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Abstract

Internationally, transition from student to registered nurse is a challenging and stressful period. This study investigated the use of an Instant Messaging application (WhatsApp) community of practice to support graduate nurses in their first year of practice in the Western Cape, South Africa. A preliminary survey was conducted to determine the technology readiness of 64 participants. Following the enrolment of a further 8 participants, 76 new graduate nurses were enrolled in the WhatsApp Community of Practice which ran over an 8-week period. A quantitative one-group pre and post study evaluation via Survey Face was conducted comparing socio-professional outcome measures. The analysis of the readiness survey showed high WhatsApp use and perceived ease of use and usefulness. Though only 9 males in the survey, age and gender had no impact on the reported use. Interactions with alumni, bridging and bonding social capital, professional integration and a sense of belonging to a community of practice significantly improved. For graduate nurses in non-urban settings, bonding, professional identity and theory practice integrations were significantly higher compared to urban graduates. The findings highlight the value of a WhatsApp community of practice for isolated graduated nurses, especially in critical phases of transition and their professional development.

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... Other sources explain that CoPs can also be cross-organizational and foster knowledge and creativity [44]. Furthermore, CoPs can take place virtually and provide remote or isolated areas with the opportunity to acquire knowledge and learn [45]. ...
... In the context of learning in organizations, CoPs are also described as requiring self-organization [39]. CoPs take place either in-person [41] or virtually [45] with some regularity [38]. In organizations with cross-functional teams, they contribute to functional learning at the individual and organizational levels [26]. ...
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... This study revealed that a WhatsApp group significantly shaped the experience of the participants in their training program. Furthermore, another study conducted by Abiodun et al. (2020), aimed to examine the use of WhatsApp community of practices to support nurses in their first year of practice. This study showed the important role of WhatsApp community of practice for isolated graduated nurses in a critical phase of the transition of their professional development. ...
... As previously mentioned, the use of WhatsApp groups as an online community of practices has been addressed in several studies. Abiodun et al. (2020) conducted a study on using WhatsApp to support nurse students in their community service placement. WhatsApp groups were created based on the participants' location. ...
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... According to Chahal et al. (2019), some of the benefits of using WhatsApp in education can be, among others: a) promoting unity among members of a group; b) speed of connectivity; c) ease of use; d) is a good resource for recalling information about days, dates and times. All of these benefits were identified over the weeks of classes, as, with regard to unity among the group members, it constituted a community of practice (ABIODUN et al., 2020), especially in some classes, students came from from different cities, as the university is multicampi, and most have never seen each other in person, but until the end of classes (and, in some cases, even later), the idea of unity could be verified in the interaction strategies and in the resource humor present with some regularity in the classes -some more and others less -, as well as the fact that students remain in the WhatsApp group, even with the purpose of its creation finished (that is, even after the end of classes). ...
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... Chahal et al. (2019), algunos de los beneficios de usar WhatsApp en la educación pueden ser, entre otros: a) promover la unidad entre los miembros de un grupo; b) velocidad de conectividad; c) facilidad de uso; d) es un buen recurso para recordar información sobre días, fechas y horarios. Todos estos beneficios fueron identificados a lo largo de las semanas de clases, ya que, en cuanto a la unidad entre los miembros del grupo, constituyéndose una comunidad de práctica (ABIODUN et al., 2020), especialmente en algunas clases los alumnos procedían de diferentes ciudades, ya que la universidad es multicampus, y la mayoría de ellos nunca se vieron en persona, pero hasta el final de las clases (y, en algunos casos, incluso más tarde), la idea de unidad se pudo verificar en las estrategias de interacción y en el recurso humorístico presente con cierta regularidad en las clases -algunas más y en otras menos -, así como el hecho de que los alumnos permanezcan en el grupo de WhatsApp, incluso con el fin de su creación (es decir, incluso después del final de las clases). ...
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... De acordo com Chahal et al. (2019), alguns dos benefícios do uso do WhatsApp na educação podem ser, entre outros: a) promoção da unidade entre os membros de um grupo; b) rapidez da conectividade; c) facilidade de uso; d) é um bom recurso para relembrar informações sobre dias, datas e horários. Todos esses benefícios foram identificados ao longo das semanas de aula, pois, no que tange à unidade entre os membros do grupo, constituindo-se como uma comunidade de prática (ABIODUN et al., 2020), especialmente em algumas turmas os alunos eram advindos de cidades diferentes, visto que a universidade é multicampi, e a maioria nunca se viu presencialmente, mas até o término das aulas (e, em alguns casos, inclusive posteriormente), a ideia de unidade pôde ser verificada nas estratégias de interação e no recurso de humor presentes com certa regularidade nas turmas -umas mais e em outras menos -, O último princípio, que alertava os alunos para terem paciência com a professora, demonstrava, ao início do curso, ser um indício de sua insegurança em relação ao funcionamento das aulas. Em alguma medida, indicava ainda certa incredulidade de que os elementos constitutivos para o bom andamento do curso pudessem ser satisfatórios, seja pela sua inexperiência em atividades dessa natureza (a professora em questão jamais havia atuado como docente em outros contextos que não fossem os presenciais), seja em razão de eventuais problemas tecnológicos imprevisíveis (em seus dispositivos ou sua conexão). ...
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Este texto tem como objetivo apresentar um relato de uma experiência docente mobilizada no âmbito da extensão universitária, iniciada em março e concluída em junho de 2020, durante a pandemia da Covid-19. O campo do conhecimento em questão são aulas de língua espanhola com foco no ensino da conversação. São descritos e problematizados os procedimentos metodológicos adotados, bem como reflexões a respeito do material didático elaborado para o contexto específico da pandemia, por meio da plataforma Canva, bem como a produção de vídeos para o YouTube que seguiram os princípios do microlearning. Também, são tecidas reflexões sobre o tempo de duração para as aulas síncronas (as quais, no caso dessa experiência, ocorreram com o uso do Google Meet, disponibilizado pela universidade), o número ideal de alunos para esse tipo de proposta, bem como o papel do uso do WhatsApp durante o processo. A experiência é relatada a partir do ponto de vista discente, mediante a síntese das respostas de um questionário anônimo disponibilizado ao final do curso, comparando estatisticamente o conjunto de percepções a respeito do modelo adotado. Os resultados mostram que a interação professora-alunos foi o item mais bem avaliado, e o pior avaliado foi a divulgação do curso pré-inscrição.
... In one study from South Africa, new nurse graduates took part in a WhatsApp group-based transition programme that included topics such as conflict, stress and career management. Within the eight-week intervention the participants had a significant increase in bridging and bonding social capital with peers, professional integration and their sense of being part of a community of practice, as measured through pre-and post-tests (Chipps, Ologun-Abiodun, Daniels, & Pimmer, 2020). The qualitative analysis of the same intervention suggests that positive effects were not only triggered through moderators, but also by re-connecting relatable social ties, i.e., former students who experienced very similar situations, and providing these spatially, socio-culturally and often emotionally 'dislocated' graduates a provisional space to belong (Pimmer, Daniels, et al., 2019). ...
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This study investigated the use of instant messaging in the school-to-work transition, a crucial stage of learning and development. Newly graduated health professionals (n = 235) participated either in WhatsApp groups in which moderators shared knowledge and facilitated professional discussions or in the control group. The results show that participants in the WhatsApp groups had markedly higher levels of knowledge, greater resilience as well as lower levels of professional isolation– in comparison with the control group. They also reported less stress when searching for a new job. These findings are affirmed by the qualitative analysis of open survey questions: knowledge acquisition emerged as the main benefit followed by connectedness and professional informational benefits. A further interesting result is that the general, day-to-day use of WhatsApp outside of the intervention was linked to higher levels of resilience. Another finding is that although the actual (measured) and self-reported frequency of participation in the WhatsApp groups correlated highly, these measures did not predict the outcome variables in the regression analysis. This observation questions the frequency of participation as a proxy for the success of engagement.
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Communities of Practice (CoPs) are promoted in the healthcare sector as a means of generating and sharing knowledge and improving organisational performance. However CoPs vary considerably in the way they are structured and operate in the sector. If CoPs are to be cultivated to benefit healthcare organisations, there is a need to examine and understand their application to date. To this end, a systematic review of the literature on CoPs was conducted, to examine how and why CoPs have been established and whether they have been shown to improve healthcare practice. Peer-reviewed empirical research papers on CoPs in the healthcare sector were identified by searching electronic health-databases. Information on the purpose of establishing CoPs, their composition, methods by which members communicate and share information or knowledge, and research methods used to examine effectiveness was extracted and reviewed. Also examined was evidence of whether or not CoPs led to a change in healthcare practice. Thirty-one primary research papers and two systematic reviews were identified and reviewed in detail. There was a trend from descriptive to evaluative research. The focus of CoPs in earlier publications was on learning and exchanging information and knowledge, whereas in more recently published research, CoPs were used more as a tool to improve clinical practice and to facilitate the implementation of evidence-based practice. Means by which members communicated with each other varied, but in none of the primary research studies was the method of communication examined in terms of the CoP achieving its objectives. Researchers are increasing their efforts to assess the effectiveness of CoPs in healthcare, however the interventions have been complex and multifaceted, making it difficult to directly attribute the change to the CoP. In keeping with Wenger and colleagues' description, CoPs in the healthcare sector vary in form and purpose. While researchers are increasing their efforts to examine the impact of CoPs in healthcare, cultivating CoPs to improve healthcare performance requires a greater understanding of how to establish and support CoPs to maximise their potential to improve healthcare.
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A systematic literature review of the experiences and perceptions of newly qualified nurses in the UK during the transition from student to staff nurse. It has been widely recognised that newly qualified nurses experience a period of transition. Over the past decade there has been radical reorganisation of nurse education in the UK which has raised issues of preparation for practice. Searches were made of the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) and MEDLINE. A systematic review was carried out. Papers were critically reviewed, relevant data were extracted and synthesised. Four themes were identified from the empirical evidence base: transition and change, personal and professional development, pre-registration education, preceptorship and support. Transition remains a stressful experience for newly qualified nurses in the UK. Reasons include an increase in personal and professional development, changes in pre-registration education and lack of support once qualified. Further research is needed to address the current situation in relation to the transition period including pre-registration education, preparation for practice and support in both primary and secondary care.
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Disparities exist between rural and urban emergency departments with respect to knowledge resources such as online journals and clinical specialists. As knowledge is a critical element in the delivery of quality care, a web-based learning project was proposed to address the knowledge needs of emergency clinicians. One objective of this project was to evaluate the effectiveness of the online environment for knowledge exchange among rural and urban emergency clinicians. Descriptive and content analysis of the online discussion board revealed 202 postings with rural participants contributing the largest number of postings (75%; 152/202). Postings were used to establish a clinical presence (87/202), seek clinical information (52/202), and share clinical information (63/202). Postintervention survey results indicate that this modality introduced participants to new clinical experts and resources. The results provide direction for design of a virtual community of practice, which may reduce current knowledge resource disparities.
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Background: In any country the transition from student to Registered Nurse is a rewarding but challenging and stressful time. Nurses terminating employment within one year of qualification have been reported as 58% in Taiwan. Therefore, the experience of NQNs’ transition from the role of student to qualified nurse after being employed in their first posts in their nursing careers in Taiwan is worthy of research. Purpose: To explore experiences of newly qualified nurses (NQNs) during the first twelve months of their career in Taiwan. Methods: A primarily cross-sectional qualitative research design was used. These were a purposive sample of 28 NQNs during the first 12 months as Registered Nurses. Semi-structured interviews were undertaken with groups of participants. Data analysis was undertaken within the Thematic Content Analysis Framework. Results: Four main themes of newly qualified nurses’ experiences were identified: Perceptions of becoming a nurse; Reality challenge; Developing competence; and Interpersonal relationships. Conclusion: NQN’s experiences in clinical practice during the first twelve months employment sound very like a reality challenge. Successful transition was influenced by personal, social and environmental work factors. NQNs identified that their new role was based on what they evaluated as limited knowledge and skills. They addressed the importance of interpersonal relationship influenced their transition experiences. The findings have implications for education of student nurses and their support during transition to the role of qualified nurses. This requires a coordinated response from nursing schools, hospitals and government to increase those who adapt to their new roles and develop successful nursing careers.
Methods: Pubmed, Scopus, Science Direct and IEE Expert databases were searched using the search term WhatsApp and Google Scholar using the terms WhatsApp Telemedicine and WhatsApp mHealth. Results: Thirty-two papers covering 17 disciplines were relevant with the most papers, 12, from India. Seventeen papers reported the use of WhatsApp Groups within departments, 14 of which were surgery related disciplines. Groups improved communication and advice given on patient management. Confidentiality was mentioned in 19 papers and consent in five. Data security was partially addressed in 11 papers with little understanding of how data are transmitted and stored. Telemedicine services outside of departmental groups were reported in seven papers and covered emergency triage in maxillofacial, plastic, neuro and general surgery, and cardiology and telestroke. Conclusions: WhatsApp is seen to be a simple, cheap and effective means of communication within the clinical health sector and its use will grow. Users have paid little attention to confidentiality, consent and data security. Guidelines for using WhatsApp for telemedicine are required including downloading. WhatsApp messages to computer for integration with electronic medical records.
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div class="page" title="Page 1"> Information communication technology playing a major role in transmitting idea, thought and information between one to another. Social networking websites are a good example of communication network and it is a social structure that lets the user interact and work collaboratively with other users. WhatsApp is a free instant messenger application that allows users to send text messages and multimedia files. In this paper, an online survey was conducted to measure usability of WhatsApp for service delivery in the libraries and information centres. A random sample was selected from social networking sites from all over India and an online questionnaire was used to gather information from respondents. Findings indicated that respondents showed a positive attitude toward getting services over WhatsApp. Most of the respondents believe that use of WhatsApp can improve alert services (CAS, virtual reference, notifications) and libraries can utilise their potential for providing better user services. </div
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Background: With increasing numbers of new graduate nurses from accelerated nursing programs entering the workforce, it is important to understand their transition experiences, as they may differ from those of traditional graduates. Objectives: The aim of this study was to describe and compare the intrapersonal resources, transition experiences, and retention outcomes of these two groups. Design: A descriptive cross-sectional comparison study was conducted. Participants: A random sample of 3655 registered nurses with <3years of nursing experience were invited to participate from across Canada; 1020 responded (27.9%). The final sample included 230 nurses from accelerated programs and 768 from four-year programs (total n=998). Methods: Following ethics approval, participants were mailed a questionnaire to their home address. One month later non-responders were sent a reminder letter, followed by a second questionnaire one month later (January to March, 2013). Descriptive statistics were conducted using SPSS. Group differences were assessed using independent samples t-tests for continuous variables and χ(2) tests for categorical variables. Results: Overall, there were few significant differences between new graduate nurses from accelerated and traditional programs. Nurses in both groups had high levels of intrapersonal resources, positive transition experiences, were satisfied with their jobs and their choice of nursing as a career, and their intentions to leave were low. Conclusions: All new graduate nurses need to have a strong educational preparation and transition support, regardless of their age and previous work and career experiences.
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This study explores how mobile instant messaging use, affordances, and social capital may directly and indirectly influence positive employee outcomes. A field survey of 245Hong Kong real estate agents showed that their mobile instant messaging (MIM) use and affordances were positively associated with job performance, job satisfaction, and relational satisfaction, and with online bridging and bonding social capital. While bridging capital was not associated with any of the three outcomes, bonding social capital was positively related to the two satisfaction measures. However (with one small exception), neither type of social capital mediated relationships between MIM use and affordances, and employee outcomes.
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Aim: To test a model examining the effects of structural empowerment and support for professional practice on new graduate nurses' perceived professional practice behaviours, perceptions of care quality and subsequent job satisfaction and career turnover intentions. Background: The nursing worklife model describes relationships between supportive nursing work environments and nurse and patient outcomes. The influence of support for professional practice on new nurses' perceptions of professional nursing behaviours within this model has not been tested. Methods: Structural equation modelling in Mplus was used to analyse data from a national survey of new nurses across Canada (n = 393). Findings: The hypothesised model was supported: χ²(122) = 346.726, P = 0.000; CFI = 0.917; TLI = 0.896; RMSEA = 0.069. Professional practice behaviour was an important mechanism through which empowerment and supportive professional practice environments influenced nurse-assessed quality of care, which was related to job satisfaction and lower intentions to leave nursing. Conclusion: Job satisfaction and career retention of new nurses are related to perceptions of work environment factors that support their professional practice behaviours and high-quality patient care. Implications: Nurse managers can support new graduate nurses' professional practice behaviour by providing empowering supportive professional practice environments.
Article
Unlabelled: The first year of practice as a nurse is recognized as stressful. Graduate nurses (GNs) report gaps in their education, reality shock, burnout and other negative experiences that influence their intentions to remain in nursing. Objectives: The aim of this literature review was to gain a greater understanding of the experiences of GNs. Review methods: It included thirty-six articles that focused on GNs and their transition to nursing, as part of a graduate nurse program (GNP), from 2005 to present. Result: The review identified three main themes that influence the transition from student to registered nurse. These themes included, 1) feeling stressed and overwhelmed by nursing responsibilities, 2) the amount of support from senior nurses and 3) the importance of feedback on their performance as nurses. Conclusions: Further research that is focused on the support and feedback provided to new nurses is needed.
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Compulsory community service (CCS) for nurses commenced in South Africain January 2008 after it was legislated in the new Nursing Act (Act No. 33 of 2005). Nurses completing their registered nurse programme are registered as community nurse practitioners (CNPs) during the CCS period and make up the largest number of health professionals serving CCS. Whilst health institutions have welcomed CNPs as additional resources for the shortage of nursing staff, no structured guidelines have been provided at a regional level as to how these nurses should be utilised or managed during the CCS year. To date, no large-scale study has been conducted on nurses carrying out CCS in order to generalise the findings. To establish the perceptions of newly-qualified nurses carrying out CCS in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. A quantitative survey design was used to obtain data from a randomly selected sample of the 2012 cohort of nurses carrying out CCS in KwaZulu-Natal. CNPs have a positive attitude toward CCS and perceive themselves as being well prepared for the year of community service in terms of knowledge, skills and ability to administer nursing care. They identified positive benefits of the year of community service.The concerns raised were limited orientation and support; and a few CNPs experienced problems of acceptance by the nurses with whom they work. It is recommended that all health institutions who receive CNPs develop structured orientation and support for these nurses in order to promote their development, thereby enhancing their benefit to the communities they serve.
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Another one million community healthcare workers are needed to address the growing global population and increasing demand of health care services. This paper describes a cost comparison between two training approaches to better understand costs implications of training community health workers (CHWs) in Sub-Saharan Africa. Our team created a prospective model to forecast and compare the costs of two training methods as described in the Dalburge Report - (1) a traditional didactic training approach ("baseline") and (2) a blended eLearning training approach ("blended"). After running the model for training 100,000 CHWs, we compared the results and scaled up those results to one million CHWs. A substantial difference exists in total costs between the baseline and blended training programs. RESULTS indicate that using a blended eLearning approach for training community health care workers could provide a total cost savings of 42%. Scaling the model to one million CHWs, the blended eLearning training approach reduces total costs by 25%. The blended eLearning savings are a result of decreased classroom time, thereby reducing the costs associated with travel, trainers and classroom costs; and using a tablet with WiFi plus a feature phone rather than a smartphone with data plan. The results of this cost analysis indicate significant savings through using a blended eLearning approach in comparison to a traditional didactic method for CHW training by as much as 67%. These results correspond to the Dalberg publication which indicates that using a blended eLearning approach is an opportunity for closing the gap in training community health care workers.
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Background: Outdated communication technologies in healthcare can place patient safety at risk. This study aimed to evaluate implementation of the WhatsApp messaging service within emergency surgical teams. Methods: A prospective mixed-methods study was conducted in a London hospital. All emergency surgery team members (n = 40) used WhatsApp for communication for 19 weeks. The initiator and receiver of communication were compared for response times and communication types. Safety events were reported using direct quotations. Results: More than 1,100 hours of communication pertaining to 636 patients were recorded, generating 1,495 communication events. The attending initiated the most instruction-giving communication, whereas interns asked the most clinical questions (P < .001). The resident was the speediest responder to communication compared to the intern and attending (P < .001). The participants felt that WhatsApp helped flatten the hierarchy within the team. Conclusions: WhatsApp represents a safe, efficient communication technology. This study lays the foundations for quality improvement innovations delivered over smartphones.
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One of the most complicated academic endeavours in transmission pedagogies is to generate democratic participation of all students and public expression of silenced voices. While the potential of mobile phones, particularly mobile instant messaging (MIM), to trigger broadened academic participation is increasingly acknowledged in literature, integrating MIM into classrooms and out-of-the-classroom tasks has often been confronted with academic resistance. Academic uncertainty about MIM is often predicated on its perceived distractive nature and potential to trigger off-task social behaviours. This paper argues that MIM has potential to create alternative dialogic spaces for student collaborative engagements in informal contexts, which can gainfully transform teaching and learning. An instance of a MIM, WhatsApp, was adopted for an information technology course at a South African university with a view to heighten lecturer–student and peer-based participation, and enhance pedagogical delivery and inclusive learning in formal (lectures) and informal spaces. The findings suggest heightened student participation, the fostering of learning communities for knowledge creation and progressive shifts in the lecturer's mode of pedagogical delivery. However, the concomitant challenge of using MIM included mature adults' resentment of the merging of academic and family life occasioned by WhatsApp consultations after hours. Students also expressed ambivalence about MIM's wide-scale roll-out in different academic programmes.
Article
The goal of this study is to examine and understand the relationship between the utilization of Facebook features and two types of social capital: bonding and bridging. An online survey was conducted using a college sample (n = 256). The results show that, with bonding social capital, the frequent use of Like feature was positively associated whereas that of Comment was negatively associated. With bridging social capital, the frequent use of Wall was positively associated. The results also show that the preference for Wall, Friend, Comment, News Feed, Like, Message, Photo, and Chat was positively associated with both bonding and bridging social capital. On the other hand, the preference for Status and Group was positively associated only with bridging social capital. Limitations of this study and the implications of the findings are discussed and suggestions for future research are provided.
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Abstract Healthcare is being confronted with questions on how to deliver quality, affordable, and timely care to patients, especially those in rural areas, in systems already burdened by the lack of providers. Advanced Practice Registered Nurses (APRNs) have been challenged to lead this movement in providing care to these populations through the use of technologies, specifically telehealth. Unfortunately, APRNs have limited exposure to telehealth during their educational experience, thereby limiting their understanding and comfort with telehealth. To address this problem, a telehealth program was developed at a large university that prepares Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) APRN students. The telehealth program, embedded into the DNP curriculum, consisted of a simulation workshop, practice immersion, and written project. This program was well received by students, making them aware of the benefits and barriers to the implementation of telehealth as a care delivery modality. Telehealth was embraced as students implemented the program in their own practices.
Article
Objectives: The aim of this review was to identify best practices of formal new graduate nurse transition programs. This information would be useful for organizations in their support and development of formal transition programs for newly hired nurses. Design: An integrative review of the nursing research literature (2000-2011). Data sources: The literature search included PubMed (MEDLINE), the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), and the Excerpta Medica Database (Embase). Studies that dealt with programs geared toward pre-registration nursing students were removed. At least two researchers evaluated the literature to determine if the article met the inclusion and exclusion criteria. The final number of articles included in this review is 47. Review methods: Cooper's (1989) five-stage approach to integrative review guided the process: problem formulation, data collection, evaluation of data points, data analysis and interpretation, presentation of results. Results: Transition program literature was examined according to four major themes: Education (pre-registration and practice), Support/Satisfaction, Competency and Critical Thinking, and Workplace Environment. This included new graduates' retrospective accounts of their undergraduate education and examination of orientation and formal supports provided beyond the traditional unit orientation period. Transition programs included residencies, internships, mentorships, extended preceptorships, and generic programs. Common elements of programs were a specified resource person(s) for new graduates, mentor (mentorship), formal education, and peer support opportunities. The length, type of education, and supports provided varied considerably among programs, yet the presence of a transition program resulted in improved new graduate nurse retention and cost benefits. Conclusions: The variability in research designs limits the conclusions that can be drawn about best practices in transition programs for new graduate nurses. The presence of a formal new graduate transition program resulted in good retention and improved competency. The stronger evidence suggests that new graduate education should focus on practical skill development, preceptors should receive a level of formal training, formal support should be available at least through the difficult six to nine month post-hire period, opportunities for connection with their peers should be provided, and organizations should strive to ensure clinical units with healthy work environments.
Chapter
The concept of community of practice was not born in the systems theory tradition. It has its roots in attempts to develop accounts of the social nature of human learning inspired by anthropology and social theory (Lave, 1988; Bourdieu, 1977; Giddens, 1984; Foucault, 1980; Vygotsky, 1978). But the concept of community of practice is well aligned with the perspective of systems traditions. A community of practice itself can be viewed as a simple social system. And a complex social system can be viewed as constituted by interrelated communities of practice. In this essay I first explore the systemic nature of the concept at these two levels. Then I use this foundation to look at the applications of the concept, some of its main critiques, and its potential for developing a social discipline of learning.
Article
The aim of this study was to explore the socialisation experiences of new graduate baccalaureate nurses to practising nurses. How nurses contend with the stress of their professional role has been of interest to both researchers and healthcare administrators over the past 30 years. Work stress of clinical nurses comes mainly from organisational and professional factors. However, few studies have explored the professional and organisational socialisation experiences of new graduate nurses. A qualitative descriptive approach was adopted. Participants were graduates of a baccalaureate nursing programme and employed full time at four medical centres in Taiwan, their first full-time work experience. Data were collected through semi-structured, open-ended, in-depth interviews, which were transcribed verbatim and analysed by content analysis. Three themes were identified: overwhelming chaos, learning by doing and being an insider. Although the professional socialisation process was hard for the new graduate nurses, they needed much time to increase their knowledge and clinical skills to fulfil clinical needs. However, the hardest work was the organisational socialisation process, which involved fitting into the bureaucratic system, such as maintaining interpersonal relationships with colleagues and familiarising themselves with the ward rules and culture. Neophyte nurse participants were also frustrated by the conflict between professional and organisational values. The study findings show that the transition from new graduate nurse to practising nurse was stressful for these participants, particularly due to the clash between the professional value of patient-oriented nursing care and the organisational value of task-oriented nursing. Senior clinical nurses can consider this study's descriptions of new graduate nurses' experiences to help them become insiders and provide quality care.
Article
Today’s economy runs on knowledge, and most companies work assiduously to capitalize on that fact. They use cross-functional teams, customer- or product-focused business units, and work groups—to name just a few organizational forms—to capture and spread ideas and know-how. In many cases, these ways of organizing are very effective, and no one would argue for their demise. But a new organizational form is emerging that promises to complement existing structures and radically galvanize knowledge sharing, learning, and change. It’s called the community of practice. What are communities of practice? In brief, they’re groups of people informally bound together by shared expertise and passion for a joint enterprise—engineers engaged in deep-water drilling, for example, consultants who specialize in strategic marketing, or frontline managers in charge of check processing at a large commercial bank. Some communities of practice meet regularly—for lunch on Thursdays, say. Others are connected primarily by e-mail networks. A community of practice may or may not have an explicit agenda on a given week, and even if it does, it may not follow the agenda closely. Inevitably, however, people in communities of practice share their experiences and knowledge in free-flowing, creative ways that foster new approaches to problems.
Article
Ireland has seen much change in nurse education resulting in four year degree programmes since 2002. A unique aspect of these programmes was the incorporation of rostered internship. This study explored role transition for a cohort of students at pre and post-registration. The sample consisted of fourth year students registered on BSc nursing programmes (general, mental health and intellectual disability) within an Irish university. The samples were surveyed to compare their perceptions and expectations of role transition pre and post-registration. Data were analysed using SPSS (version 16). Respondents had high levels of confidence in clinical abilities both at pre-registration and post-registration. They also perceived themselves to be competent across a range of domains: managing workload, prioritising care delivery, interpersonal skills, time management and multidisciplinary team working. However, this research highlights pre-registration stress, the need for ongoing feedback and support and differences between expected and actual levels of direct patient care involvement. It is argued that the rostered internship provided students with a valuable opportunity for adjustment and preparation for their role as registered nurse. Recommendations include stress management, a supportive environment and post-registration preceptorship programmes to enhance professional development and gain confidence during the internship.
A study of students experiences of WhatsApp mobile learning
  • T Bansal
  • D Joshi
Bansal, T., Joshi, D., 2014. A study of students experiences of WhatsApp mobile learning. Global J. Human Soc. Sci. Res. 14 (4), 26-33.
Experiences of Community Service Practitioners Who Are Deployed at a Rural Health Facility in the Western Cape
  • B Beyers
Beyers, B., 2013. Experiences of Community Service Practitioners Who Are Deployed at a Rural Health Facility in the Western Cape [unpublished Minor Dissertation].
Personal Narratives of Newly Qualified Nurses in a Public Hospital in Gauteng Province (Doctoral Dissertation)
  • N J Mqokozo
Mqokozo, N.J., 2013. Personal Narratives of Newly Qualified Nurses in a Public Hospital in Gauteng Province (Doctoral Dissertation). University of the Witwatersrand.
Newly graduated nurses' orientation experiences: a systematic review of qualitative studies
  • K Pasila
  • S Elo
  • M Ainen
Pasila, K., Elo, S., K€ a€ ari€ ainen, M., 2017. Newly graduated nurses' orientation experiences: a systematic review of qualitative studies. Int. J. Nurs. Stud. 71, 17-27.
  • A Rosenfeld
  • S Sina
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  • S Kraus
Rosenfeld, A., Sina, S., Sarne, D., Avidov, O., Kraus, S., 2018. A Study of WhatsApp Usage Patterns and Prediction Models without Message Content arXiv preprint arXiv: 1802.03393.
Experiences and Support of the Newly-Qualified Four-Year Trained Professional Nurses Placed for Remunerated Community Service in Gauteng Province
  • A D Tsotetsi
Tsotetsi, A.D., 2012. Experiences and Support of the Newly-Qualified Four-Year Trained Professional Nurses Placed for Remunerated Community Service in Gauteng Province. Doctoral Dissertation. University of Pretoria.
Investigating academics" awareness & use of linkedin for professional networking
  • S Udenze
Udenze, S., 2017. Investigating academics" awareness & use of linkedin for professional networking. Int. J. Acad. Res. Psychol. 1 (4), 148-152.
Professional Nurses' Experiences of Their Community Service Placement Year at a Secondary Academic Hospital in the Western Cape
  • L Zaayman
Zaayman, L., 2016. Professional Nurses' Experiences of Their Community Service Placement Year at a Secondary Academic Hospital in the Western Cape. Mini Dissertation. University of the Western Cape.