own strengths, become more motivated: It strengthens their self-confidence
and self-efficacy. Sensitizing is the base to become active citizens in the future, in order to change
the world.
In “Sensitise - Do it because you can” you find materials to help you determine
your motivation, find like-minded people, define your scope and goals, and how
you can become a social innovator.
Recommendation
Help the children focus on their strengths and encourage them to think positive (“I can do it!”).
Support their ideas, encourage them to think out-of-the-box, come up with crazy ideas. If you are
planning/organising a DOIT action on a certain topic, you can already consider specific inputs to give
the children.
Exemplary Ideas and Materials in the toolbox
Our DOIT success stories inspire children and introduce them to young social innovators and their
inventions. Maybe you can also find and invite a child or teenager in your town who came up with a
solution to a common problem. Let the children start thinking about which strengths are attractive to
them – with the
My Superhero
worksheet.
13
Figure 9: Who is your superhero? Let the children draw their superheros with favoured strengths or
characteristics.
Figure 10: The DOIT project collects about 100 success stories of young social innovators that can
serve as inspiration
14
Element 2: Explore - Do what matters
Relevance
Raising awareness of social challenges and how they could be addressed helps to identify a societal
problem you want to tackle. In the environment of your school you may quickly find something that is
in need of improvement or change. The idea is to take a closer look at your surroundings and
examine problematic situations in order to develop a tailored solution.
In “Explore - do what matters” you find materials to help you do research and
develop a vision of how you might make a difference.
Recommendation
Support the children in their ideation process. Value their ideas, even when they have crazy ideas you
think won’t work. Encourage them to explore the ideas instead of taking them down. Accompany the
children in their decision-making process. If they come up with an idea that is not feasible in the
given setting, let them rethink and adapt. When the children have found something they enjoy and
they are motivated, let them work on it!
Exemplary Ideas and Materials in the toolbox
Several DOIT toolbox materials support the ideation phase: what challenges can children work on or
what problems do they find in their surroundings? You could show them challenge videos, for
example a challenge a kid is facing (e.g.
Lisa’s Challenge
). Let them use the
Social Detective
sheet   
   
 
on their usual way to school, and see what new insights they gain when looking at things more
closely? In a workshop they could create a
Social Investigation Board
, put together information
 
 
about a problem, connect and explore it in a creative way.
15
Figure 11: Be a social detective!
Figure 12: How to build a DIY clipboard from trash and existing materials
16
Element 3: Work together - Do it together
Relevance
Working together in teams is a core aspect of modern society, as great innovations are not realized
by single persons, but people who join forces for a common goal. It is therefore of importance that
children learn how to communicate, collaborate and co-create in an innovation project. In the
process of collaboration, children learn to better express themselves and present their ideas to
others, thus developing social skills and self-confidence. Working together also means to reflect
upon oneself and to take different viewpoints. When they collaborate with others children can learn
different ways of thinking and behaving.
In “Work together - Do it together” you find materials that will help you work  
collaboratively on your ideas and projects.
Recommendation
Encourage the children to see themselves as active members of a group who can give meaningful
input. In order to enable this, the groups should be small (3 to 4 children). Facilitators should
interact at eye level with the children, in mutual respect, and let them work autonomously. They
should be given the freedom to decide their next steps, i.e. without imposing a strict curriculum.
Exemplary Ideas and Materials in the toolbox
The DOIT toolbox provides materials that inspire collaboration. Ice breakers loosen up the situation
at the beginning and set the mood for participation and cooperation. With different methods such as
Show & Tell
the participants get to know each other, form a group and focus on their strengths. The
 
 
children may develop a group identity as young social innovators through a drawing of themselves
with the help of
Who Are We?
Afterwards they are ready to find a common goal with
Picture Pieces
 
 
 
and find the steps and means to reach their aim.
17
Figure 13: Children can evaluate their personal social entrepreneur skills, and use it for the
team-building
Figure 14: Be A Buddy promotes helping others and working together
 
18
Element 4: Create - Do it now
Relevance
Whether alone or in a group - through making you turn your ideas into reality. Now the work on the
initial idea, building something physical can start. It is never about having the perfect plan but
learning hands-on and how to improve or change ideas during the process. Creating a prototype
provides an easy and playful way to deal with failures or setbacks. The makers can change, rework
and improve their prototypes. In the process they can learn how to use physical and digital tools.
In “Create - Do it now” you find materials to develop your idea and instructions
to use new techniques.
Recommendation
In the creative process the children should have enough time to try out the given materials and tools.
Trial and error, learn from failure. If children need help, they can ask the facilitators. Encourage
participants to try everything first themselves. Failure is part of the process and should be
celebrated, you learn best by learning from your mistakes!
Exemplary Ideas and Materials in the toolbox
Using the tool
Plain Prototyping
you can focus on the physical appearance and functions of the
 
prototype rather than decorative elements and colours on the surface. The
Smart Cardboard
 
 
Prototype
introduces you to the "Internet of Things", things with sensors which can detect and collect
data about their environment and send it to other devices. Don’t hesitate to try different tools, they
are quite simple and you will be surprised about the innovative prototypes your team will develop.
19
Figure 15: Plain Prototyping. Colourless materials help focusing on the form and functionality of the
prototype. A how-to work in this way is available in the toolbox.
Figure 16: With the Smart Cardboard kit children can add sensors, processor, motor and more to a
prototype, thereby making their prototype smart.

20
Element 5: Reflect - Do it better
Relevance
Reflection is important because it helps to improve the usefulness and value of the creative
prototype. Reflecting with others on the possible use of the product leads to the question of who
might benefit from it and what needs to be improved. Intended users may give helpful suggestions
on how to make the product even better. Reflecting with others augments personal skills and
strengthens self-efficacy, it builds personality.
In “Reflect - Do it better” you find materials that support the reflection on your
work. Already a great solution can get even better.
Recommendation
Sometimes children have difficulties giving feedback to others, they believe their input is not
valuable or they cannot think of anything “good” to say. When this occurs it is important to support
them. Show them that there are no stupid questions or remarks and that every feedback is valuable.
Not all feedback must be positive, but explain to the children that constructive feedback is better
than giving plain negative feedback.
Exemplary Ideas and Materials in the toolbox
With the
Project Journal
the children can document the progress of their projects. It helps them
 
think ahead, what to do next, and what will be needed for the next step. The
Feedback Cube
can be
 
used during a feedback session. Questions like “What could be improved?” or “What is not
understandable?” help the children to reflect on their prototypes. The cube supports the reflection
process and encourages the participants to think outside the box.
21
Figure 17: Feedback Cube. Giving feedback on a prototype promotes reflection and improvement. The
model of the cube is available in a paper version and a laser cut version.
Figure 18: Project Journal. Documenting the steps of the innovation process can help to keep the big
picture in mind, think about the next step, but also go back one step, if necessary.
22
Element 6: Scale up - Do more of it
Relevance
In DOIT scaling up means reaching a broader audience to explore possibilities to realize the
prototype and get support. When children get a chance to turn their ideas into reality it fosters their
entrepreneurial skills and gives them a boost in self-confidence. Therefore it is important not to stop
after finishing a prototype but to look for opportunities to bring it to a higher level, for example with
help from a local entrepreneur. This step also allows making the children aware of economic aspects
that need to be considered.
In “Scale up - Do more of it” you find materials on how to get broader support and
bigger audiences for your project.
Recommendation
The scale-up tools can be used already during the prototyping phase or in a separate workshop.
Thinking about a logo or a slogan for the prototype early on helps to identify what is its core idea and
purpose, and it is fun and engaging. In any case, working with the tools will increase the chance to
get support for the prototype.
Exemplary Ideas and Materials in the toolbox
When thinking about ways to promote a product idea it is not only important to know who will
benefit from it but also where to find support for it. The cards showing potential supporters help to
think about how to involve persons or local organizations. When giving the children a fixed budget,
e.g. in DOIT coins that they can spend on materials for promoting a prototype, they have to calculate
and use resources according to their budget. This restriction helps to consider ecological aspects,
the materials have to be carefully selected. On the other hand, it serves as an exercise to go from the
free ideation process to the “serious” business.
23
A set of cards that can be used to think about
potential supporters
The toolbox has working sheets to develop
logos or slogans for products
Children also love to produce a marketing video
DOIT money as a symbolic way to decide on
where to invest promotion work and materials
Figure 19: Examples of DOIT materials for promoting their product idea.
.
 
24
Element 7: Share - Do inspire others
Relevance
Sharing project results can inspire others and strengthen the identity of children as innovators who
feel more confident that can tackle social and environmental issues. The self-confidence of the
children grows when they can present what they have achieved, and those who hear or read about it
are inspired to follow their example. The children also learn how to communicate their results and
experiences to others. They can get and give feedback on their prototype or product, and keep
improving it or develop new project ideas. And of course, sharing should be fun!
In “Share - Do inspire others” you find materials on how to present and spread
your project story and results, and to be a role model for others.
Recommendation
Presenting the project, prototypes and other results is the best way to share experiences and lessons
learned. Organise an event at your school, makerspace or other public space, and use media to
communicate the project results more widely (e.g. a poster or video shared online).
Exemplary Ideas and Materials in the toolbox
There are many different ways to present project results and share them with others. In a final
Project Presentation
to invited parents, teachers and local supporters the children can showcase
 
their work and improve their presentation and other social skills. The
Comic Strip
is a fun tool to
 
highlight and share experiences from the prototyping process, and the
Marketing Poster
helps to    
 
promote the product idea.
25
Figure 20: Tell your story in a comic strip! - Print-out for children
Figure 21: Proud children of the Belgian pilot activities present their prototypes at an event for
peers, parents and teachers (Photo available under CC BY ND).
26
How to develop a DOIT workshop
You can take one of our DOIT workshop descriptions and adapt it to your setting, i.e. replace
activities with others from the DOIT toolbox.
But maybe your project topic, target group or partners need a different approach and you have to
start from scratch? Then, our DOIT action design canvas can help you collect all your (first) ideas. To
use it, print it out on a large paper and fill it out, ideally already with the people you want to
collaborate with.
Figure 22: The DOIT action design canvas.
When you organise a workshop to discuss interesting topics and potential contributions by partners
you are already starting a DOIT action. You could discuss issues of the Sustainable Development
Goals, how they relate to your life and local environment, and which one your team wants to work on
(see also
Co-designing an Action
in the toolbox).
27
Recommendations for practitioners
In DOIT pilots in 10 European regions we collected experiences with about 1,000 children in diverse
settings. Lessons learned in the experiences we condensed in recommendations for practitioners;
especially we highlight how to involve girls.
Recommendations for participation of girls
Girls are often underrepresented in makerspaces and projects using technical tools. Therefore, we
have taken a closer look at what is necessary to reach and involve girls equally, and make them more
interested in working with various maker tools. This can be promoted by female role models, e.g. a
female facilitator or a young girl leading the team, and focusing on cooperative rather than
competitive tasks. In gender-mixed groups, girls sometimes feel responsible for design and
decoration, while boys are responsible for functions and technical work. Both are important aspects.
But in order to break up gender stereotypical behaviour, we recommend making two activities out of
them: First the whole group works on the functional aspects, i.e. what the prototype should be able
to do (see
Plain Prototyping
), then the group works on the design, i.e. its form, materials, etc.
Figure 23: Overview of gender-sensitive measures in a DOIT action. More on these measures and
recommendations in the poster and paper Schön et al. 2018 and 2019 (see: DOIT Publications).
Recommendation on special needs and settings
Special needs: Children with disabilities deserve particular attention as they have various special
needs. These pose a challenge but are also an opportunity regarding inclusiveness of makerspaces
and to work on creative prototypes for special needs with contributions by the children.
Makerspace:
Makerspaces are now being set up in ever more community and youth centres, libraries
and schools, but mostly in larger cities, not in small towns and rural areas. Here “pop-up”
28
makerspaces can be a solution, e.g. reserve a room in a school for the DOIT action and bring useful
materials and tools there. Most of the DOIT projects used this approach, and it worked well.
Materials and tools:
In a “pop-up” makerspace you may not have all technical tools such as a 3D
 
 
printer, laser cutter, etc., and the DOIT worksheets intentionally do not focus on these. It is the
collaborative and creative work on a common goal that counts!
Policy recommendations
In addition to the practical guidance for practitioners, DOIT gives recommendations for educational
policy makers and other stakeholders. These focus on how to foster social innovation and
entrepreneurial competencies and skills of children and young people. DOIT proposes a
practice-based approach of co-creative maker activities addressing societal issues.
The Council of the European Union addresses practical entrepreneurial experiences in their
Recommendation on Key competences for Lifelong Learning (2018/C 189/01, 22 May 2018). Under
point 2.5 the Council requests that Member States should pay special attention to
“nurturing entrepreneurship competence, creativity and the sense of initiative especially among
young people, for example by promoting opportunities for young learners to undertake at least one
practical entrepreneurial experience during their school education”.
We suggest a DOIT experience for every young learner, with the DOIT programme for girls    
and boys, 6 to 16 years old. More specific recommendations from our first European Policy Brief are:
Raise awareness of makerspaces as environments
for practice-based development of digital, social
and entrepreneurial skills of young people.
Expand the number of pilot makerspaces in schools,
and of educational programmes in makerspaces.
Promote maker education with a focus on social
and entrepreneurial mind-sets and skills.
Support collaboration on teacher training and local
community projects.
Figure 24: The first of our three European policy briefs.
29
Background: DOIT, the European innovation project
DOIT - Entrepreneurial skills for young social innovators in an open digital world.
A European Initiative
The DOIT project empowers primary and secondary school pupils (6-16 years) alongside educators
to apply open innovation methods, digital maker and fabrication tools and collaboration skills to
tackle societal problems. The DOIT project, launched in October 2017 and running until September
2020, developed, tested and evaluated a flexible workshop programme. Over 1,000 children have
been involved. The DOIT programme has been proven to help them develop and prototype innovative
solutions with creativity and perseverance in various settings, be it schools, youth centres or public
libraries. DOIT pilot workshops were run in 10 different European countries. The pilots addressed
topics related to the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals, such as Living Together,
Education and Future, or Environment and Nature. The pilots were specifically designed to explore
the needs of different target groups, for example children from less privileged backgrounds, children
in rural areas or children with special needs, and took place in different settings. Based on the pilot
experiences DOIT offers activity descriptions and materials in an online toolbox and provides an
online course called “Making Young Social Innovators” for facilitators, which provide complementary
knowhow. The DOIT consortium brings together well-known European makerspaces and fablabs,
which already work with children, with entrepreneurial education as well as social innovation experts
and networks.
Webpage: http://DOIT-Europe.net
Duration: 10/2017-09/2020
Grant: H2020-770063 (Call H2020-SC6-CO-CREATION-2017)
 
30
Selected DOIT publications
All our deliverables and publications can be found on the DOIT website
Geser G., Schön S., Hollauf E.M. & Vloet F. (2019). Makerspaces as Social Innovation and
Entrepreneurship Learning Environments: The DOIT Learning Program. In: Discourse and
Communication for Sustainable Education, 10(2): 60-71, https://doi.org/10.2478/dcse-2019-0018
Hornung-Prähauser V., Schön S., Teplov R. & Podmetina D. (2018). Social Innovation Training in
Makerspaces with the new DOIT approach, pp. 1-15, in: Proceedings of the ISPIM conference 2018
Stockholm, June 2018; preliminary version: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/327449265
Schön S., Rosenova M., Ebner M. & Grandl M. (2018). Poster: How to support girls’ participation at
projects in makerspace settings. Presented at the International EduRobotics Conference 2018,
Rome, https://www.researchgate.net/publication/328175572
Schön S., Rosenova M., Ebner M. & Grandl M. (2019). How to support girls’ participation at projects
in makerspace settings. Overview on current recommendations, pp. 193-196, in: International
EduRobotics Conference 2018, Rome. Springer, AISC 946, doi: 10.1007/978-3-030-18141-3_15;
preliminary version: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/338164755
Unterfrauner E., Voigt C. & Hofer M. (2019). Participative evaluation with children in educational
maker projects: Experiences from a pilot action, pp. 194-197, in: C&T 2019: International
Conference on Communities & Technologies, New York; preprint:
https://www.researchgate.net/publication/334399080
 
31
ResearchGate has not been able to resolve any citations for this publication.
Article
Full-text available
Developing social innovation and entrepreneurship competences and skills of children and young people is on the agenda of European educational policy-makers. The European research and innovation project “DOIT – Entrepreneurial skills for young social innovators in an open digital world” suggests using makerspaces and tools, within schools and externally, to promote practice-based social innovation and entrepreneurial learning of children and young people. This article first gives an overview of different types of maker-spaces, addresses the concept of maker education, and highlights common development goals of such education with entrepreneurship education regarding particular attitudes and competences. The main part then describes the DOIT learning program that allows children and young people (6–16 years) to acquire skills and an entrepreneurial mind-set for turning creative ideas into potential social innovations. This program is currently trialed in DOIT pilots in different types of makerspaces in ten European countries. The article describes learning processes and outcomes that are promoted by the program with two examples that are different regarding the makerspaces, topics and other aspects. Some first experiences and lessons learned from these and other pilots are summarized.
Chapter
Full-text available
Several biases and thresholds challenge the reach of girls in technology-related activities. For this contribution we collected and structured existing research and good practices on how to reach girls within projects in the field educational robotics, makerspaces, coding and STEM in general. The contribution presents general guidelines for future activities with a potential higher rate of participating girls in makerspace settings.
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Information and communication technologies, digital design and fabrication technologies are valued as driver for developing social innovations. This contribution addresses the question of how to stimulate social innovation skills in makerspace settings. The European H2020 project "DOIT Entrepreneurial skills for young social innovators in an open digital world" investigates the yet “closed box” of how to coach a young person in his/her social innovation learning journey. The consortium is jointly developing the pedagogical concept, co-creation methods and specific training material for a programme that enables young learners and their facilitators to develop social innovation ideas, product- or service-prototypes or new social practises and projects in makerspace settings. The DOIT programme will be trialled and scientifically evaluated by more than 1000 learners in 12 European countries (2017-2020). The contribution describes the theoretical background; the conceptual elements of the DOIT programme and discusses open issues. We invite to join the DOIT network. Information: www.doit-europe.net.
Poster: How to support girls' participation at projects in makerspace settings
  • S Schön
  • M Rosenova
  • M Ebner
  • M Grandl
Schön S., Rosenova M., Ebner M. & Grandl M. (2018). Poster: How to support girls' participation at projects in makerspace settings. Presented at the International EduRobotics Conference 2018, Rome, https://www.researchgate.net/publication/328175572
Participative evaluation with children in educational maker projects: Experiences from a pilot action
  • E Unterfrauner
  • C Voigt
  • M Hofer
Unterfrauner E., Voigt C. & Hofer M. (2019). Participative evaluation with children in educational maker projects: Experiences from a pilot action, pp. 194-197, in: C&T 2019: International Conference on Communities & Technologies, New York; preprint: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/334399080