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Abstract

Die ökonomische Lehre, wie sie sich im Grundlagenstudium präsentiert, ist in hohem Maße formalisiert: Die Studierenden lernen in formalen Modellen zu argumentieren und zu rechnen. Welche Herausforderungen stellt der mathematische Zugang dar und wie gehen Studierende damit um?

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Der Beitrag rekonstruiert die verborgenen Selbstbilder, die in Hauptwerken und Lehrbüchern der Ökonomik seit den 1870er-Jahren enthalten sind. Die Autorin analysiert die sprachlichen Selbstbeschreibungen ökonomischer Ansätze: welche Ziele setzen sie sich, für welche Personen wird die Theorie formuliert und nach welchen Kriterien wird dabei vorgegangen? Die Analyse verdeutlicht, wie weit sie sich die Lehrbuchökonomie heute von dem ursprünglichen Anspruch der Politischen Ökonomie als einer praktischen und moralischen Wissenschaft entfernt hat.
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Thesis
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Dusek, Tamás. 2018. Methodological Monism in Economics. Journal of Philosophical Economics I (2): 26-50.
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Brief an den Verein für Socialpolitik. 11
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