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Managing to Collaborate with Secondary Mathematics Teachers at a Distance: Using Storyboards as a Virtual Place for Practice and Consideration of Realistic Classroom Contingencies

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OPEN ACCESS LINK: http://www.learntechlib.org/p/216903/ ABSTRACT: We describe how we further developed StoryCircles to support teacher learning online during COVID-19. In StoryCircles, a facilitator gathers teachers to collectively represent a lesson through iterative phases of scripting, visualizing, and arguing about alternatives. We share new innovations to the StoryCircles process that have helped us overcome common challenges, such as supporting teachers in anticipating elements of the lesson prior to implementation and intervening on teachers’ learning with instructional practices that may be novel for the group. Our work has implications for teacher educators across the world who are committed to supporting teachers to learn in, from, and for the complexities of actual classroom practice but are facing the very real challenges necessitated by times of extreme societal disruption—having to cancel field experiences or offer teacher education courses in blended contexts.

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The role of the critical friend in the development of teacher expertise
  • F Kroath
Kroath, F. (1990). The role of the critical friend in the development of teacher expertise. Paper presented at an International symposium on Research on Effective and Responsible Teaching, Université de Fribourg Suisse, Fribourg, Switzerland, 3-7 September.